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Oral answers -elderly - health - Carers UK Forum

Oral answers -elderly - health

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
http://www.theyworkforyou.com/debates/? ... ers#g738.2

Phil Willis (Harrogate & Knaresborough, Liberal Democrat) Link to this | Hansard source

What steps he is taking to improve provision of care to the elderly.
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Ivan Lewis (Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Department of Health) Link to this | Hansard source

A number of steps are being taken to improve the provision of care to the elderly, including a three-year social care transformation programme, the first ever national dementia strategy, the new deal for carers, the extension of our dignity and care campaign, CSCI's review of social care eligibility criteria, the introduction of star ratings for care providers, the review of the adult protection framework, Lord Darzi's NHS next stage final report and public consultation that will lead to a Green Paper on the future of care and support.
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Phil Willis (Harrogate & Knaresborough, Liberal Democrat) Link to this | Hansard source

I compliment the Minister on producing a series of policy documents. The sadness is that there is a huge disconnect between the policy and its delivery. An elderly lady in North Yorkshire was discharged from hospital last week into the care of North Yorkshire social services. She was not able to make a cup of tea, to eat or to get to the toilet. Five days later, she is back in hospital with a broken wrist and dehydration. When will the Minister make two clear criteria for care of the elderly? First, nobody should be discharged from hospital unless they have 24-hour access to support. Secondly, the elderly in particular should receive rehabilitation before they are discharged into their own homes without any support at all.
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Ivan Lewis (Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Department of Health) Link to this | Hansard source

The hon. Gentleman raises a serious point. I take personal responsibility for ensuring that he is well looked after in his retirement. The serious point is that the experience of that elderly lady in North Yorkshire is entirely unacceptable. The relevant local authority and health services need to get their acts together. There is no excuse whatsoever for older people being discharged from hospital and left without appropriate care in their homes. That is why we are reviewing the eligibility criteria and why, from April, we will radically transform the way in which social care is carried out in every part of the country, including Yorkshire. We are reviewing the eligibility criteria, as they mean that far too many older people are left alone without adequate care and support. The hon. Gentleman is right. Of course, we need to ensure that national policy supports an improvement in people's experiences. Equally, we need better local leadership to take responsibility for closing the gap between health and social services.
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Brian Jenkins (Tamworth, Labour) Link to this | Hansard source

As my hon. Friend knows, most elderly people want to stop in their own homes. We want to support them. Given that we are going to have individualised budgets, does he not realise that he has to come to a decision and make it a duty on every local authority that provides social care to maintain a list of the providers of services so that elderly people have the information to make a confident decision about whom they will purchase their services from?
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Ivan Lewis (Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Department of Health) Link to this | Hansard source

I agree entirely with my hon. Friend. Older people and their families tell us time and again that they do not have high-quality, easy-to-access information that enables them to make very difficult choices about their care or the care of a vulnerable relative. That is why at the heart of the transformation of the social care programme in every local authority area will be a new approach to information, advice and, where necessary, advocacy. That need for high-quality information and advice must apply to people who fund their own care as well as those who receive public funding.
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Greg Mulholland (Leeds North West, Liberal Democrat) Link to this | Hansard source

A big issue in the care sector is the staff turnover rate, which is as high as 25 per cent. in domiciliary care, with as many as half those leaving the profession, or possibly more, doing so for good. As well as the severe implications for continuity of care, which the Government acknowledge is very important, there is a clear cost implication. Training costs £980 per person and in 2004-05 local authorities spent £20 million on advertising for vacancies and £151 million on agency staff. This is a problem: what does he intend to do about it?
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Ivan Lewis (Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Department of Health) Link to this | Hansard source

May I say to my good friend that he raises a really important issue, because we need to address the status and value of people working in social care? The work force tend to be low-paid and low-skilled, and that is one reason why the Government are investing a large amount in training. It is important that some of that money gets through to the private sector, as 75 per cent. of social care is provided by organisations in the private and voluntary sectors rather than by local authorities. Moreover, in the new care and support system that we will need in the future, it is vital that we get right the leadership, management and commissioning of the work force.

We must also have the right front-line staff. Last night, I was fortunate enough to give out awards to the heroes who, every day of the week, make a massive difference for the most vulnerable people in our society. However, we do not have enough such people, and we need to do better with our work force.
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Sally Keeble (Northampton North, Labour) Link to this | Hansard source

Is my hon. Friend aware that Northamptonshire county council is withholding the extra funds provided by the Government to pay for increased care for older people, and not passing the money on to care homes? Is that happening elsewhere? What will the Government do to ensure that the funds that they provide to pay for old people's care are not withheld by local authorities and used instead on internal bureaucracy?
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Ivan Lewis (Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Department of Health) Link to this | Hansard source

It is for local authorities to decide the level of fees that they are willing to pay to providers, but it is difficult to justify zero per cent. increases when everyone knows that, at the minimum, care providers must take account of inflation. Increasingly, we want local authorities to use their commissioning power to reward with premium rates those homes and domiciliary care agencies that offer quality and dignity, and to be much tougher on those services that achieve only the minimum standards and that do not offer the dignity and respect that older people in particular deserve.
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Good post ROSEMARY

This is the kind of thing we carers need ive said many many times re the cash we save N.H.S, first of all we look after generaly an elderly disabled relative in my case an elderly old lady 85 y.o.a. Image the main duty as a carer is just that care for your relative keep them safe from harm however if they are ill or have an accident some thing that carers try to avoid we are there 24/7 to make sure they get the hospital treatment they are entitled to, even when they are admitted to hospital we work with consultants , doctors and other health workers to make their stay in hospital as easy as possible every time i had STAN or the old doll in hospital if it were not for me they would not have even been fed most patients who have a carer at home 24/7 will normaly be discharged earlier from hospital reducing the problem of bed blocking we when at home help with physio good diet and yes other personal needs, once again how much would it cost if every old lady/gentlemen was kept in hospital or care home to give them 24/7 care untill fully recovered Image

GEORGE
I think the thing that concerned me reading the record was that the emphasis was on older patients living alone who of course need appropriate support when they return home but I think it's rarely acknowledged that patients of all ages can have carers who themselves are elderly, frail or sick or disabled and perhaps not able to give the care needed on hospital discharge without some support. I've found this a problem myself, the fact that there is someone at home, however inadequately equipped to meet the patient's needs, often leads to an early discharge to the patient's detriment.
Maybe others here could advise more about bedblocking George but as it is this article came through this morning....

http://www.hemeltoday.co.uk/tring-news/ ... 3892042.jp

For every additional day Mr Foot remained in hospital the county council faced a fine of £120 from the hospital's trust.
About four or five years ago, I can't remember exactly when, the government decided to solve the "bed-blocking" crisis in the NHS by fining social service departments for every night that a patient remained in hospital due to lack of social care provision whether that was a residential placement or domiciliary care services. For the first year social services were allocated a sum of money in their annual financial settlement to help cover the fines, I assume that this is no longer the case. In addition to hospitals trying to free up beds these fines have lead to social services also putting pressure on relatives and even patients themselves to return home or find suitable alternatives.
The whole system is crazy .

in 1999 2 years after i started as a carer STAN was in hospiatal for 2 weeks (mini stroke) we wanted him home as we thought he was ok and his stay in hospital to me was a waste of everyones time in the 3rd week consultant found out i was his full time carer he asked me how i felt about STAN going home obviously we said send him home now however the consultant insisted that we had a home visit with social services and STANS own welfare officer from the veterans agency M.O.D. when they realised i could care for him he was discharged we could not get physio so i after some very basic training helped STAN every day with his exercise .

after that whenever STAN or the old doll were in hospital which was quite often i was consulted about their discharge and was i happy to have them home i felt ok with all of this and i think their recovery was quicker at home

in STANS last year we were given hoist , bath lift , electric hospital bed mainly to stop me from being injured ramps for wheelchair and so on no way would i have ever taken STAN or the old doll home without the right equipment at home .

GEORGE- when STAN was working i remember this woman was looking at STAN everytime he walked past with some ladders it went on and on STAN then said dont worry its not my real ladder its just my step ladder.