Transition from hospital to nursing home

Share your ideas about the practical side of caring.
Mrs A, cue that old joke:

'My wife's in bed with layryngitis'

'Oh hell, those damn Greeks get everywhere' (etc)

(not to be confused with one's wife 'asleep in the arms of Morpheus'.....!) :)
Thank you for all the posts, they are reassuring.

My mum is not mobile since her pelvis fracture so taking her out is not an option. Also the effects of morphine have caused delirium which at its worst was horrendous, she is a little calmer now, lucid at times but them doesn't even realise she is in hospital. She also has poor eyesight and is hard of hearing so her options for activities are limited which makes me so sad as she loved reading, cooking, sewing gardening etc. She has lost interest in just about everything.

I have POA so can manage her financial affairs, I need to think about sorting this out for myself!
Morphine is brilliant for pain relief but it certainly messes with the brain.
I remember when my father in law, about 80 at the time, was in a modern hospital after major surgery, he told my husband that the rats came out from under the skirting board when it was dusk!! Once he recovered from the surgery he went back to his own home and lived there for another 7 years ago, by himself.
Did they operate on mum, or is the pelvis stable and being allowed to mend by itself? (My friend went skiing, came home in an air ambulance having broken her pelvis, didn't have surgery, but wasn't allowed to weight bear so had to hop around the house for months).
it's so sad watching a parent unable to enjoy anything any more.
She didn't have surgery and although the pain is less than it was she can just about stand with help.
Hopefully it's still healing then.
Regina_1709 wrote:
Thu Jan 18, 2018 8:33 am
Thank you for all the posts, they are reassuring.

My mum is not mobile since her pelvis fracture so taking her out is not an option. Also the effects of morphine have caused delirium which at its worst was horrendous, she is a little calmer now, lucid at times but them doesn't even realise she is in hospital. She also has poor eyesight and is hard of hearing so her options for activities are limited which makes me so sad as she loved reading, cooking, sewing gardening etc. She has lost interest in just about everything.

I have POA so can manage her financial affairs, I need to think about sorting this out for myself!
Definitely too much for any one person to cope with carewise. She needs a round the clock team. Sad, but thank heaven there is a place for her, so many others are being discharged home unsafely
Please don't be too sad at her losing interest in everything. This is, after all, something that will likely happen to us as we reach towards the end of our lives. In a way, you know, it is a blessing - how dreadful to face the end of one's life while still wanting to go on living and being so involved in life! Easier, surely, to be 'letting go' and to use that old phrase 'turn our faces to the wall'.

Surely that must make our passing easier for us, even if sadder for the children.....
My mum was discharged from hospital yesterday, 4 days earlier than planned and spent her first night at the nursing home last night. I went with her in the ambulance and visited later in the afternoon, When I visited today I was alarmed that she had spent the night in the armchair in the general living area as she wouldn't settle in bed and kept telling the carers to leave her alone. I feel wretched and so bad, have I made the right decision about this home? I spent last night and this morning in tears and am besides myself with worry about my mum. I so wish I could bring her home but it is impossible and my guilt is eating me up.
Maybe that was the right decision, to avoid her getting upset and distressed, rathef than forcing her? It's going to take courage this week, for both of you, but you know this is what mum NEEDS. She will settle, but it can't be easy for her to know she can never go back home, is probably grieving for a lot of things. Maybe the doctor can give her something gentle to relieve her distress if it continues.
i am not sure she understands what is going on and with poor hearing, eyesight and English not her first language it makes things even more difficult. I feel I have abandoned her. I can't stop thinking about her and feel so anxious all the time. The nurses at the home will be aware so I guess they will contact the Dr?