[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/phpbb/session.php on line 585: sizeof(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/phpbb/session.php on line 641: sizeof(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable
Who will offer disabled people a job - Carers UK Forum

Who will offer disabled people a job

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
Comments have already been added

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/commen ... 379939.ece

Hurray! The welcome was almost universal. The disabled would be helped into work, the benefits bill slashed, a James Purnell Jerusalem would spread throughout the crippled land.

Business leaders welcomed it - if the prospective employees are employable. The Conservatives welcomed it; even the Liberal Democrats sort of did. With the predictable exception of the unions, everyone accepts the basic principle that the disabled - whether they have a bad back, depression or epilepsy - should be encouraged to get off incapacity benefit and go to work if they possibly can. Across the media there is agreement: more stick, less carrot, the Daily Mail demanded; higher benefits too, The Guardian said. But the fundamental premise was unquestioned: they should be in work.

Er, where? There is a yawning gap beneath this paper-thin consensus - and it is where all the jobs should be. I read the leading articles yesterday and I thought: I have worked in journalism for almost 20 years and I have never knowingly had a colleague who was registered as disabled. The Guardian stands out in employing a deaf journalist and one or two wheelchair-users. But plenty of jobs on newspapers could be done by somebody unable to hear well, depressed (all those death announcements...) or physically hampered. I checked with colleagues on The Times, The Independent, the Daily Telegraph, the papers most positive about the Purnell proposals: any disabled colleagues out there? Nope. None that anyone could recall. We all cheer the principle, but who is going to put it into practice?

When people demand that the disabled - and I'm talking about the genuinely incapacitated here, not the malingerers - should work, they generally mean that they should do rubbish jobs for rubbish money. Fill the call centres with cripples. Dogsbody jobs for the deaf; boring ones for the blind, they can't see anyway. But where are the decent job offers?

Background
Welfare reform has been a long time coming
Back to Beveridge
Giving the jobless capacity for change
Incapacity benefit and income support to be axed
Who wants to take on somebody like Tracey, who posted this on the BBC Ouch website for the disabled on Monday: “I don't mind going to work if the company can supply a darkened room I can use when I get a migraine. An ambulance on standby, just in case my epilepsy lasts longer than 20 minutes (sometimes unconscious and stop breathing because of muscle spasms), three seizures per week. Arthritis in elbow, hip and knee, so can't stand for more than one hour. And brain AVM, which causes tinnitus, and hard of hearing (two hearing aids). Can't wait to see what job I end up with.â€Â
I recommend the Ouch messageboards (www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mbouch/). Its contributors unwittingly sum up exactly why so many companies avoid employing the disabled - too many are negative, aggressive, socially excluded and ready to take offence.

Tell me about it!!! Image I tried to tell it from the carer's point of view but fell foul of a number of the posters, so I won't bother posting on that forum again!
Perhaps, Sarniajoy, we are not so much negative, aggressive, socially excluded and ready to take offence but realistic? Until you walk in someone else's shoes...
Perhaps, Sarniajoy, we are not so much negative, aggressive, socially excluded and ready to take offence but realistic? Until you walk in someone else's shoes...
I wouldn't employ some of the people on Ouch and that is a fact. They think the world owes them a living, which it doesn't! It is sad if you are disabled, it is also sad if you have to care for a disabled person, but life isn't fair! You have to make the best of life with the cards you are dealt and get on with it!
what i want to know if they send disabled people into work are they going to ensure and have insurance that the work is not going to make their disability worse, ie compensation for damaging them more.

carers should be classed as working, yes, and should be paid a decent wage to do so, if it wasn't for us the government would have a lot of neglected people in society. carers sometimes have no choice but to give up their own lives to help others, sometimes because no one else will.
what i want to know if they send disabled people into work are they going to ensure and have insurance that the work is not going to make their disability worse, ie compensation for damaging them more.
hi babybonnie,
well, we don't know the answer, we are just carers too here, so what do you think should happen? Do you think it would need special insurance for a disabled person with both legs amputated to run a large corporation worth £500M like David Murray, a blind person to become a Government Minister like David Blunkett, or a deaf person to become a composer like Beethoven for example?
If a disabled person is the best person for the job I would have no hesitation about employing them. I would not employ anyone out of pity.
what i want to know if they send disabled people into work are they going to ensure and have insurance that the work is not going to make their disability worse, ie compensation for damaging them more.
hi babybonnie,
well, we don't know the answer, we are just carers too here, so what do you think should happen? Do you think it would need special insurance for a disabled person with both legs amputated to run a large corporation worth £500M like David Murray, a blind person to become a Government Minister like David Blunkett, or a deaf person to become a composer like Beethoven for example?
hi i think you may have got me wrong i'm not saying all people with disabilties should get compensation, just suggesting that many suffers who live with chronic pain each day will have their pain /disability made worse by working. alot of people who are disabled although diliberating have no pain at all. i know of a consulatant who treats my husband he is severly disabled and he works, but has no pain. he was born with his disabilty and is more excepting of it. i don't know the answer my self. each case is individual and there is no one answer.what would you do/ could you do. its the carers that the goverment are targeting first and where will that leave the disabled person. it would cost them more to hire trained carers/ nurses to do the work we do.
I suspect that the people you quote, Excalibur, have assistance that most of the disabled people that the government is talking about getting into work will not have, Blunkett certainly has, so it's impossible to equate one group with the other. Let's face it the government has abolished disability, not eradicated it, not even they can do that but abolished it.

And it's easy to look for negative stereotypes as the Times article has but there are equally disabled people who do "get on with it" within the capacity they have and push the barriers without needing to be persuaded that this is what they should be doing, they got on with it before and they'll continue to get on with it but that doesn't mean that they have to passively accept the ordure that's thrown at them and this includes the negative stereotypes and implication that they're lazy rather than genuinely incapable of carrying out the tasks that able-bodied people take for granted. Criticism of the government's policies and other people's attitudes does not per se constitute whinging, or perhaps they should remain silent in which case perhaps those who care for them should remain silent too?
Totally agree with you Annie

Times bloke wrote:
But most of all we need a shift in culture and attitude, among the disabled
Is there such a thing as a culture and attitude among the disabled, no more than there is a culture and attitude among non disabled....we're all just people with different attitudes, beliefs and cultures...

Did my husband's culture and attitude change when he became disabled? he worked full time before his brain haemorrhage..now there is no way he can work...but not because of his culture and attitude....

Take this board...we're all carers...we have that in common...but we don't all have the same attitude to life....what we do share to some extent is the experience of being a carer in this society..

and that is what people with disabilities share to some extent......the experience of being disabled in this society...not a culture and attitude

this guy is being as guilty of stereotyping people with disabilities as the employers he is criticising.