[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/phpbb/session.php on line 585: sizeof(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/phpbb/session.php on line 641: sizeof(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable
Pre paid funerals - Carers UK Forum

Pre paid funerals

Share your ideas about the practical side of caring.
Hi all,
Just after some feedback . My dad is quite elderly now and lives in a care home . He has some medical issues ( CKD, AF and mild dementia) . I have POA and have just recently sold his home, so other than the care fees he has no other bills to pay . He made a will some years ago and I checked with a solicitor to make sure it was still valid with regards to him not having property now . My understanding is that when he dies so does the POA. My question is will all his assets be frozen automatically ??? If so how would I pay for his funeral ? I was wondering if it would be better to sort out a pre- paid funeral . My thinking is it might save a lot of stress later . Of course I will ask my dad on his thoughts . X
Hi Elyse

Yes, the PoA does die at the same time, and yes his bank/savings accounts will be frozen until probate has been granted. Are you Executor for Dad's estate ? If so I wouldn't worry too much about how to pay for his funeral - banks will release assets to pay for a funeral once they have seen the death certificate and a copy of the will naming you as Executor. In any case funeral costs are an allowable debt against the estate so you would get that back before any bequests are made (i.e. it doesn't come out of your 'share').

Pre-paid funeral plans can be a good way to go but a one off premium is quite high - last time I checked for myself (single female,age 70, in relatively good health) it was going to be in the region of £4000+ and that was a few years back with The Co-Op so I expect it's higher now. Some undertakers have their own plans so it might be worthwhile contacting a couple and checking out their schemes.
Yes, when various relatives have died, the bank paid the funeral immediately on receipt of the bill from the undertaker. When dad dies, the account will NOT be entirely frozen.

I discovered that if I went into the bank and handed a cheque to the staff, they could effectively unfreeze the account and pay the money in, BUT no automatic payments in can be made.

This is really useful to know when dealing with refunds. For example, mum had to pay for her care home in advance, the unused portion of the last month was paid to me in a cheque which I could bank. It saves the requirement for setting up an executors account, if it's just money going in which you are dealing with. I just wish I'd known this in advance of all my relatives passing away, not just after the last one!
Thank you both for your replies. I was just concerned that I don't have enough of my money to pay for his funeral upfront . I am named as one of the exceutors in his will . X
I've been involved in various ways with settling the affairs of six different family members - our four parents, brother, and my husband, so feel free to ask about anything around the subject. My mum's funeral was the last. I knew she was dying, and made plans in advance. I had a word with the funeral director in advance, and told the home which company to contact, prior to going away on a long planned and much needed holiday. I spent time thinking about which music to use at the service, some relatives were brought up as Muslim, since their mum was Egyptian, so we didn't use the ordinary CofE service, but had a civil celebrant instead which worked well. It's much easier to accept the inevitable and plan in advance.
YEs, I think it's probably a good idea to pay for pre plan now especially if you can discuss it with him first. That might open discussion on any details HE might particularly want, or not want, which would help you later.
Bear in mind you can just pay for "basic" one........final details or upgrades can be added to it later.
And of course you will have to let the HOme know the details once you have a plan.
PS did mine recently......my kids say silly Mum!! But hey, sorted.
The bank will allow his funeral to be paid out of his account because funeral expenses come out of the assets . anyway. When it comes to it the funeral directors are usually very good and helpful. Do not choose the most expensive coffin. No-one at the funeral will notice how 'posh' it is and it's going in the ground for goodness sake. My Mum's funeral directors did ask me whether the grave would be opened again. If no, then the cheapest is fine. If yes, then a more robust one might be better. Also don't forget that there is a charge for retrieving the body from the place of death (Home?). When I realised my Mum didn't have long to live, I contacted my local Funeral Directors and warned them so that when she died they were aware of her, had my name, number and address and were prompt and prepared when the call came. The costs depend on where, when and what of course but even though my Mum had a funeral service in Yorkshire and an internment in South Wales plus transport in between the costs were somewhere between 5 and 6 thousand. Sorry haven't got exact figure in my head. I was able to pay but Mum's bank did offer to cover from her account if I sent the invoices to them. I think a funeral plan is fine if a fixed fee one can pay off years before the actual event. However as long as Dad has enough to cover then don't panic. There's no harm in contacting a Funeral Directors in advance to get a quote.
However there are expenses you will have to cover or do without, things like notice in the paper, flowers, service sheets and 'wake'. Anything that isn't absolutely required by law -as an interment is. Oh and the Church charges too, and if you go for an organist and choir they all add up considerably!!
All of which you can well do without when grieving.
KR
E.
I would keep everything as 'cheap' as possible. It's very easy to be 'persuaded' that 'Dear Mum/Dad would love a satin lined antique ebony coffin with real gold handles' (etc etc), and you'll be made to feel guilty that you are 'skimping' etc etc etc! .

Warning - don't think 'eco-funerals' are any cheaper. If anything, the reverse.

Decide what is really important to you, and stick to it.

When it comes to these prepaid plans, calculate the TOTAL cost against what you get, and then cost out the equivalent offering (ie, what you get) if you bought it all NOW, then add a small percentage for inflation etc. See which is cheaper.

If you start a prepaid plan you are a captive customer - you have no further choice and therefore no further leverage.

You could just put a lump sum for the funeral into new bank account and leave it there until the time comes when you need it.

Remember, when the actual funeral arrives, you'll be in a VERY emotional state, so can be 'carried away' on extras etc.

Overall, from what I can remember, a cremation is significantly cheaper than an interment.

Sadly, with my MIL, although, apparently, there is a plot where her husband is buried in Scotland, and a place for her, (I must check this out sometime!), the cost of getting her body there will be high, so I suspect she's getting a cremation, and only the ashes interred. She's a devout atheist anyway, (and has deep dementia now), so I doubt she'd care one way or the other - she doesn't think she's going to be looking down from a cloud or anything. (I think she will, though!:) )
bowlingbun wrote:I've been involved in various ways with settling the affairs of six different family members - our four parents, brother, and my husband, so feel free to ask about anything around the subject. My mum's funeral was the last. I knew she was dying, and made plans in advance. I had a word with the funeral director in advance, and told the home which company to contact, prior to going away on a long planned and much needed holiday. I spent time thinking about which music to use at the service, some relatives were brought up as Muslim, since their mum was Egyptian, so we didn't use the ordinary CofE service, but had a civil celebrant instead which worked well. It's much easier to accept the inevitable and plan in advance.
I'm really glad we aren't related, BB, your expertise in the business of death slightly disturbs me!
I have only acted as executor once so far, and the deeply Scottish legal vocabulary of death had me utterly baffled: they use ancient legalistic words that are in no dictionary here, I needed an interpreter!