Advice on lifting please

Share your ideas about the practical side of caring.
If you are confident in the move you are about to make and the caree trusts you and understands what is happening, it`s half the battle.
Spot on Meg. If you don't get that right, the rest doesn't matter. You can't do anything with or for anyone without their trust.
Pity that is not the first thing taught nowadays. Practice the skill to the best of your ability and be confident carrying out the task. It also works a treat with illegally parked blue badge holders.!!

Take care
Meg
We have two methods for lifting my tetraplegic hubby. From wheelchair to bed, from bed to wheelchair and from either to shower, we use a Freeway mobile hoist. Electric arm and slings which move up and down at the touch of a button, moves freely on wheels (looks like a garage mechanic's engine hoist). All we do is WD40 the wheels sometimes and put the battery on charge every week. We even have a maintenance plan for it with a company in Yorkshire. Hubby even stays in it to have a shower, because he can't use a shower chair (has no body balance control). From wheelchair to front passenger car seat and back again, we use a slider board (as already mentioned). We push it under hubby's bottom and grab some trouser material and SLIDE him across. There isn't any lifting required and in fact, if anyone does try to LIFT HIM, it all goes wrong. The spinal unit recommended a slider board (sometimes called banana boards, which are curved - ours is straight, because he slides off the front of the banana boards straight on the ground between the wheelchair and the car sill). They recommend them, because of the SLIDE FACTOR - NO LIFTING. The only time it's a bit difficult is when it's been raining/snowing/etc. and hubby's trousers are wet. Then, with all wet things, he tends to stick to the board, but then you just have to pull a bit harder. Even then, no lifting required. People like Ableworld have sliderboards, but for hoists, look up their websites BUT see your OT or GP FIRST. They can be paid for by NHS or Direct Payments or a mixture of both. A rep will be willing to see you and in some places there are centres where you can go and have a try at hoists etc. before you find the right one for you (they're not cheap obviously). The main rule for anyone, especially your dad is DO NOT TRY AND LIFT SOMEONE UP FROM THE FLOOR, CALL AN AMBULANCE. A fallen person could have sustained more injuries than you might think are apparant and you could make them worse by trying to lift them up ie. an 'invisible' broken rib, or arm, finger etc. Make them comfortable as previously said, and call the ambulance. Oh, and the wheelchair goes in the boot of the car or whatever you've got. Lots of people dislike travelling in their wheelchairs and would prefer to travel sitting in a passenger seat. My hubby feels very vulnerable travelling in his wheelchair, which he used to do in the early days, 15 years later he has learnt better ways.
Hi all, local Carers Centres can put you in touch with sessions on moving and handling.
They are delivered by the MS society here in Ayrshire.

Maybe worth phoning them to see if they've got anything doing? Image Image

marie x
As well as the MS society, I've had lots of help from my OT (nhs, not ss) on lifting techniques, so yours might be worth a try too.
make sure ye bend ur knees whilst lifting cus knees r desigened to take the weight. I recently went on crutches cus i lifted the wrong way an lots better now after 4 phisio sesssons. Lifting heavy shopping messed up joint on my spine OUCH!!
My Social Worker has organised someone to come and see me at home next Monday to teach me some lifting techniques, even though I have been lifting Mum for 4 years. The Carers Centre also runs courses. I cannot have a hoist at home due to H & S rules as my Mum has Dementia and I am a lone carer.
Bluebird
The guy came last week to show me how to lift Mum and all I can say is 'what a waste of time' . He knew how to lift safely, but no idea how to input it into my life as a carer for someone who is bed bound and suffering from severe Vascular Dementia. Nevermind, at least I can say I tried and now I'll just go back to doing what I have already be doing.
Bluebird Image
Sorry it was no help at all, Bluebird Image