Disabled facilities grant

All about money
It's been suggested that we apply for a disabled facilities grant to create a wetroom instead of our conventional bathroom.

This is mainly because the OT dept seem to think it's OK for my wife to have a strip wash for the rest of her life and never have another shower or bath for as long as she lives. We both find this unacceptable.

I received the initial forms relating to the grant yesterday and unsurprisingly they want a very detailed account of our income and savings. I'm reluctant, but resigned to having to provide all of this if necessary, but I can't find anywhere any meaningful details of the means test applied to say what we'd get or what we might have to pay ourselves.

If our savings and income are sufficient to disbar us from getting a grant I'd rather not go through the laborious process of accessing all of our ISAs etc. to get the exact figures required.

The most info I can find is this:- Savings over £6,000 will be taken into account.
Depending on the assessment, the amount of financial assistance offered can vary up to 100% of the cost.

It's not very helpful.

If we said somewhere between £10k and £15k for a complete bathroom makeover, how much do I have to have before the grant is zero?
Internet search .... DISABLED FACILITIES GRANT ... throws up several sites with guidance thereon.

Pick of the bunch ?

Disability Rights and SCOPE ... several others available :

https://www.disabilityrightsuk.org/housing-grants


https://www.scope.org.uk/support/disabl ... ties-grant

I trust that the above links will assist.
Chris From The Gulag wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:49 am
Internet search .... DISABLED FACILITIES GRANT ... throws up several sites with guidance thereon.

Pick of the bunch ?

Disability Rights and SCOPE ... several others available :

https://www.disabilityrightsuk.org/housing-grants


https://www.scope.org.uk/support/disabl ... ties-grant

I trust that the above links will assist.
Thanks Chris, I agree there's guidance there, but unfortunately I can find no more info about figures than I found before. i.e.
The income and savings test is similar, but not identical, to that for means-tested benefits (such as income support or pension credit). In all cases, the first £6,000 of any savings are ignored.

If the disabled person's income and savings are below the test limits, there will be no need for them to contribute to the cost of the works.

If the disabled person's income and savings are more than the test limits, then a contribution will be required from them towards the cost of the works.
Does this mean that we come back to the general £23,000 savings figure (got more than that in Premium Bonds) which seems to disbar you from most things?

It's not mentioned anywhere as a figure.

What are the "test limits" and how do I find them?

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OK, a bit more searching and I've found this on the first link:-
If you are a home owner, you can get a grant for:

structural adaptations to a house which are essential to a disabled person's needs; or
providing standard amenities intended to meet the needs of a disabled person - such as a fixed bath or shower, wash-hand basin or sink or a toilet.

The grant will be 100% of approved costs if the you or a member of your household get income support, income-based jobseeker's allowance, the guarantee credit of pension credit or income-related employment and support allowance.
In other cases, the minimum grant will be 80%.
Have I actually found the correct info there? It seems too good to be true that they'll pay 80% no matter how much we have squirrelled away.
For clarity :

The Disability Rights UK have helplines , SCOPE have online forums monitored by trained legal advisors.

Links provided earlier ... the above sections available elsewhere on those sites.

One thought ... the dreaded post code lottery MAY come into play.
Thanks again Chris, I'll keep digging

It's unusual that this sort of info is not prominent somewhere once you start looking, that just doesn't seem to be the case here.
A case of information overload allied with a dysfunctional benefits system ???

A simple question like ... " What grants are available to family carers ? "

Imagine the problem ... for starters ... all family carers , or just ones able to claim CA ?

Kinship carers ... included or excluded under " Family " carers for some grants ?

And that's the first problem ... the way the question was phrased !

The answer to most things is out there , the problem is knowing which question to ask !!!!
Although each case will be unique as each couple/families income will differ, you would think councils would have some sort of tier system available. That way if you worked it out yourself and landed between certain monetary levels of income/savings/benefits, you would know whether worth applying.

This link below is from our council website, yours should have similar
https://www.southtyneside.gov.uk/articl ... ties-Grant
How much do I get?

The amount paid is usually based on a financial assessment (a 'means test') of your average weekly income, and takes into account any savings, capital, investments etc. However when the adaptation is for a disabled children under 19, the means test is not required.

Means testing will take into account savings above a certain limit. Capital is included in the means test. The first £6,000 of savings is disregarded.

If you have a partner, your combined income will be assessed jointly
. A range of premiums and allowances are used for all essential outgoings, for example, rent/mortgage and personal expenditure. Actual outgoings are not taken into consideration.

If you receive Disability Living Allowance, Attendance Allowance or Personal Independence Payment this will not be taken into account as income. Other benefits such as Income Support, Universal Credit, Guaranteed Pension Credit, Housing Benefit, Employment and Support Allowance (Income Based), Income based jobseeker's Allowance, Working or Child Tax Credit assessed as earning less than £15,050 per year, will allow you to be eligible for a 100% grant.

Depending on the outcome of the financial assessment the amount of grant assistance offered can vary from 0 - 100% of the cost to provide the recommended adaptation
.

Your OT may know further details or ask your local councillor.

If you find out your income etc takes you over the threshold, try this link. You can sometimes find help based on past/current employment. I would imagine they will all do financial assessments too though.
https://grants-search.turn2us.org.uk/

A lady I know received the DFG for a wetroom but turned out she decided to move to a bungalow after a few years. If memory serves me right she had to pay DFG back, as she failed one of the criteria of staying in her original house for 5 yrs after the work was done. I will ask her when I see her next.
rosemary wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 12:09 pm
Although each case will be unique as each couple/families income will differ, you would think councils would have some sort of tier system available. That way if you worked it out yourself and landed between certain monetary levels of income/savings/benefits, you would know whether worth applying.
That's all I'm looking for really.

I think the idea is a non-starter as I feel the bathroom is too small to take a wheelchair accessible shower enclosure and too small be a full wet room, (the loo seat will be permanently wet - yucky).

It may be better to just get a floor mounted hoist to lift her onto a bath seat.

I'm going to check out some designs before spraying my entire financial details all around the Council offices.
I'm in a similar position in wanting to provide an extension to accomodate a larger upstairs bathroom with a wetroom and a downstairs toilet. We are both disabled but my income and savings bar us from most benefits and I can find no information on upper limits for this grant. Like you I am reluctant to go through a financial assessment if there is no chance of qualifying in the first place.
My ensuite was built to be wheelchair friendly, in future. I found all the details for design on the Disabled Living Foundation website. I've always been a Hippo that likes a nightly bath, so I chose a bath with lower sides than average with grab handles, and a shower over, which is fine for me, but conversion costs to a shower would be minimal.
My son converted my garage for me, and the cost of the bathroom was pretty minimal too, after some pretty extortionate quotes.

My favourite bit is actually the extra tall toilet, so much easier for me. It's 2" taller than average, but not one of the typical disabled monstrosities. The walls on my bathroom are all reinforced with plywood wherever I'll need a grab handle in future.

I made a mistake with the door, going into the room, rather than out of, but it was completed only a couple of weeks before a major op, I was too ill and tired to concentrate by then! It's going to be turned round very soon, so that if I collapse in the bathroom, it will be easier to get me out.

The door is enormously wide, I think it's about 3 feet wide, so access will always be easy with wheelchair and Zimmer.