[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/phpbb/session.php on line 585: sizeof(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/phpbb/session.php on line 641: sizeof(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable
Who controls your life? - Page 2 - Carers UK Forum

Who controls your life?

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
71 posts
Seems very relevant to me Audrey. What I think you are saying is that globalisation of the labour market brings potential advantages to the privileged who are able to take advantage of it, but fragments families and communities leaving the poor and those without negotiable skills or money in a worse situation. And I don't disagree: its clearly true. Smaller families and the loss of extended social and community networks through migration undoubtedly results in many carers becoming in effect prisoners in their own home. I wouldn't get all dewy eyed and sentimental about this change though, life before the world started to open new opportunities for migration was pretty miserable for many people too. In villages like this, "going down the pit" - or joining the army - were the only options for most young men and women were mainly cheap labour or stayed at home. And the massive improvements in nutrition, affluence, and medicine have resulted in the extension of life way past expectations in 1945 or even 1965.

Given these demographic changes, the welfare state is if anything, becoming even more critical than in 1945. And - properly funded and managed - social care also offers relief from the drudgery of unpaid caring, and a useful career ladder to millions of others, at a time when manufacturing, finance, service and extractive industries are becoming increasingly mechanised.

"Welfare dependency" - I'm sorry if you dont like the term Annie, but it is in popular parlance. Any decent government tries to reduce the number of people who rely completely on the State, for lots of good reasons, not least that we all want to be independent and pay our own way through life, with the State providing a safety net in times of acute need, not a lifelong, all encompassing and suffocating trap.
I am struggling here because i dont think i am completely understanding - or believing - your post Scally.

"individual tenacity and courage" ........ are you saying the lack of these is the fundamental cause of economic and social problems? If so, do you mean specifically so in relation to carers??
No, not at all. I don't know any carers in that sitution at all, and anyway the benefits are far too miserable to make slacking off an option. I was talking about some, mainly older people with particular disabilities who appear to just give up trying - using the weak argument that "there are no jobs anyway, so why bother trying, its easier to get signed off as sick". Thatcher colluded with this back in the 1980's to massage the unemployment figures, and we are still paying the price.
No, not at all. I don't know any carers in that sitution at all, and anyway the benefits are far too miserable to make slacking off an option. I was talking about some, mainly older people with particular disabilities who appear to just give up trying - using the weak argument that "there are no jobs anyway, so why bother trying, its easier to get signed off as sick". Thatcher colluded with this back in the 1980's to massage the unemployment figures, and we are still paying the price.
Do you actually have any hard, not anecdotal, evidence to back this up, Scally?
I can give an example of this, as I worked in the Jobcentres at the time.

I interviewed a guy who was signing unemployed - he was 57. His breathing was terrible. I suggested he see the doctor - nothing more. He came back with a sick note for 13 weeks: he had bronchial asthma, a dodgy heart rhythm, dangerously high blood pressure and it turned out later that he also had diabetes, none of which had been picked up previously.

His was the most extreme example, but there were many others like him who had no idea they had such poor health. Most would have suddenly collapsed, with the "not a day's illness in his life" epitaph.

The instructions we received were very clear: only refer people to their doctor - and only those you suspect should not be seeking work due to ill health. Never suggest they are unfit to work - that is their doctor's decision.

If that's encouraging people to be idle, I must have missed something - and frankly the chances are that by getting this guy down to his doctor, I may have lengthened his life.

So sue me for keeping him on benefits Image .
bronchial asthma, a dodgy heart rhythm, dangerously high blood pressure and it turned out later that he also had diabetes, none of which had been picked up previously.
Most of which are, in many cases, both potentially preventable and treatable, Charles. Unhealthy lifestyles. So why arent we doing more to improve the quality of life of folk on long term disability, by linking benefits to compliance with specific lifestyle programmes? I know the bleeding hearts Guardian reading brigade on here will hammer me (again!) but the fact is that simply pouring benefits at this problem without any kind of expectation or return hasnt worked and is doing a dis-service to both the individuals and society. To really care, you need to be tough sometimes. Three mornings a week doing useful light community work like mowing pensioners lawns or helping out in some other way in return for benefits would soon see an improvement in both physical and mental health. And no, I'm not talking about folk at deaths door, as you know fine well Image
Oh for goodness sake, Scally, lucky you to be fit enough, sufficiently well-off and to have a sufficiently undemanding caring role to be able lead a healthy lifestyle and sit in judgement on those who do not have the same opportunies, perhaps we can tell the paralysed to pick up their beds and walk in exchange for their benefits, after all walking is good for you Image .
Well, if it worked for Jesus, Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image
you are not allowed to use mythical figures as an example
I have to say I find most of scally's posts offensive......
I have to say I find most of scally's posts offensive......
He is playing devil's advocate a lot of the time but sometimes other people do not see it as a game and this is not a good time to make these types of remarks whatever the reason for them because people with disabilities are getting these comments from the government and in the right-wing press and our futures are very uncertain. And yes, Scally, I do read The Guardian. And The Telegraph. And The Sun. And The Daily Mail and The Express. And a few other online publications as well but I am not willing to increase Murdoch's profits by paying to read The Times or the News of the World.
71 posts