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Social Care FUNDING : GREEN Or RED HERRING PAPER ? Various Schemes And Utter Madness : All Together In This Thread - Page 10 - Carers UK Forum

Social Care FUNDING : GREEN Or RED HERRING PAPER ? Various Schemes And Utter Madness : All Together In This Thread

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179 posts
Yep ... that £ 132 BILLION or so ... on a graph , and following the Green Paper , just watch how steeper it get !

( Will make a complete mockery of " Juggling work wth caring. " )

Even if CarerWatch was still functioning , I doubt if even it could change what's in store for the 2019 carer army.

You have been warned ... repeatedly !!!
Found on "Community Care Daily today. I've separated it into easier to read paragraphs!


"Care minister Caroline Dinenage has warned adult social care bosses that the long-delayed green paper will not solve all the sector’s problems as she sought to dampen expectations of the forthcoming policy document.
Speaking at this week’s Association of Directors of Adult Social Services’ (ADASS) Spring Seminar, Dinenage said the two-year delay in delivering the green paper – first promised in the March 2017 Budget as a route to a more secure and sustainable system – had raised expectations to unrealistic levels.
“I feel, today, a sense of responsibility to point out that neither the green paper, in fact, nor any government decision whether local or national will solve all the challenges that we face in adult social care.
“That is only someone we can all achieve by working together and by organisations and by communities.”

Multiple delays
The green paper was first due to be issued in summer 2017 but its expected publication date has been delayed six times since.
In January, health and social care secretary Matt Hancock told the House of Commons it would be published “by April” but it is now expected in June, according to think-tank the King’s Fund.

Dinenage said Brexit negotiations had left the Department of Health and Social Care “fighting for political oxygen” to find a window of opportunity to deliver the paper and expressed her extreme frustration at not being able to get the paper over the live.
She also sympathised with directors about the delay, telling directors that they had “every right” to be exasperated.

Focus on independent living
The green paper has been seen by the sector as needing to confront two issues: chronic underfunding of the existing means-tested care system, driven by the big cuts in government funding to councils since 2010; and the need to protect self-funding people outside the current system from catastrophic care costs.

In her speech, Dinenage gave little away on the first point but did nothing to suggest that significant new short to medium-term funding for the existing system would be forthcoming.
She said the green paper would focus on how to enable people to live more independently in their homes and be active members of their communities, promoting innovative models of care and the sharing of good practice from around the country.

On the second point, Dinenage said the green paper would raise expectations of individuals’ responsibility for their care, but stressed this would have to be matched by the state ensuring that services were “of the highest quality and the best value for money”, and that people were protected from “unexpected, exorbitant and unfair care costs”.

It is not clear whether this means the paper will suggest a taxpayer-funded cap on lifetime social care costs – which was previously government policy – or some form of insurance system, into which people and potentially their employers paid into to protect themselves from catastrophic care costs.

Such a model was proposed by a joint report by Parliament’s health and social care and housing, communities and local government select committees last year and was greeted warmly by Hancock.

Making a case for social care
Discussing the whereabouts of the green paper in her inaugural speech, new ADASS president Julie Ogley raised concerns about the current state of social care and at the document’s delay.

“If I think about the current agenda for adult social care, after a decade of austerity, and where do we find ourselves – serving fewer people, with a fragile care market, a fragile workforce with no national workforce strategy, unsustainable funding without a settlement but increasingly reliant on one-off grant funding, without a green paper providing our future strategic direction, with other partners trying to set the adult social care agenda.”

She pointed out that the NHS had already been given it’s long-term plan for the future and questioned if the government’s decision to delay the green paper was a sign that it was not prioritising the sector and that social care was “being determined through the plans of others” instead."
Thanks to BB :

Found on "Community Care Daily today. I've separated it into easier to read paragraphs!


"Care minister Caroline Dinenage has warned adult social care bosses that the long-delayed green paper will not solve all the sector’s problems as she sought to dampen expectations of the forthcoming policy document.

Speaking at this week’s Association of Directors of Adult Social Services’ (ADASS) Spring Seminar, Dinenage said the two-year delay in delivering the green paper – first promised in the March 2017 Budget as a route to a more secure and sustainable system – had raised expectations to unrealistic levels.

“I feel, today, a sense of responsibility to point out that neither the green paper, in fact, nor any government decision whether local or national will solve all the challenges that we face in adult social care.

“That is only someone we can all achieve by working together and by organisations and by communities.”

Multiple delays


The green paper was first due to be issued in summer 2017 but its expected publication date has been delayed six times since.
In January, health and social care secretary Matt Hancock told the House of Commons it would be published “by April” but it is now expected in June, according to think-tank the King’s Fund.

Dinenage said Brexit negotiations had left the Department of Health and Social Care “fighting for political oxygen” to find a window of opportunity to deliver the paper and expressed her extreme frustration at not being able to get the paper over the live.
She also sympathised with directors about the delay, telling directors that they had “every right” to be exasperated.

Focus on independent living

The green paper has been seen by the sector as needing to confront two issues: chronic underfunding of the existing means-tested care system, driven by the big cuts in government funding to councils since 2010; and the need to protect self-funding people outside the current system from catastrophic care costs.

In her speech, Dinenage gave little away on the first point but did nothing to suggest that significant new short to medium-term funding for the existing system would be forthcoming.

She said the green paper would focus on how to enable people to live more independently in their homes and be active members of their communities, promoting innovative models of care and the sharing of good practice from around the country.

On the second point, Dinenage said the green paper would raise expectations of individuals’ responsibility for their care, but stressed this would have to be matched by the state ensuring that services were “of the highest quality and the best value for money”, and that people were protected from “unexpected, exorbitant and unfair care costs”.

It is not clear whether this means the paper will suggest a taxpayer-funded cap on lifetime social care costs – which was previously government policy – or some form of insurance system, into which people and potentially their employers paid into to protect themselves from catastrophic care costs.

Such a model was proposed by a joint report by Parliament’s health and social care and housing, communities and local government select committees last year and was greeted warmly by Hancock.

Making a case for social care

Discussing the whereabouts of the green paper in her inaugural speech, new ADASS president Julie Ogley raised concerns about the current state of social care and at the document’s delay.

“If I think about the current agenda for adult social care, after a decade of austerity, and where do we find ourselves – serving fewer people, with a fragile care market, a fragile workforce with no national workforce strategy, unsustainable funding without a settlement but increasingly reliant on one-off grant funding, without a green paper providing our future strategic direction, with other partners trying to set the adult social care agenda.”

She pointed out that the NHS had already been given it’s long-term plan for the future and questioned if the government’s decision to delay the green paper was a sign that it was not prioritising the sector and that social care was “being determined through the plans of others” instead."
Thanks BB ... now added to the main GREEN PAPER / SOCIAL CARE thread.

https://www.carersuk.org/forum/support- ... 95#p404395
I have merged the 2 topics together to keep it all in one place and easier to follow

x
it makes me so annoyed that yet again there is no funding for the social services!! There are simply thousands of elderly & young people who need care.Many family s are busy leading their own lives.We are very lucky to have carers twice a day,but they are all worked off their feet.I am a carer for my Hubby. But the whole welfare system needs to be changed.Carers need to be paid more.Regards Amanda h
Now , we appear to be getting somewhere ?

( Thanks to Wendy at Chill4Us for posting the link on their site ! )

Matt Hancock : Stop OAPs selling homes to fund care.

NO ONE should have to sell their home to pay for old age care, Health Secretary Matt Hancock pledged last night.


Image


Millions live in fear they will be forced to put their property on the market to find enough cash for care home fees, which can be as much as £1,000 a week. But Mr Hancock, whose responsibilities include social care, said that those who have strived and saved all their lives should not be punished simply for growing old. His intervention came amid a growing row about how the social care crisis can be tackled.

Mr Hancock declared that the threat of losing a family home or seeing savings vanish to meet spiralling care costs was an “injustice”.

He said: “I really don’t like that, I really don’t. So I completely understand why people worry about the threat of losing their home because of something they cannot do anything about.”

His comments will be welcomed by those worried that if they need care their children will not receive an inheritance from equity built up in their homes.

The Department for Health and Social Care’s long-awaited Social Care Green Paper should provide suggestions for how to fund care, for instance, through a state-backed insurance scheme. But the Green Paper has been delayed six times.

Mr Hancock, who backs the Daily Express Respect for the Elderly Crusade, recognised the frustration the delays have caused.

He said: “It’s such an important area. The thing about social care is, to get a sustainable solution, it needs cross party agreement, a bit like when you make big changes to pensions, and getting that sort of cross-party agreement when Brexit has been so alive has been really difficult. We need to take some of that partisan politicking out of social care to try and get a long-term solution.”

Britain needs to be able to pay for a population that by 2066 will include more than 20 million people over the age of 65 and when there will be treble the number of over 85s that there are now.

Father-of-three Mr Hancock, who has been warned the crisis is “moving from urgent to critical”, has previously told a House of Lords committee “the threat to people that they might lose their home from something that they can’t do anything about and can’t insure against is one of the injustices of the system”.

Last month former deputy prime minister Damian Green, who first commissioned the Green Paper, suggested that millions of over 50s could pay more than £4,000 extra in National Insurance to access care in old age.

Current rules dictate state funding for care is not available if a person has a certain level of cash savings, or if someone has a property and moves into a care home. It means millions have to fork out for the full cost – right down to their final £23,250 – if their need for care goes on for years, as is often the case with dementia victims. The money can be taken from the value of their home, denying loved ones an inheritance.

Campaigner Mike Padgham, who runs care homes in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, said: “The cost of social care should be provided across the population through National insurance and tax, the same as the NHS.”

Caroline Abrahams, of Age UK, added: “Parting with your home or life savings in order to meet the cost of care is heartbreaking for many older people but too often there is no other choice.”



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One comment worth repeating on here ... a quite common one if any reader has perused the comments section of many
of the articles posted in this thread !


What is unfair is when people who have gone out and spent all their money all their lives and in some cases have never worked enjoy the same level of care as someone who has been forced to sell a £300,000 house to fund their care when they have done without and scrimped and saved to buy that house in the first place !
CARE CHAOS Social care shake-up delayed again after row over who will pay for new system

Matt Hancock has had to shelve plans for a new system of social care for at least five months
Sources claim a bitter funding stand-off mean the Social Care Green Paper will not now be published until the Spending Review this autumn

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/9099569/s ... ew-system/
At least it's being debated ... ?

Hopefully , not a Brexit replay !
They may as well just release it now so a real consultation can take place now among those it will affect now and prepare others for the future.

Can you remember yrs ago the idea of passing all DLA/AA to local councils? Wonder if something similar will be suggested.
As more people claim Universal Credit, which has a carers element, how long before they try say CA no longer cost effective to be administered as it is now. Mind boggles as to what to expect..... :?
179 posts