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letting her loose on the road..... - Carers UK Forum

letting her loose on the road.....

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Hello fellow carers. Advice please. Mum, 82, not very motivated to do much outside the house, prone to depression. Likes tv and lying in bed!! Getting over hip fracture in November and doing ok round the house with a stick.
She keeps hinting that she wants to get back into her car and drive, but I'm absolutely certain that this would be lethal to both her and to the poor unsuspecting public!
Are there any laws, rules, guidelines covering the return to driving of the elderly infirm? It would help very much if I could persuade her it's not a very bright idea.
I'm taking her out a bit but she has trouble getting in and out of the car and is generally not that quick on the reaction front, although is definitely not developing any signs of dementia.
Help!!!
I dont know if this will help
https://www.gov.uk/browse/driving
Maz - I think you have answered your own question. You say "I'm absolutely certain that this would be lethal to both her and the poor unsuspecting public".

It would be really sad if your mum was injured as a result of driving when unfit to do so but if a child, or anyone at all, were to be killed, for example if she did not stop at a crossing, could you live with that?
My deal with Dad, after his knee surgery ops, was that when the GP gave him the all clear then I'd be happy for him to drive. I reminded him that it wasn't just him he had to consider, but other road users. He never asked the GP but gradually came to terms with the huge loss of independence that driving gave him. After a couple of years of a neighbour and I giving his car a run every now and then, he gave it to his granddaughter.
My brother ended up driving dad's car away so he couldn't drive any more. Dad was terminally ill with cancer and it was seriously affecting his judgement.
Sure. Lose the keys. Do it now.
I once had some hapless old biddy drive right out of a junction into my path in Bexhill On Sea: the place where time stopped still: I stopped just in time in a screech of rubber, strolled over, took the keys out of her ignition and threw them down a drain. Citizens direct action saves lives.
Hi, you would never forgive yourself if you let her drive and the inevitable happened. How about introducing her to a mobility scooter? Preferably somewhere quiet with plenty of space to start with?

Melly1
You could/should contact the DVLA outlining your concerns. They in turn have a duty to contact her GP & ask for his/her assessment, diagnosis etc.

This takes the decision out of your hands.
Our local paper (Western Telegraph)a couple of weeks ago had an article about the oldest driving Instructor in Pembrokeshire. She is 94 years old. She still has one of the best pass rates in the county for her pupils.My son's LD nurse,the nurse's parents and grandparents were all taught by the same instructor!
For myself, I don't think I would be safe by the time I reach that age(if I do reach that age!)
Hello fellow carers. Advice please. Mum, 82, not very motivated to do much outside the house, prone to depression. Likes tv and lying in bed!! Getting over hip fracture in November and doing ok round the house with a stick.
She keeps hinting that she wants to get back into her car and drive, but I'm absolutely certain that this would be lethal to both her and to the poor unsuspecting public!
Are there any laws, rules, guidelines covering the return to driving of the elderly infirm? It would help very much if I could persuade her it's not a very bright idea.
I'm taking her out a bit but she has trouble getting in and out of the car and is generally not that quick on the reaction front, although is definitely not developing any signs of dementia.
Help!!!

You won't like my reply, but she is entitled to drive. You say she "is definitely not developing any signs of dementia". Sorry, but even if she was under the Mental Capacity Act she is entitled to make her own decisions, even unwise decisions, and is entitled to support to make those decisions.

I had to come to terms with this with my own mother......legally, and I mean, your best intentions to protect your mother are obstructing her EU legal rights.