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People on carers Allowance - Carers UK Forum

People on carers Allowance

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
anyone got a figure for how many people are on Carers Allowance or a place where i can access that info?
Its about 700-000 / 740-000 in receipt of the carers allowance to double the allowance IIAN DUNCAN SMITH former tory leader has claimed would cost 1 billion he in his report broken britain claimed it should be increased to reward carers for the cash they save the state .


GEORGE=====


This is one thing that gets me going we have 7 million carers yet for various reasons only 740-000 on the allowance and the government always aims to help those not on the allowance just to grab headlines look at me ma ive helped 7 million people and it cost nowt.
Its about 700-000 / 740-000 in receipt of the carers allowance to double the allowance IIAN DUNCAN SMITH former tory leader has claimed would cost 1 billion he in his report broken britain claimed it should be increased to reward carers for the cash they save the state .


GEORGE=====


This is one thing that gets me going we have 7 million carers yet for various reasons only 740-000 on the allowance and the government always aims to help those not on the allowance just to grab headlines look at me ma ive helped 7 million people and it cost nowt.
we should get something back from the £87bn we save them each year.
we should get something back from the £87bn we save them each year.
I don't think we actually save the government anything. They are really just bankers. They take from us the citizens, and then they hand it back to us. After taking their cut.

And as most of us are also citizens and taxpayers, you could argue we should save ourselves the hassle of paying a lot more tax, which then gets filtered through a whole hierarchy of well-paid civil servants, and we end up having to claim it back. Its a lot of paperwork, isnt it?

I'm playing the devils advocate here of course, but I also have serious doubts about the whole idea that someone should pay me to look after my family.

I think there are two real alternatives, and both have some merit. One is to pay the disabled person a decent attendance allowance according to their degree of need, with which they then pay the carer of their choice]http://www.carersuk.org/images/icon_lol.gif[/img]
Its a total cock up from day one when most carers were unmarried daughters the government have in my opinion never come to terms with the problem of full time care within the family unit .
I could return to wotk now ( well once iam fit enough) however the old doll could not look afer herself she would probably end up in some kind of rest / care home she has very large pension but even if her pension was used towards her care the local authority / social services & N.H.S. would have to find at least £2-000 per month towards her care as you know i get £200 per month now so why not just cut out the middle man and give me the money .

Iam not sure if the disabled person should be tested as to how disabled they are for their payment allowance the old doll is 100% war disabled yet she aint at deaths door some elderly/young disabled have many complex problems re the kind of care they need as ive said before you dont have to wipe bums all day to be a carer ( had 4 years of that with STAN )
even if you just have to sit with someone 24/7 you are in my opinion working as a carer.

What about child benefit and all that goes with it ?

GEORGE==== FOOTY TIME
I'm for the citizens wage, the social wage in the absence of the citizens wage but these are so far in the future if ever and I'd like to see what we do and save the taxpayer acknowledged financially.

As we've discussed before a carers wage, call it what you will, would go into the family pot for most of us along with the disability benefits and I know that just as I subsidise my husband out of my DLA I'd equally use most of a carers wage to provide a better life for him, another day at his day centre which he wants but we can't afford, for example.

As for paying higher disability allowances to pay a carer including family members there are issues around being paid by our carees to do what we currently out of love and a sense of duty, somehow it devalues that commitment and changes the relationship from that of husband and wife, parent and child, etc. to one of employer and employee. I think this has the capacity to be destructive to the relationship and it would be something that I personally would find unacceptable, i.e. to essentially be my husband's employee rather than his wife.
SEE: http://sturly.com/jb8

Response by Laurie Hilsgen, Co-Founder, Carers NZ, to the keynote address by Jill Pitkeathly, former CEO of Carers UK]At the time in NZ there were moves to train home care workers and family carers to perform a range of invasive procedures that would normally be done by nurses. With a training budget of $30, so one draft contract proposed, a nurse could teach a paid worker or unpaid family carer to perform a health task that had significant legal and health risks for all parties.

"Where do we draw the line with these issues," I asked Jill. At that time I was myself performing health tasks for my partner that in hindsight were not appropriate for him or for me. I was grappling with the pressure of becoming a quasi-nurse, to keep my partner at home rather than enter residential care, in a rural area, at a time when people with high needs might receive a community nurse visit once a week. No one had asked whether I wanted to perform these procedures, or whether it was appropriate for me to perform them without training ... or whether I should receive training to perform them, thus finally crossing the line from lover and partner to nurse and carer. My real question to Jill, which she heard and I was not aware I had asked, was whether my relationship with my partner would be forever changed once this line had been crossed. A decade on, I can say that this metamorphosis did happen ... that it was irrevocable ... and that it is a danger I warn of to other carers and to professionals and family members with disabilities.

Jill's barked response still resonates with me, more than a decade later -- "Carers must never be taught to be nurses. Carers are not nurses. They are parents, spouses, siblings, partners, lovers, neighbours, friends. Once you start training carers to perform nursing tasks, you undermine the profession of nursing, and you are on a slippery slope whereby it becomes okay for family members to perform health tasks that should be undertaken only by professionals."[/quote]

So maybe that partly answers the question - I dont think carers should be employees of the cared for person, but I do think that families pool money anyway.

Looking forwards to a future scenario where pensioners receive carers allowance, I am worried that we may end up with a very complicated situation where increasingly, elderly couples both with major disabilities like my own parents - now in their late 80's and still living independently - are both eligible for carers allowance for looking after each other, whilst an older person living alone without a carer would not have that extra income stream.
We too are in the insane position of both being in receipt of disability benefits yet I'm expected to care for husband. He's been discharged early from hospital and I've been expected to care for him, despite the fact that I'm clearly disabled, have difficulty walking and use elbow crutches no-one has ever asked me if I could cope; we've had the intermediate care team in, 40 minutes to an hour a day and I've been expected to nurse him for the remaining 23 hours, change urine-soaked beds and remake them and roll him while I change the bed, I can't even roll over in my sleep myself; I've made treatment decisions and I've dressed leg ulcers while the GP and I have fought for the home-visiting DN team, etc., etc.; some of the stuff I've done is too intimate to mention but it hasn't been a wife's role but a nursing role. We're already there, we've been there for a long time and the capacity or the willingness of the carer to take on ever more demanding and clinical roles is already with us, I know I'm not alone.

We've just had the paramedics in to get my husband off the floor, it was my fault he fell, my damned disability combined with a piece of my equipment falling apart created a situation in which he lost his balance. And of course I couldn't help him.

Does anyone think that it's inappropriate for someone who can't do certain things for themselves to care for someone else? Like hell they do. I feel guilty that I can't care properly as no doubt your parents do but who is really guilty, us or the State for expecting people who are more than willing, are knowledgeable and intellectually capable but lack the physical capacity to do what's expected of them? I'm fiercely independent but I also know my limitations, if the State wants us to carry out roles that were previously carried out by the State then they should pay us for the work we do and enable those of us who have enormous difficulty meeting our carees' needs to use that money to pay for the assistance that the State is unwilling to provide.
Jill's barked response still resonates with me, more than a decade later -- "Carers must never be taught to be nurses. Carers are not nurses. They are parents, spouses, siblings, partners, lovers, neighbours, friends. Once you start training carers to perform nursing tasks, you undermine the profession of nursing, and you are on a slippery slope whereby it becomes okay for family members to perform health tasks that should be undertaken only by professionals."
For me one of the biggest problems is that so many of us provide high nursing care anyways whether trained or not.No one ever comes in and says......"you cant do that,you're not qualified".
Providing care at home means we do many tasks that we are not 'qualified' to do but its becomes part of a daily routine.
So making a statement that we must "never be taught" does not hold much weight with me as at times when a caring role increases we already become those 'nurses' overnight anyways.

.
I was surprised to discover that I was only entitled to one carer's allowance even though I care for two disabled people. I have created a Downing Street petition addressing this issue.

http://petitions.pm.gov.uk/caringplus/