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Carers UK Forum • POA
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POA

Posted: Sat Sep 04, 2010 7:21 pm
by TriciaA
My mother and I have been talking about Power of Attorney and that perhaps she should make one. We are both a little concerned, heaven forbid, should she ever reach the point whereby she is unable to make decisions/sign forms etc.
I am sure I read somewhere, quite a while back, that the social services/council can take control of a persons finances if there is no POA?
Tricia x

My belief is that EVERYONE

Posted: Sat Sep 04, 2010 11:17 pm
by susieq
My belief is that EVERYONE should make a POA - we don't know what may be just round the corner and it can solve a lot of problems in the future.

Mum agreed to one just before her Alzheimer's was diagnosed although we didn't need to register it until the Alzheimer's took over. It has proved a blessing as we have been able to look after her affairs more and more as the Alzheimer's has progressed.

We did Mum's through a local solicitor, but if you feel confident you can download the forms and do it yourselves. It is a lot easier to do if done whilst the donor still has full mental capacity.

You can find all the information here:

http://www.publicguardian.gov.uk/forms/ ... an-LPA.htm

Yes, I have one and

Posted: Sat Sep 04, 2010 11:28 pm
by Scally
Yes, I have one and all the adult members of my family do too, waiting to be activated in the event of a loss of capacity, which can happen to anyone, at any time. It's much more important than making a will, because you may be alive to see the consequences of your POA.

My belief is that EVERYONE

Posted: Sat Sep 04, 2010 11:32 pm
by Suki
My belief is that EVERYONE should make a POA - we don't know what may be just round the corner and it can solve a lot of problems in the future.

Mum agreed to one just before her Alzheimer's was diagnosed although we didn't need to register it until the Alzheimer's took over. It has proved a blessing as we have been able to look after her affairs more and more as the Alzheimer's has progressed.

We did Mum's through a local solicitor, but if you feel confident you can download the forms and do it yourselves. It is a lot easier to do if done whilst the donor still has full mental capacity.

You can find all the information here]http://www.publicguardian.gov.uk/forms/ ... an-LPA.htm[/url]
I have got the forms all ready and done waiting for me to figure them out, then have to send off to get them stamped.

I've seen a number of

Posted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 6:24 am
by charles47
I've seen a number of situations where people did not have power of attorney and although there are now other measures available, they are not as effective as having power of attorney and - as you say - social services or other authorities can take decisions in the "best interests" of the person lacking capacity, although they have to go through a number of legal hoops and hurdles. But any system is open to abuse and it's far better to be prepared in advance.

It cost us over £400

Posted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 7:37 am
by NanaNana
It cost us over £400 to have ours done through a solicitor. I have POA for hubby. We are in the process of getting hubby to be POA for me, BUT although hubby has all his faculties and is of sound mind and the most intelligent person I've ever met, the Office of the Public Guardian (to whom the forms have to be sent for agreement etc etc) are arguing the toss, because he is UNABLE to sign any forms.
Our solicitor came to our house to sort all the original forms out and had various witnesses with her to witness her signing on behalf of hubby. She said that was fine and originally the OPG told her it was fine, when she explained our situation.
They've changed their minds and are now not happy about it. Our solicitor is absolutely FUMING about it and is fighting their decision (and waiving our fee, by the way). She has done everything that they asked her to do, in our case and now have changed their minds. The fight continues, meanwhile I have no POA and hubby is really anxious about it and cannot understand why they are discriminating against him possibly being able to make sound decisions about my possible future care etc, just because he cannot sign a form.
Could we have the OPG under the Disability Discrimination Act, I wonder?

That sounds like disability discrimination

Posted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 8:03 am
by Guest
That sounds like disability discrimination to me too, if other organisations have found ways to accomodate individuals who are capable of decision-making but cannot sign their name due to disability why not the OPG? Have you contacted to the Equalities Commission about it? It may be that they have had other cases.

I didnt pay a penny

Posted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 3:59 pm
by Scally
I didnt pay a penny for our POA's - just used a standard template available from several charity websites and modified it very little. Then you only have to pay if and when you want to actually activate it, and that isnt very much. Lawyers earn big fees by churning out standard templates, its a racket.

Our children have POA where

Posted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 4:54 pm
by flipflap
Our children have POA where we are concerned, should it ever be needed. Now I care for my disabled husband I feel relieved they have a watching brief so I can't screw up too badly.