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Understanding medical words - Carers UK Forum

Understanding medical words

Share your ideas about the practical side of caring.
I am a care for my grandad who is in hospital at the moment. What does underlying dementia means
Hi David ... lining dementia ... in what context ?

An Internet search throws up lining in the context of silver lining ... hope for an eventual cure ... a couple of references to brain lining as to cause.
I meant underlying dementia
Underlying dementia ... the causes thereof ?

NHS for a general summary :

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/dementia/causes/


Alzheimer's Society ... slightly more technical :

https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/about-dem ... tia-causes
Hello David
My understanding, and I may be wrong, is the medical staff are checking to see if your grandad indeed has dementia, and if so determine what sort. Several sorts of dementia. Alzheimer's and vascular seem to be the main ones.
I would ask the staff to explain to you what they actually mean.
Welcome David,

David_18041 wrote:
Sat Dec 07, 2019 7:58 am
I am a care for my grandad who is in hospital at the moment. What does underlying dementia means
My assumption would be that if your loved one, up till this point, does not have a formal diagnosis of Dementia, that upon hospital admission he is presenting (showing symptoms) of somebody that has gone under the radar till this point. Does not mean he has it. We all act out of sorts when we're poorly, especially as we get older.

There are plenty of reasons a person can present this way, commonly water infections (for example) which can bring about confusion uncharacteristic of that person's usual behaviour in even the healthiest people, but especially the elderly.

But don't take my word for it, as a member of family their duty of care extends to you, and they have a responsibility to explain things properly and not use ambiguous language especially as you look after him. They should not be throwing the D word around so liberally unless they are absolutely sure because of the worry it (and in this case clearly has) causes.

Please do ensure that when your grandfather is able to leave hospital, do not allow them to discharge until you have everything in place you need, this can be a package of care, equipment for personal care tasks (lifting etc)

I hope everything works out for you and your grandfather, but please do feel welcome to stick around if you want to talk about anything else when this crisis is over. We've all been there at some point.

Best wishes to you and your family
For one definition of underlying:

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictio ... underlying
David_18041 wrote:
Sat Dec 07, 2019 7:58 am
I am a care for my grandad who is in hospital at the moment. What does underlying dementia means
This article may be helpful
https://www.symptomfind.com/diseases-co ... s/dementia

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David, would you like to tell us a bit more about grandad, and the reasons for his admission?
No one wants to have dementia, but IF he has a formal diagnosis of dementia, it will mean exemption from Council Tax, possible entitlement to Attendance Allowance, and maybe additional pension payments.
Money doesn't make someone better, but it can certainly help make life easier. Is he going to be in hospital for a long time, or are they planning discharge before Christmas? Back to where he was living, or somewhere else?
Hospitals try to discharge as many patients as possible, but sometimes don't always make sure that they will have the care and the aids they need. You have been warned!
Do not allow discharge anywhere until they have actually provided what is required, and it is all in situ.
Hope you check back in,

This is a difficult time of year for all within the care community, but of particular concern where loved ones in hospital are concerned, because of the way discharge teams will be eager to get people out before Christmas, basically playing on the emotions of the patient versus things not properly being put in place at the expense of that individuals carer and general support network.