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Welfare Refrorm: Mapping the Route Towards Full Employment - Page 2 - Carers UK Forum

Welfare Refrorm: Mapping the Route Towards Full Employment

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
Totally agree with you Cheril, well said.

If they are supporting carers back to work who is going to support the caree - not Social Services that's for sure, and how would we be better off when we will have to pay for someone to look after caree while we are at work, because it would take all of our earnings and plus to pay for a service.
Totally agree with you Cheril, well said.

If they are supporting carers back to work who is going to support the caree - not Social Services that's for sure, and how would we be better off when we will have to pay for someone to look after caree while we are at work, because it would take all of our earnings and plus to pay for a service.
I have this sense of deju-vu about this whole argument - isnt this exactly the kind of argument that was put forward thirty years ago by folk moaning about mothers going out to work and putting their kids in the hands of paid carers?

Yet.... there aren't that many mothers who really want to go back to the old stay-at-home days.

I have a feeling that I am swimming a bit against the current on this particular list - but there is a bigger tide out there - and the economic benefits of sharing the care should be very evident.

Caring is a very wide spectrum - one rule doesn't suit all. My own three kids were in nursery from a few months old, then various afterschool care arrangement, and they are bright, caring and sensible young people now, with no evidence of any emotional malfunctioning. Likewise, we have used a flexible mix of paid carers and statutory respite side by side for most of the last fifteen years. The result has been that my family has not suffered poverty, and my wife and I have maintained our - not particularly spectacular but worthwhile - careers throughout. It has been a juggling match at times, but it worked for us, and whilst we don't have any savings, we have never been in debt either, and if the washing machine breaks down, there isn't a crisis, it just gets replaced.

Q: does that make us bad carers and parents? Answers on one side of the paper only please...!
Iam no expert on child care or child benefits or just what help you get towards paying for child care my niece gets all sorts of child care benefits and tax credits but as ive said no idea what she gets .


but the problem with carers who gave up work and are quite happy to work 24/7- if they were "encouraged " to return to work what would it cost the state carer at work for 8 hours per day so the local authority supply care worker to look after my caree( ive just this week been told due to " high income " thats my pension and caree`s war related pensions respite care and sitting service is means tested )sitting service costs £15 per hour do they want me to pay local authority care worker £15 per hour to enable me to work for £6 £10 £15 per hour does it make sense to you.
Even if it were free can you honestly believe that the local authority will pay £15 per hour so i can go out to work .
We also should remember what happens when we get home from work will we be free from care work or will the local authority supply care worker through the night to allow me to get some sleep before my next day at work .
Many of us do not want to work its not that we can not work but we want to give our elderly/young disabled relatives the best care available and to many of us its got to be within the family unit we should be regarded as part of the social care framework and paid accordingly .
We dont want cash to pay someone else to look after our caree`s we want the wage that we are entitled to for the work we do .
GEORGE
I have been both a "working" Carer, and a "Stay-at-home" Carer. When my children were young, my late mother was happy to step in, if my husband was too ill to manage. I was also fortunate to be a nurse, working just nights.My mother died and I tried carrying on working, but it is not always the physical worries.I used to leave the phone number of the ward I worked on,with my 8 year old son, in case my husband became ill during the night, because there was no other way to do it.

When I was able to go out to work, we did not have to worry about where our funds were coming from, and there were even times when we were a bit short that I worked in a nursing home too. Staying at home constantly leaves me low, depressed, physically weak,going from someone looked on as an "angel" in Society, to someone looked on as a "nothing".

I have thought about going back to work, if I could get direct payments etc set up, but in the last two weeks, my son has not been picked up three times, as he has been forgotten. How can any Carers get outside work with the constant stress. Also with the possiblity of strikes over the summer, our cared for may not have access to day centres anyway.

I have met other Carers who would be totally unable to go out to work, due to the hard physical nature of their caring. I have also met one young mother who loooked the picture of health. She has a vast amount of support with her caring role, is able to exercise every day, and run marathons. I realised when I met her, that if we all were able to have reasonable time off, we could all look as serene as she does.She still has all the day to day worries about organising paperwork etc, to keep things running smoothly, but also has the luxury that most of us cannot access, and that is "me time".