Page 1 of 2

grateful for advice on helping my Mum

Posted: Sat Dec 02, 2017 11:56 pm
by susan_170912
Good morning from New Zealand

My name is Susan and I would love to ask for any comments you may have. My Mum in Lancashire is very poorly and cannot leave her sheltered accommodation; I have got her a great care package with 4 carers a day visiting to help my Mum get in and out of bed.
My problem is my Mum's best mate has moved abroad and this mate used to collect my Mum's state pension for her every week at the post office and take it to her in her sheltered accommodation.
I have no relatives or friends who can get my Mum's pension for her; the carers are not allowed to get her pension causeless of the possibility of financial abuse.
Does anyone know of any organisations that might be able to help my Mum or that I could pay for to get the pension?
I would love to hear if any one else has been in this situation or if you have any advice for me.
Many thanks and best wishes for the Advent season
Susan

Re: grateful for advice on helping my Mum

Posted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 1:01 pm
by bowlingbun
Hi Susan,
I'm not a legally qualified expert, but have cared for 10 different people, and have a son with severe learning difficulties, now 38, who cannot read, write or do any maths. His carers CAN support him with his money, although quite honestly they are not very good at it. The main difference between him and your mum is that he can go to the bank with carers to get his money. His problem is working out what he can afford.
I know that in Hampshire, the County Council has a Client Affairs Unit which handles the financial affairs of clients who cannot do it themselves. IF mum rents her property and has minimal savings all they will need to do is apply to become "Appointee" with DWP to manage her benefits.
However, if she has property and savings they would probably need to apply to the Court of Protection for "Guardianship". There would be an annual cost for this service, as they would need to account to the COP for all expenditure.
Does anyone have Power of Attorney?

Re: grateful for advice on helping my Mum

Posted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 1:20 pm
by susieq
I do know that the state pension can be paid monthly directly into a bank account, but of course this begs the question how will your Mum be able to access her money because of her mobility problems.

If not already done you could set up direct debits for all regular utility bills - gas, electric, water, council tax, telephone etc

I might suggest contacting the local branch of Age UK to see if their 'befriending' service might cover this kind of situation ?

Re: grateful for advice on helping my Mum

Posted: Wed Dec 06, 2017 11:55 am
by Lars_1708
Hi Susan,

we got Power Of Attorney for my mum. If you got that perhaps you could do it remotely. My mum already had a direct debit from the DWP to get the pension paid into her account. But I think this has already been suggested in a recent post, so not sure if that helps any more, as I'm not sure how she could then access the money, which I suspect is your main issue.

Either way, I would consider the Power Of Attorney if of course you have the time to do this kind of thing.

Re: grateful for advice on helping my Mum

Posted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 7:58 pm
by susan_170912
bowlingbun wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 1:01 pm
Hi Susan,
I'm not a legally qualified expert, but have cared for 10 different people, and have a son with severe learning difficulties, now 38, who cannot read, write or do any maths. His carers CAN support him with his money, although quite honestly they are not very good at it. The main difference between him and your mum is that he can go to the bank with carers to get his money. His problem is working out what he can afford.
I know that in Hampshire, the County Council has a Client Affairs Unit which handles the financial affairs of clients who cannot do it themselves. IF mum rents her property and has minimal savings all they will need to do is apply to become "Appointee" with DWP to manage her benefits.
However, if she has property and savings they would probably need to apply to the Court of Protection for "Guardianship". There would be an annual cost for this service, as they would need to account to the COP for all expenditure.
Does anyone have Power of Attorney?
Thankyou so very much indeed; yes my sister has power of attorney and I managed to get social services to help.
I also found out this - the Post Office has a service known as Permanent Agent Access. This requires an appointed person to have a card and pin of their own to allow withdrawal on my mum's behalf. there may be the option of having a named carer to assist this way, withdrawal and balance receipts would be issued to safeguard against financial abuse. This can be set up on an existing account, it requires a signed form and I.D from nominated person. This could be the manager who would then give the cash to the carer as another safe guard. The social services helped with this; thank you so very much ; I am so grateful

Re: grateful for advice on helping my Mum

Posted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 7:59 pm
by susan_170912
susieq wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 1:20 pm
I do know that the state pension can be paid monthly directly into a bank account, but of course this begs the question how will your Mum be able to access her money because of her mobility problems.

If not already done you could set up direct debits for all regular utility bills - gas, electric, water, council tax, telephone etc

I might suggest contacting the local branch of Age UK to see if their 'befriending' service might cover this kind of situation ?
Dear Susie Q thank you so very much; great help
all good wishes from New Zealand

grateful for advice on dealing with sister to help my Mum

Posted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 8:00 pm
by susan_170912
Lars_1708 wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 11:55 am
Hi Susan,

we got Power Of Attorney for my mum. If you got that perhaps you could do it remotely. My mum already had a direct debit from the DWP to get the pension paid into her account. But I think this has already been suggested in a recent post, so not sure if that helps any more, as I'm not sure how she could then access the money, which I suspect is your main issue.

Either way, I would consider the Power Of Attorney if of course you have the time to do this kind of thing.
Thank you so much Lars; that is so helpful

Susan

grateful for advice on dealing with sister to help my Mum

Posted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 8:14 pm
by susan_170912
HI there from New Zealand
I would love to ask a question. Happy Advent everyone by the way
I am in New Zealand and my sister in the Uk has full power of attorney for my elderly Mum; I have asked my sister to get some key medical information about my Mum from Mum's GP, in advance of a specialist appointment so we can discuss how to help Mum get the best care

My sister says
Power of attorney means I can make decisions for Mum when she no longer has mental capacity or short term financial decisions if she is in hospital and does have mental capacity. It doesn't mean I can get whatever information I want whenever I want.

I am sure she can get this information; what do you think.

My sister refuses to have a mobile with an answering machine on so she can't take calls from my Mum's GP or anyone else; I have offered to buy her a mobile
Has anyone got any ideas on how to encourage my sister to be more readily available
Thanks so much
Susan

Re: grateful for advice on dealing with sister to help my Mum

Posted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 10:02 pm
by nicholas_1612
Hi. I've p o. a for my mum.
You're correct. With p o a you are that person and can obtain as much information as you want.

Re: grateful for advice on dealing with sister to help my Mum

Posted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 10:31 pm
by nhshater
There are currently 2 types of lasting power of attorney and possibly still some enduring powers of attorney which were around until lasting powers of attorney replaced them. The lasting power of attorney for financial affairs can be used even if the donor has mental capacity. The health and welfare ones can't. However if your mother has mental capacity she can choose to allow you access to her medical records etc. she only has to tell the doctor she agrees although in practice a signed letter may well be required. I"m sorry if Nicholas disagrees but I assume his mother either doesn't have capacity or has given her permission. Or that the doctors are running roughshod over the rules
I have a health and welfare power of attorney for my partner who has mental capacity but I have access to his medical information on the basis of a much earlier single sheet letter that basically just says to whom it may concern I give permission for xxxx to have access to all medical information about me.

Sending best wishes to Aotearoa. We had 3 great holidays there (before the hobbits moved in) and they are the most common good memories we now share.