urinary catheters and bags, tips please

Share your ideas about the practical side of caring.
Mum has a urinary catheter for which she uses a leg bag during the day and a night bag is attached to day bag overnight.

With the lastest lots of leg bags, the urine either just doesn't flow into the day bag or, it fills up the leg bag like a balloon but doesn't empty into the leg bag, even with no apparent twists in the tubing. I gave to raise up the hospital bed and apply pressure to the leg bag to get it to drain. The two sides of the leg bag seem to be stuck together and difficult to pull apart even if all the valves are opened so air can flow in. Do others have this problem?

Also mum is experiencing discomfort around her bladder she didn't used to have. She doesn't have a urinary track infection right now. Any thoughts? We are waiting for a urologist appointment that was just postponed......
The GP practice should have a Continence Nurse to advise you. My mum's was brilliant, but the carers were useless. I'm not sure that it's appropriate for someone to have a leg bag when they are in bed a lot, because then the urine can't drain away.
(I've had a catheter after several ops, when I was in bed after major surgery I always had a night bag, never a day bag on my leg).
My husband is bedridden and has a catheter. He has carers who come in morning and night. They often have problems with the night bags sticking together, as you say, and occasionally the urine hasn't flowed from the day bag to the night bag and is like a balloon. You need to use a fresh bag and see if that works. Do you dispose of the night bag every morning? I know some people re-use them but I never do. Remember to change the day bag once a week. We get ours supplied on prescription which makes life easier.

My husband has major problems with his catheter. It frequently bypasses, meaning he is soaked in urine in the morning even though he also wears nappy type pads as he is doubly incontinent. Make sure his catheter is changed regularly, normally every 12 weeks but my husband's is changed every 8 weeks as he gets so many urine infections with it.
How are you getting on with the problem now?
Does anyone have a male caree with a long term indwelling catheter who experiences lots of bleeding?

I accept that it only takes a little blood to turn the urine red but I'm convinced we are being given the brush off by medics over my dad's blood loss.

My dad has Parkinson's and really poor dexterity and mobility ...even at the best times of his life he was just plain awkward ....and we are struggling to keep his catheter secured so it's constantly being tugged though he never seems to be uncomfortable.

Any tips would be appreciated
Hello Babybyrd, My Husband has had a catheter for about 4mths, about 2 weeks ago he had lots of blood in the bag, was over weekend so I phoned DN, kept saying is it rose coloured? , NO, anyway early Sunday morning had to have Doctor to change as blocked by blood clots, 4hrs later blocked again, DN came out and was going to change again!! I said to her, it will block again, she said probabaly? I had kept the bag and showed it to DN who then decided hospital as was nearly pure blood. So in hospital flushed Husband's bladder, kept in for a day and discharged, going to have camera to see what caused bleeding, but so far ok. As you say it doesn't take much blood to colour urine,but as you are worried you need to try again, won't your Dad's doctor come out to see him? Best wishes
I have no experience of catheters - yet.
But in the very likely chance of having to get used to them in the near future - can you clear up a point that is confusing me? During the night do you have TWO bags? - one on the leg (day bag) and another one outside the bed (night one) and is the idea that when the leg bag is full it drains into the night bag? It sounds as though you do, and this seems strange and inpractical.
When I was in hospital for a hysterectomy (many years ago) some people had catheters but they only had the night bag.
When they were able to walk around during the day they carried it themselves (it had a handle) - the ladies in my ward called them handbags and made a joke of it!
I presume the bags are supplied by the NHS and wonder if they are sub standard like those horrible bulky pads. If you can afford it, the ones bought privately are much better and more absorbent.
My mum had a leg bag for the day, and that was REMOVED at night, once tucked up in bed the night bag was connected. Hygiene is a huge issue, mum ended up with urinary sepsis and was never the same again.
The "Continence Nurse" left strict instructions about what should be done, staff either didn't understand or didn't care. Sometimes I would go into mum's house and it would absolutely stink of stale urine.
Mum used to have a brilliant sense of smell, we used to say she was a bloodhound, fortunately by the time she was poorly she couldn't smell much.
Rosemary, you haven't answered any of these replies and suggestions, I hope everything's OK with you.
Hi all

Firstly ...Linda ..I am so sorry I have not thanked you for your reply before now. My dad ended up with an ambulance to a and e ..has been on urology ward now for 6 days. Finally a consultant decided to look for the cause and not just treat a symptom. I am seriously angry with urology nurse ...another hospitals a and e and two GPS who all said the heavy bleeding was it no concern. He had lost half his own blood and had a four unit transfusion! Hopefully now ..after almost a week of continual bladder irrigation and passing some huge and painful nasty clots ..he is being sorted out

Anyway ...catheters and bags. My dad's night bag is single use ..holds 2000 ml. It's supported on a floor stand and it attaches to his leg bag which stays on for approx 6 days. I just asked his gp to prescribe bags like the hospital had used and they are good. I've had a few free samples from other companies and actually haven't found anything better.

Just one warning ..don't ever drop a full night bag ...when they hit the ground they tend to split ......... Nuff said