Finding challenging things to do with failing eyesight.

Share your ideas about the practical side of caring.
Rosemary_1706 wrote:
Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:02 am
Mum had similar problems. She belonged to the Deaf and Blind society(?). Perhaps they would have ideas.

It's deafblind uk. Also search under 'deafblindness'.
Thank you Rosemary. I looked up deafblindness. I will definitely use this again.
Ostrich wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 6:29 pm
My Mom 86 has macular degenerationa dna is also totally deaf in on ear and the other needs a hearing aid which she won't wear but her her hearing has deteriorated oer the last few years we went for hearing test and yes worse, But still nope makes her world more insular than it needs to be she loves the talking newspapers (so much so I volunteered and now read once every 5 weeks) but Mom has always loved word searches and the like so I buy the large print ones and get them photocopied up to A3 size makes it easier she can follow that with her eye glass (magnifier) Mom has memory issues too now but still loves word search and also plays basic computer games on the desk top (okay I replaced standard screen with 40" one) but ey ho she adores it and plays patience and jenga all day of you would let her
Thanks Ostrich. Mum looks forward to the talking newspapers arriving. Well done you for volunteering. She must love the fact that you are one of the readers. My Mum can't see any more so anything written down is/has gone by the board. Jenga.....now I vaguely remember that when the children were small.....mm. Perhaps that. I wish there was a toy lending library in our town. I could try things out then. I buy things thinking.....that might work....and it doesn't, or its use is limited. I find it amazing how things for the blind are so expensive. It's like with anything ....add the word disability to it and it doubles/trebles in price.
We do write letters and she signs them. It's strange seeing how her lovely old fashioned writing has become so scrawled but I still look at it with affection and at the bottom of a neatly typed letter, it still looks nice.
Charity shops are often a very good source of cheap toys, and their low prices (compared with new) could mean you can try out things without too much expense. Of course, the choice is a bit limited!

I suppose, grimly, the reason that anything for the 'disabled' is more expensive is simply that it is a limited market, compared with 'ordinary' markets for goods, so there is less economy of scale in production costs?

But it's definitely ironic, (!), given that by and large the 'disabled' are one of the most financially stricken groups in the country.....
jenny lucas wrote:
Thu Sep 13, 2018 9:03 am
Charity shops are often a very good source of cheap toys, and their low prices (compared with new) could mean you can try out things without too much expense. Of course, the choice is a bit limited!

I suppose, grimly, the reason that anything for the 'disabled' is more expensive is simply that it is a limited market, compared with 'ordinary' markets for goods, so there is less economy of scale in production costs?

But it's definitely ironic, (!), given that by and large the 'disabled' are one of the most financially stricken groups in the country.....
Good idea charity shops Jenny. I will make a point of asking for "disabled stuff". They must get it in from time to time.