EMS or TENS

Share your ideas about the practical side of caring.
Has anyone had experience with EMS or TENS equipment? My father has been bedridden for 2 years with no physiotherapy resulting in atrophy of his leg muscles-he keeps his legs bent up. My mother, his main carer, is unable to do the physio on him which was suggested. I am wondering if an Electronic Muscle Stimulation (EMS) device or a TENS device might be a help in giving him back a little flexibility. Any advice would be gratefully received.
Hi Laura... EMS (Electronic Muscle Stimulation) will stimulate muscle, whereas TENS (Transacutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) is used more for pain relief.

Whether EMS will restore flexibility after 2 years is doubtful, but it may help prevent further muscle atrophication. You would need to try it very gently at first, to test how well or even if his muscles respond after so long, because you could cause injury or discomfort if you do too much too soon.

Is there no-one other than your Mum who could do his physio with him?

I hope this helps x
After a knee replacement, my knee was very swollen. I took advice from our pharmacy and bought a Circulation Booster. Cost about £170, but worth every penny. You just sit with your feet on it, and then set the machine to the right strength. At the highest strength the muscles are visible contracting. You can't use one if you have a pacemaker, VAT free is you are disabled.
I had a tens machine which caused me excruitiating pain. This was because doctors were telling me that my problems were muscular when infact I had 4 fractured vertebrae due to undiagnosed osteoporosis! Every time I used the machine it sent the muscles round the fractured vertebrae into spasm thus causing further crushing of the bones. However my mum used a Tens machine and she found it extremely helpful for her muscle pains.

Eun
Shari wrote:Hi Laura... EMS (Electronic Muscle Stimulation) will stimulate muscle, whereas TENS (Transacutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) is used more for pain relief.

Whether EMS will restore flexibility after 2 years is doubtful, but it may help prevent further muscle atrophication. You would need to try it very gently at first, to test how well or even if his muscles respond after so long, because you could cause injury or discomfort if you do too much too soon.

Is there no-one other than your Mum who could do his physio with him?

I hope this helps x
Hi Shari
Thank you so much for replying. I am having some technical difficulties(old phone) and only saw your post today. In answer to your question, my mother has some help but the physio should be done gently and repeatedly, so sporradic help probably wouldnt show results. Thats why i am trying to find an alternative that she could use on my father without help. Of course i dont want to suggest something that could hurt him.
bowlingbun wrote:After a knee replacement, my knee was very swollen. I took advice from our pharmacy and bought a Circulation Booster. Cost about £170, but worth every penny. You just sit with your feet on it, and then set the machine to the right strength. At the highest strength the muscles are visible contracting. You can't use one if you have a pacemaker, VAT free is you are disabled.
Hi Bowlingbun
Thank you very much for your experience and advice..especially about the vat..useful to know.
Eun wrote:I had a tens machine which caused me excruitiating pain. This was because doctors were telling me that my problems were muscular when infact I had 4 fractured vertebrae due to undiagnosed osteoporosis! Every time I used the machine it sent the muscles round the fractured vertebrae into spasm thus causing further crushing of the bones. However my mum used a Tens machine and she found it extremely helpful for her muscle pains.

Eun
Hi Eun
Thank you for your reply
Why doesn't Tens work for everybody? I tried it out and it didn't worked for me