prescriptions

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My friend has given up work to care for her father in law but doesnt claim any benefits aprt from carers allowance, is she entititled to free precriptions?
I don't know - but there will be folk here who do.

Why did she give up work for her father in law? It could be a VERY expensive decision for her???

How long is she likely to have to go on caring for him? Months, years, decades??

It's hard to 'think ahead' when you first become a carer, but so many of us made 'kneejerk' decisions that SEEMED 'sensible' at the time, but proved to be hideously 'wrong' as time went by (and went by, and went by, and went by.....)

Why does her FIL need care?

In families, so very often a 'spare female' (usually female, not always) is 'cast' in the role of 'carer' simply for the convenience of all the other members of the family......(ie, so THEY don't have to lift a finger!)
On it's tod , NO.

CA is NOT a qualifying benefit for free prescriptions ... only certain INCOME related ones.
Am I entitled to free prescriptions?

You can get free NHS prescriptions if, at the time the prescription is dispensed, you:

are 60 or over
are under 16
are 16 to 18 and in full-time education
are pregnant or have had a baby in the previous 12 months and have a valid maternity exemption certificate (MatEx)
have a specified medical condition and have a valid medical exemption certificate (MedEx)
have a continuing physical disability that prevents you going out without help from another person and have a valid MedEx
hold a valid war pension exemption certificate and the prescription is for your accepted disability
are an NHS inpatient

You're also entitled to free prescriptions if you or your partner – including civil partner – receive, or you're under the age of 20 and the dependant of someone receiving:

Income Support
Income-based Jobseeker's Allowance
Income-related Employment and Support Allowance
Pension Credit Guarantee Credit
Universal Credit and meet the criteria

If you're entitled to or named on:

a valid NHS tax credit exemption certificate – if you don't have a certificate, you can show your award notice; you qualify if you get Child Tax Credits, Working Tax Credits with a disability element (or both), and have income for tax credit purposes of £15,276 or less
a valid NHS certificate for full help with health costs (HC2)

People named on an NHS certificate for partial help with health costs (HC3) may also get help.

Find out more about the NHS Low Income Scheme (LIS).

People with certain medical conditions can get free NHS prescriptions if:

they have one of the conditions listed below, and
they hold a valid medical exemption certificate

Medical exemption certificates are issued on application to people who have:

a permanent fistula (for example, a caecostomy, colostomy, laryngostomy or ileostomy) requiring continuous surgical dressing or requiring an appliance
a form of hypoadrenalism (for example, Addison's disease) for which specific substitution therapy is essential
diabetes insipidus or other forms of hypopituitarism
diabetes mellitus, except where treatment is by diet alone
hypoparathyroidism
myasthenia gravis
myxoedema (hypothyroidism requiring thyroid hormone replacement)
epilepsy requiring continuous anticonvulsive therapy
a continuing physical disability that means the person can't go out without the help of another person – temporary disabilities don't count, even if they last for several months

They are also issued for people undergoing treatment for cancer:

including the effects of cancer, or
the effects of current or previous cancer treatment

Read the medical exemption certificate FAQ.


ONLINE ELIGIBILTY CHECKER :

https://services.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/check-fo ... e-you-live
When my husband had a low paid job, we qualified for free prescriptions on the grounds of low income - note the bit about an income of under £15,000 a year, easy to miss.

If your friend has limited savings, she would possibly be entitled to income support or similar (if you are in receipt of CA you are NOT required to look for work), and then if in receipt of IS she would automatically be entitled to free prescriptions on that basis.

Make sure she has a Carers Assessment and dad has a Needs Assessment. Under certain circumstances dad might be able to get Direct Payments, but that's a big subject!

If dad has dementia, he is exempt from Council Tax from the date of diagnosis.