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Carers UK Forum • Advice on a bariatric bed pan for the big job - Page 2
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Re: Advice on a bariatric bed pan for the big job

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:47 am
by Greta
I don't understand what the continence nurse meant by 'on Rio'.

The carers should know all about this too and be responsible for cleaning.

You didn't mention that you had pads, Indira. So here is more detail: pads ('nappies') for the main problem, but also square sheets, disposable, to catch the rest, and also washable square sheets below that. You presumably know how to find incontinence products already. This is the firm we used, because they were local. They were one among many and may not be useful for you:

https://www.drilineservices.co.uk/

And here's a more useful website advertising on Google:
http://www.incontinencechoice.co.uk/?gc ... 0wodF6gJDw

Look at 'bed pads and draw sheets'.

We used thin disposable ones and also thicker disposable ones, more expensive, by Lille.

However, I don't think it's acceptable for no financial assessment to be done. It puts too much pressure on you.

Re: Advice on a bariatric bed pan for the big job

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:50 am
by Albert_1604
Cannot make any suggestions but one thing, I take it that you have
a large plastic sheet under your mother covering the whole bed.

In this way, if the worst happens, at least the bed, sheets and mattress
will remain dry.

Edit,added........... This might be a silly thought but garden centres sell very large plastic trays which are very shallow.
If the top of the sides were not sharp one could push the tray under. If tops were sharp one could tape cloth all round to soften it.
Just a thought.

Re: Advice on a bariatric bed pan for the big job

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 12:59 pm
by Indira_1703
jenny lucas wrote:Indira, in terms of financial assessment to see whether your mum is eligible for 'free' carers, one obvious question is 'Does she own the house/flat she is living in?' If she does, then I would say that she is 'automatically' above the threshold for free care? (Others here will know).

Who is in charge of her finances? Who is paying household bills (eg, electricity, food, and so on). If she is bedbound, presumably she can't get to a bank etc. Does she write out cheques for bills, or are they paid 'automatically' out of her bank account?

Do you think your mum doesn't actually want 'anyone else' looking after her except you? Sadly, this is very common with the elderly - but they fail to realise that it becomes IMPOSSIBLE for one daughter alone to do all that needs to be done.

She may not want to pay for outside help because she wants to 'conserve' her money, or even to be able to pass it on to you when the time comes, but right now, the MOST important thing in her life is being well looked after and that should not be by you alone- she needs to spend some of her money in getting YOU the help you need! This is essential if there is no one else in the family available to help you look after her.

It does sound, you know, like the situation is becoming difficult to the point of impossible for you to manage. What will happen when your mum gets even weaker? Sadly, that is going to be inevitable as time passes.

You CANNOT be expected to look after your mum for the rest of her life single handed, and she cannot expect you to do it. It isn't fair on you....

However much you love her, and however dedicated you are, you need help.

Kindest wishes, at a stressful time, Jenny
Yes, she does own her own flat. Thank you so much for your insight Jenny. Thank you for your kindness. There is so much to think about and so difficult to let go. I agree I need the help. I cannot understand why Social Services won't give me a straight answer as to costs. One day at a time.

Re: Advice on a bariatric bed pan for the big job

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 1:01 pm
by Indira_1703
Albert_1604 wrote:Cannot make any suggestions but one thing, I take it that you have
a large plastic sheet under your mother covering the whole bed.

In this way, if the worst happens, at least the bed, sheets and mattress
will remain dry.

Edit,added........... This might be a silly thought but garden centres sell very large plastic trays which are very shallow.
If the top of the sides were not sharp one could push the tray under. If tops were sharp one could tape cloth all round to soften it.
Just a thought.
Thank you Albert. It is a thought. We do have to be inventive. Who knows it might help someone else. Thank you again.

Re: Advice on a bariatric bed pan for the big job

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 1:06 pm
by Indira_1703
Greta wrote:I don't understand what the continence nurse meant by 'on Rio'.

The carers should know all about this too and be responsible for cleaning.

You didn't mention that you had pads, Indira. So here is more detail: pads ('nappies') for the main problem, but also square sheets, disposable, to catch the rest, and also washable square sheets below that. You presumably know how to find incontinence products already. This is the firm we used, because they were local. They were one among many and may not be useful for you:

https://www.drilineservices.co.uk/

And here's a more useful website advertising on Google:
http://www.incontinencechoice.co.uk/?gc ... 0wodF6gJDw

Look at 'bed pads and draw sheets'.

We used thin disposable ones and also thicker disposable ones, more expensive, by Lille.

However, I don't think it's acceptable for no financial assessment to be done. It puts too much pressure on you.
Thank you Greta. I have bought Lille pads, which are fantastic. I will look into the disposable square sheets. They would be perfect. I have a lot of absorbent mats which I used to use on mum's chair, on the floor and on her bed. I thank you for taking the time to give me your suggestions. Things have changed so quickly.

Re: Advice on a bariatric bed pan for the big job

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 1:20 pm
by bowlingbun
Indira, the first six weeks of care should be free. Then mum has a choice. Either she pays for and organises care for herself, because she needs it, OR she has a financial assessment. My mum had a very good civil service pension and contributed about £60 a week towards the carers, so at £15 an hour, she paid for four hours, but had about 21 hours a week. Mum should also qualify for Attendance Allowance. NONE of this is charity, as a teacher for 40 years, she's paid tax and national insurance for years. Now it's time for her to claim.
Make certain mum sorts out Power of Attorney, if she hasn't already.

Re: Advice on a bariatric bed pan for the big job

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 2:33 pm
by Elaine
Hi Indira
Your Mum doesn't have to have a financial assessment. My mother refused too. She just declared herself to be self funding. However if your Mum has more than the magic number, currently £23,250,00 I believe, in assets, (savings, bonds, in the bank etc), she will have to pay for any care herself whether the SS are involved or not.
My mum was also a large lady and the standard slings hurt her, the stand alone hoists were also awkward. After a consultation with the Occupational therapist, she was provided (on loan) with ceiling hoists, one in the bedroom and one in the living room and better quality slings. One of these slings was for toileting and the other for transport from one chair to another. The latter was very comfortable as she was able to keep her arms inside it. If that one was used for the commode, it had to be removed and replaced when finished, the toileting one allowed access for cleaning.
I suggest you explore the possibilities with hoists and slings to see if there is one that mum can tolerate. If there's no joy there then it might have to be continence products and cleaning in bed which isn't pleasant for anyone. If Mum had an overbed ceiling hoist then it should be possible to raise her sufficiently so that you can fit a bed pan underneath her. That might work?
KR
E.

Re: Advice on a bariatric bed pan for the big job

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 4:58 pm
by Albert_1604
This NHS site looks useful for various types of help
including medication for incontinence.
http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Incontinen ... tment.aspx

As well as nurses is your doctor in the loop too?

Re: Advice on a bariatric bed pan for the big job

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 5:41 pm
by bowlingbun
Yes, if mum has over about £23,000 she will have to pay for all her care, unless she has any money in a joint account with you, in which case only half counts. If she has just over that amount, she can't give you a few thousand to get below it, that's classed as "deprivation of capital" BUT she can use it to pay you the going rate of £10-£15 an hour, and on anything the house needs.

Re: Advice on a bariatric bed pan for the big job

Posted: Sun Mar 12, 2017 2:33 pm
by Indira_1703
Elaine wrote:Hi Indira
Your Mum doesn't have to have a financial assessment. My mother refused too. She just declared herself to be self funding. However if your Mum has more than the magic number, currently £23,250,00 I believe, in assets, (savings, bonds, in the bank etc), she will have to pay for any care herself whether the SS are involved or not.
My mum was also a large lady and the standard slings hurt her, the stand alone hoists were also awkward. After a consultation with the Occupational therapist, she was provided (on loan) with ceiling hoists, one in the bedroom and one in the living room and better quality slings. One of these slings was for toileting and the other for transport from one chair to another. The latter was very comfortable as she was able to keep her arms inside it. If that one was used for the commode, it had to be removed and replaced when finished, the toileting one allowed access for cleaning.
I suggest you explore the possibilities with hoists and slings to see if there is one that mum can tolerate. If there's no joy there then it might have to be continence products and cleaning in bed which isn't pleasant for anyone. If Mum had an overbed ceiling hoist then it should be possible to raise her sufficiently so that you can fit a bed pan underneath her. That might work?
KR
E.
Thank you so much Elaine. It is such a relief to hear from someone who has experienced the same and understands. Mum's whole body is in agony after hoisting. She has to deal with the pain that Parkinson's brings, her arthritic knees and the fractures in the leg (which has no cast). The OT unfortunately was very unsympathetic and acted as if mum was not co-operating. I will have to follow up on a more comfortable sling. Thank you once again re the costs etc. Forever grateful.