Getting a scooter for Dad?

Share your ideas about the practical side of caring.
For a change, a practical post not a rant about the old man.

Hes decided know he can't get about and needs a scooter. In the past hes had his bathroom modified, stair lift fitted etc and got a Disabled Facilities Grant. Am I right this is just for modifications to your home and not things like this?

Of course, Dad wants one NOW and is not willing to pay if he can possibly help it.

As with everything hes so scared of actually spending any money he'll hold off and hold off just in case hes got to spend money until he absolutely has no choice then wants it now.

Just glad I pushed the stair lift issue because he didn't want to go ahead with that. Hes had it 6 months now and thinks its great and honestly couldnt live there without it.

Failing a grent whats best place to get one?
paul_1607 wrote:
Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:30 am
For a change, a practical post not a rant about the old man.

Hes decided know he can't get about and needs a scooter. In the past hes had his bathroom modified, stair lift fitted etc and got a Disabled Facilities Grant. Am I right this is just for modifications to your home and not things like this?

Of course, Dad wants one NOW and is not willing to pay if he can possibly help it.

As with everything hes so scared of actually spending any money he'll hold off and hold off just in case hes got to spend money until he absolutely has no choice then wants it now.

Just glad I pushed the stair lift issue because he didn't want to go ahead with that. Hes had it 6 months now and thinks its great and honestly couldnt live there without it.

Failing a grant what's best place to get one?
I got my wife's scooter from here:- http://www.mobilitygiant.co.uk/

Virtually new, £1500 instead of £3,500, (and no problems yet, three years on).
Paul I would suggest a trial run of some kind before laying out large sums of money !

If you have a branch of Shopmobility near you (usually found in local shopping centres) they will hire one out for a nominal fee - it would give Dad (and you) the chance to see if he would be safe using one !

http://www.shopmobility.org.uk/
susieq wrote:
Mon Sep 17, 2018 5:47 pm
Paul I would suggest a trial run of some kind before laying out large sums of money !

If you have a branch of Shopmobility near you (usually found in local shopping centres) they will hire one out for a nominal fee - it would give Dad (and you) the chance to see if he would be safe using one !

http://www.shopmobility.org.uk/
Yes good point - it might be worth doing this.

I think he'll be ok on it though. Past experience has shown when hes got no choice but to try he can pick things up well.
Paul- I think I missed the fact you had got the stair lift sorted - well done on that, I know how much resistance you were up against.
May be worth looking on sites like gum tree, ebay for used models?
Henrietta wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 11:13 am
Paul- I think I missed the fact you had got the stair lift sorted - well done on that, I know how much resistance you were up against.
May be worth looking on sites like gum tree, ebay for used models?
Yes exactly the same fight as always with the same result. He couldnt do without it now to be honest and he admits that.

I thought £500 was cheap for a new one - like I said he can well afford it anyway. Just wondering if I buy 2nd hand I'm going to be the one with hassle of getting it repaired/working again.....
Paul, is this wise? Reading Henrietta's very perceptive comment on your other thread, that it seems your dad really is developing dementia, it may not be safe for him - or others! - if he has a motorised scooter?
I like the idea of hiring one to try out.
One of my brothers was desperate to get out and bought himself a new mobility scooter - he was envious of my other brother who had a leg amputation and used one all the time - but he could not hold himself up on it upright properly. We had three mobility scooters to get rid of - one was a heavy collapsible one we got second-hand which fitted into my car (not advisable for Paul) - and they were very hard to get rid of. A complete loss of money. You could advertise looking for one somewhere. We found that the time when we wanted to sell did not coincide with the times when people needed them. But even if it's safe and he can use it, it needs a bit of effort to run - store, recharge and so on. Think about it carefully.
jenny lucas wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 12:03 pm
Paul, is this wise? Reading Henrietta's very perceptive comment on your other thread, that it seems your dad really is developing dementia, it may not be safe for him - or others! - if he has a motorised scooter?
Yeh know what you mean. BUT I dont see any option.
Even Dad has said he wants one. Its not like him - usually you have to talk him around.

Otherwise, hes stuck at home. Then something will have to change - the care home is not an option as far as hes concerned.
Just don't spend too much on one!