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Carers UK Forum • shower
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shower

Posted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 5:04 pm
by maria
Hi I was wondering, because my son , has problems at night, wetting the bed.
He has to wake up extra early in the mornings before school to have a bath, which uses alot of water. It also makes him tired and grumpy.
Is there anyway that anyone knows of any grants for a shower to be fitted.
My son has under gone three major heart ops..suffering a stroke in the recovery of one , which has weakened his left side, and given him learning problems.
He,s on high care dla.
Any help would be gratefully accepted, as I don,t know who to ask. thanx Maria
Image

The family fund is one

Posted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 5:11 pm
by piscesmaid
The family fund is one option, and I am sure there are others who will give you some more possibles later.

http://www.familyfund.org.uk/

I would approach social services

Posted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 5:26 pm
by Guest
I would approach social services and request an OT to carry out a bath assessment, social services can arrange for a shower to be fitted over the bath and provide a shower board to fit on the bath if your son has a problem standing to shower, if his problem with bathing is sufficiently severe they may approve and arrange for a wet room to replace the bathroom.

Hi Maria The Government currently provides

Posted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 5:33 pm
by Jimbo
Hi Maria

The Government currently provides a grant to assist clients or their carers to make essential adaptations to their homes.

If you Google, The Disabled Facility Grant, It may give you all the information you need. It does say that it will involve an assessment by an Occupational therapist.

Hope this info. is of use Image

Thankyou very much for your

Posted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 6:16 pm
by maria
Thankyou very much for your help. I shall look this up now.

Parsifal is spot on. Occupational therapy

Posted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 6:58 pm
by Scally
Parsifal is spot on.
Occupational therapy will provide it.... ask social services for an assessment.

The route Parsifal suggests is

Posted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 7:40 pm
by poppett
The route Parsifal suggests is the route we went down for a shower for dad.

Take care
Meg

The problem with going down

Posted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 8:41 pm
by Eun
The problem with going down the OT Social Work route is the time you have to wait - we had to wait 6 years for my sons shower chair despite going to councillors, MP etc. Sometimes you are better trying to apply to charities etc - of course you then run into (as we have) we will not fund items which it is the duty of social services to provide. Talk about Catch 22!!

Eun

Timing is crucial. Sometimes there

Posted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 9:08 pm
by Scally
Timing is crucial. Sometimes there is a last minute rush in February to spend the money. I used to work for a Scottish health authority as strategic planning manager and if we had a projected underspend by Christmas, (which we did more years than not) I used to transfer a few hundred thousand quid across to my local authority colleagues to help clear their backlog of adaptations. My underlying argument to the Board was that it helped us clear "blocked beds", as indeed it did. But it also helped create a climate of trust and partnership between the two, often warring, bureaucracies, and this paid off in all kinds of ways, like the local authorities diverting some of their social housing budget to helping long stay patients moving into new homes.

Funnily enough, a well-written letter to the health board chairman or general manager from an ordinary patient or carer can often help this kind of policy decision. People have no idea how powerful individual letters can be. The biggest mistake is to assume that public servants are all uncaring crooks - most of them do this job because they genuinely want to make a difference.

Footnote to the above

Posted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 9:34 pm
by Scally
By way of an aside, this reminds me of a meeting at top level between my own Health Board and a Local Authority. My boss, the young and enthusiastic Director of Public Health, announced out of the blue that we wanted to give the local authority £3M to help with their own mental health promotion community programmes, prevention being better than cure.

The Social Services manager, a time-served, diehard, typical Masonic signed up member of the awkward squad Scottish mafia, couldn't believe it. His body language showed the lessons of years of suspicion and distrust, he just assumed there was a catch somewhere. "Aye, but I'll have to ask the Members, and anyway what's in it fer us?" he blundered, whilst his younger colleagues stood back aghast by his utter stupidity in looking a genuine gift horse in the mouth. Needless to say he was offered early retirement a year after that and a much more capable woman was put in his place.