Thyroid issues

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18 months ago, my son, who has Down's Syndrome and is probably also on the Autistic Spectrum, got a borderline thyroid function result at his annual screening. Since then he has become increasingly tired, withdrawn and grumpy. I must admit I was worried it was just looking like regular depression.
Three weeks ago, the learning disability consultant decided to try him on thyroxin, and the results have been very positive: improved mood and alertness, more cheerful, and up in the morning on time.
Great result!!
So, I wonder how many other apparent mental health issues - especially in those with learning disabilities - are really due to undiagnosed endocrine or other physical health disorders?
I've found a lot of very interesting info on this site
http://www.thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/
https://healthunlocked.com/thyroiduk
I went undiagnosis for two years. Every other avenue was sort. Except thyroid function until I insisted on a blood test. As of six months ago I now take 25mg Levothyroxine. Today my g.p. called to up the doze following a 10 week blood test to 50mg. Before taking the thyroxine I was always tired, falling asleep, no energy, aches and pains and fed up. Every consultant I was send to see always ask before anything else. Are you depressed? I can speak for myself what about individual as you say with learning disability. They can't also express how they feel. A thyroid function is just a blood test. Although it takes several times over several months to establish your own levels. Which are unique. I also saw a endocrinologist who disagreed with my g.p. However, my g.p. stated she sees many patients with different levels and asked me to trust her. I glad I did!
I think low thyroid (hypothyroidism)(Graves syndrome?) is one of the things that middle aged women get checked out for, but I suspect that thyroid problems are less 'anticipated' in younger people. Even when they are checked for, as SD says, each person's level is 'unique' to them, so what is normal 'in general' may NOT be normal for each person. So if hypo/hyperthyroidism is discounted by the GP because of 'normal' results' that may not be accurate.

As for endocrine problems in general with young people, a friend of mine's son in his twenties had what the doctors insisted was a viral infection, but it worsened and worsened, and finally he was rushed to hospital A&E, where, by the grace of God, they happened to have a top endocrinologist around who, taking a complete punt, said (I paraphrase) 'it should be impossible at his age, but he's showing every sign of having an Addisonian crisis'...... acute failure of the adrenal glands, which would have killed him had he not been immediately treated for it. He pulled through, but it was touch and go. He's now on daily injections (it's sort of like diabetes of the adrenal glands - he has to compensate for his body's inability to produce the required hormone), and has to be careful not to get over-stressed or he could have another crisis. It's very, very rare in someone his age (the most famous Addison patients are JFK and Jane Austen - both middle aged!)

It was, as it is so often, thanks to his mum insisting that 'something is not right' that got him to A and E and saved his life. When in doubt, trust your instincts. After all, if you're wrong, you're not worse off, but if you're right, you could save their life. Better to make a fuss unnecessarily, than not make a fuss when it was necessary.
My son, age 26, has Downs's, autism, adhd and an under active thyroid. Over a period of time he slowed right down, was tired and lethargic all the time and lost his spark. Because it happened gradually over a period of time we didn't notice how much his behaviour and moods had changed. However, one day I had a lightbulb moment and the words 'under active thyroid' popped into my head. Got him tested and bingo, a script for leventhyroxine soon had him back on the road to himself. However, a strange thing happened, probably coincidence but... Looking back, his undiagnosed (no one is interested) autism has become much more noticeable. He displays classic symptoms and his odd behaviours have increased to the point that he is extremely difficult and it it having a negative impact on all our lives. Combined with all his other problems, my rheumatoid arthritis and very little in the way of support, I don't know how we manage!
Lesley_15012 wrote:My son, age 26, has Downs's, autism, adhd and an under active thyroid. Over a period of time he slowed right down, was tired and lethargic all the time and lost his spark. Because it happened gradually over a period of time we didn't notice how much his behaviour and moods had changed. However, one day I had a lightbulb moment and the words 'under active thyroid' popped into my head. Got him tested and bingo, a script for leventhyroxine soon had him back on the road to himself. However, a strange thing happened, probably coincidence but... Looking back, his undiagnosed (no one is interested) autism has become much more noticeable. He displays classic symptoms and his odd behaviours have increased to the point that he is extremely difficult and it it having a negative impact on all our lives. Combined with all his other problems, my rheumatoid arthritis and very little in the way of support, I don't know how we manage!
I think we may be in the same ballpark, Lesley. Please also watch out for Diabetes Type1, because there may be a link: excessive thirst is the main clue.
J displays many typical Autistic-type behaviours, but these are masked by Downs Syndome to some extent, and some of them were simply amusing in childhood: now, in adulthood they are looking more serious.