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Recognising Carers - Page 2 - Carers UK Forum

Recognising Carers

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
Volunteers needed to nail Charles to the mast..... Image Image.
OOPS,I do sincerely apologise but I misread you Charles... Image Image

Charles said
in order to be recognised as my son's support in need I have to make sure I use the "carer" label
Theres that word again Charles..Recognised.
You are so right tho.In order to access services and suchlike,we need be recognised for what we do sometimes ahead of the relationship we have with our loved one.

I look forward to reading comments from others on this thread.

Rosemary
AKA ( Anne Bonny.....pirate of the Caribbean... Image Image )
Hi
I am not a carer just an Husband.
I was there for my Mum & Dad as a Son Just did and do what any other Son or Husband would do.
They cared for me I did what they needed me to do and still doing it for my wife.
I don't what's thanks it's my privilege to do it .
John.
All of us feel love and a sense of duty to our carees, but the warm glow of virtue does nothing towards paying the bills and putting food on the table. Giving carers the same level of financial benefits as are payed to foster parents and recognising that we are actually working would make life so much easier.
Hi ann I UK>I have said exactly the same thing ann, foster parents do a great job but the sum of money i do not understand, i have heard that some council foster parents get four hundred pounds per week, well, even a hundred pounds per week for carers would be a start but carers are just left to rot, i get emails from people who can just about afford to eat after they have paid their bills, it is shocking in todays society, the government should be ashamed of itself.

Best wishes Tony.
Hi
I am not a carer just an Husband.
I was there for my Mum & Dad as a Son Just did and do what any other Son or Husband would do.
They cared for me I did what they needed me to do and still doing it for my wife.
I don't want thanks it's my privilege to do it .
John.
All of us feel love and a sense of duty to our carees, but the warm glow of virtue does nothing towards paying the bills and putting food on the table. Giving carers the same level of financial benefits as are payed to foster parents and recognising that we are actually working would make life so much easier.
Hi Ann
Just my thoughts how I feel about assisting my wife.
We also used to foster and we have Adopted also.
That was many years ago now. When we were fostering we only got a pittance or if any money some week's it was less in those day's than what the parent's of those children were getting for family allowance at the time.
I am so glad that one part of our community is getting a fair deal these day's more than we got when we did it.
Don't get me wrong we did it because we wanted to not because someone asked us to do it.
So perhaps that's where our warm glow of virtue comes from.
John
I knew It, Rosemary has spilled the beans, she is the blackhearted most feared monster of the Spanish Main, Anne Bonney reincarnated (in her dreams Image but I am sure that some hapless officials she has crossed swords with would testify that she is not joking Image
So far as Labels go, when I had to supervise untrained Care Workers who looked after my wife, I slipped into my old nursing mode and treated them just as I treated junior staff when I was a Staff Nurse in hospital. I had to adopt the same persona with my wife, as if I had let down my professional detachment I would have been completely useless for her. It was always a maxim in hospitals where I worked, 'never nurse your own relatives'. Partly I suppose to ensure equal treatment for all. There was one incident where a student nurse's father was admitted after a heart attack to the ward where she was working, and she was immediately transferred to another ward.
The only time I felt like a husband to my wife (after her personality was radically changed), was when she was in hospital for investigations etc., and I used to help the nursing staff feed her at mealtimes. And on some occasions administer medicines to her when the nursing staff had found it impossible to do so, after she became unable to swallow. They didn't know the old trick of mixing the crushed pills with jam. They don't teach that I suppose in modern nursing degree courses I suppose.
best wishes normangardner
I would never have coped with nursing mum at home without the "nurses hat" to fall back on. It was easier for me to adopt the professional attitude whilst attending to the nursing/personal needs, that way our time together chatting was precious. Latterly mum had no clue who I was and I found adopting the "nurses hat" was the only way I could cope. I was so lucky in the care manager we had (now retired) who was of the old school.....Mum panicked when being moved and the carers have new fangled ways of lifting folk now.......pure pandemonium....This wonderful woman used to call in each afternoon for a quick visit and help me lift mum up the bed the way she liked......the old lift and shift method.......She was not even six stones so we were hardly likely to hurt ourselves. Sometimes the health and safety thing goes too far and a little common sense would go a very long way.
As a family we do the "See you in the morning, God willing" as a matter of course. I try never to go to bed on an arguement as I would always want my last conversation to be one I would want remembered, not a source of worry to the person left behind.
Do not feel quilty about wanting the pain being suffered to go away for your caree....worry more about feeling as I did....if I wasn`t here then this wouldn`t be happening to me......and the guilt that comes after that.