IM new and need PIP advise for my daughter

Tell us a bit about yourself here.
My daughter has adhd ,conduct disorder,autism,ocd,anxiety,depression.
she has had DLA form many years shes now aged nearly 21 and since pip took over shes gone threw the whole lot to tribunal were they made her feel so bad that she ran out crying twice due to lack of understanding questions.it was still refused she struggles massively on very little esa benefits now can she re apply ? i really dont want her to go threw the face to face again as it makes her alot worse
How very distressing for her. I guess you have to bear in mind that these assessements are not about finding reasons to award PIP, but about finding reasons to deny it! ie, it's all about saving money, and only giving it out 'grudgingly' to anyone.

All I can say from my own meagre experience (luckily, there are folk here who know the systm inside out and will answer you shortly, I'm sure), is that when my niece was recently assessed for quite similar ailments (though there were some physical ones too, including IBS and fibromyalgia - but both, note, 'subjective' ailments), she was able to have her partner with her during the hearing, and that most definitely helped. They had a lot of paperwork prepared as well.

It's a very daunting situation, though, and it would be bad enough having to be there with physical ailments which are 'indisputable' (eg, a wheelchair?), let alone ones that are more 'vague' as anything MH or neurological 'could' be interpreted (by LAs desperate to save money).

Ironically, your daughter's very distress should have indicated how very real her conditions are.....

I hope others here will guide you through 'What to do next', towards a more positive outcome for your daughter.
My partner is currently receiving DLA and we have not yet reached the point where he has been told he has to claim PIP instead. When that time comes we will head straight for the guides on the website Benefits and Work. You have to pay to join the site but for us it has been well worth it. When he applied for ESA we used them extensively. They are written by legally trained professionals and explain the basis on which the benefits are awarded, how the wording of the application forms relates to the actual legislation and gives lots more helpful advice. Here is a link if you want to have a look at it http://www.benefitsandwork.co.uk/. Well, that is supposed to be a link but I am not that tech savvy and can't be sure I have done it properly..... Good luck.
Although I haven't had need to use the Carers UK helpline myself, it is usually recommended here, as the experts there have a lot of the knowledge as to how the rules apply and how to navigate them. We are usually recommened to email rather than try and get through on the helpline which is often very busy. I'm told that the email will get a reply in a day or two.

The forum members who use the experts at Carers UK usually say they are great! One member always praises them for making her better off by £50 a week! :)

(So far as I know, it's completely free to use the Carers UK Helpline/email consultation, but you may need to be formal member of Carers UK, rather than just a forum user?? Not sure - others here will know.)
I have an idea that they are supposed to make some sort of special provision for people who might experience severe distress, but not sure where I read it. I'm always happy to sing the praises of our own helpline, but feel that on this occasion it might be worth getting in touch with something like the National Autistic Society, because I suspect they may well have been asked for advice from others with similar problems.
Those interviews would be daunting for anyone, let alone someone so young, with so many MH problems to cope with! Plus the fact your are put 'on trial' for 'daring' to ask for benefits........

I think the suggestion to try the specialist organisations for your daughter's conditions about 'what to do next' is very good.

I've read somewhere along the way that these days, any application for any benefits is 'automatically' turned down, forcing the applicant to reapply. It's all part of policty to 'filibuster' and if they can't avoid paying out, at least to delay it. That said, I believe payments WILL be 'backpaid'. This certainly happened to my relative - she got a lump sum to cover the 'gap' from when she first applied, plus of course, the continuing payment. I do hope this will be the same for your daughter.
jenny lucas wrote:
(So far as I know, it's completely free to use the Carers UK Helpline/email consultation, but you may need to be formal member of Carers UK, rather than just a forum user?? Not sure - others here will know.)
yes it is free to use and you don't have to be a forum member, or even a member of CUK to use it.
Need expert advice? You can talk to the Carers UK Adviceline five days a week, no matter where you are in the UK or how complex your query is. We do benefits checks and advise on financial and practical matters related to caring.

0808 808 7777
advice@carersuk.org
Open Monday to Friday, 10am to 4pm

The Carers UK Adviceline also includes a listening service, there for you to talk through your caring situation with a trained volunteer who understands what you are going through. Available Mondays and Tuesdays, from 9am to 7pm.


If you can’t get through on the phones (lines are often oversubscribed) then send them an email, they’ll usually get back to you within 3-5 working days.
Hi, I have a 25 year old son with ASD, ADHD and dyspraxia. He was referred to the local mental health service and is now under the district ADHD and Aspergers team who send support workers to assess the clients needs and he goes to appointments with the mental health team, less often now. The support workers are great for helping with PIP. Is your daughter under the local mental health team, because they will arrange all this? If not get a referral from your GP. Good luck.
I qualify and get PIP.

The CAB helped me fill the form in. and then a Health professional visited me in my home and asked me a lot of questions. I liked the person, I think she was very understanding of my medical condition.

I think she could see that I was genuine.
You get awarded points in a number of categories of performance, then they total up all the points, and
at certain number of points you get awarded PIP