[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/phpbb/session.php on line 585: sizeof(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/phpbb/session.php on line 641: sizeof(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable
EVICTION PROSPECT LOCAL HOUSING ALLOWANCE. - Carers UK Forum

EVICTION PROSPECT LOCAL HOUSING ALLOWANCE.

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
128 posts
Well what can l say just received note from my landlord that my rent is going down to £360 next month l am already trying to fund the £100 per month from my long term incapacity money and also mums carer and ill myself.

the council/government dont give a toss about me or mum terminally ill hanging on to life. mum has said does not want to be here fighting this fighting that in amongst mum ill health.

how am l supposed to fund the extra rent now another £50 per month this stupid local rent officer has sat behind his desk and just reduces my rent though local housing allowance.

how many people will be evicted with this rent cuts where will we live there is not social housing available only private rented accomodation.

this very nice that this coalition goverment is allowaing this to happen how must l pay this my savings over 20 years have gone and the sale of my house due to caring role mounting debts at the time. having to live on ca and insupport you cannot live on that. EVICTION IS GOING TO BE COUNTRY WIDE. kenneth2dundeenow fife.
As sad as your situation is if I was a private landlord I would put up the rent on my properties if I had to to meet the overheads. We did have a house which was rented out some years ago, and the tenants defaulted on the the rent as he lost his job. We couldn't afford to be charitable, but fortunately they did the decent thing and vacated the property before we took measures to have them evicted.
This is not about rises in rent but reductions in the LHA which pays the rent for those who do not have sufficient income to pay it themselves, both those in low-paid occupations and those out of work, some of whom are the most vulnerable in society. Perhaps society needs to consider whether having a roof over one's head is more important, a basic human right, than using property for profit, much of the rise in the cost of housing which has denied many a foothold on the property ownership ladder thus allowing landlords to charge inflated rents due to the high demand for privately rented property has been due to buy-to-let landlords leaving many more than would otherwise be the case vulnerable to changes in LHA.
This is not about rises in rent but reductions in the LHA which pays the rent for those who do not have sufficient income to pay it themselves, both those in low-paid occupations and those out of work, some of whom are the most vulnerable in society. Perhaps society needs to consider whether having a roof over one's head is more important, a basic human right, than using property for profit, much of the rise in the cost of housing which has denied many a foothold on the property ownership ladder thus allowing landlords to charge inflated rents due to the high demand for privately rented property has been due to buy-to-let landlords leaving many more than would otherwise be the case vulnerable to changes in LHA.

Maybe it would be possible for very basic accomodation to be provided for the homeless, like mobile homes, for which a fixed amount of rent would be paid countrywide.
This is not about rises in rent but reductions in the LHA which pays the rent for those who do not have sufficient income to pay it themselves, both those in low-paid occupations and those out of work, some of whom are the most vulnerable in society. Perhaps society needs to consider whether having a roof over one's head is more important, a basic human right, than using property for profit, much of the rise in the cost of housing which has denied many a foothold on the property ownership ladder thus allowing landlords to charge inflated rents due to the high demand for privately rented property has been due to buy-to-let landlords leaving many more than would otherwise be the case vulnerable to changes in LHA.

Maybe it would be possible for very basic accomodation to be provided for the homeless, like mobile homes, for which a fixed amount of rent would be paid countrywide.
Would be hard to be more basic than a lot of the expensive rented homes we had when we first married, talk about money for old rope, still the only good thing about this is maybe it will stop the gravy train of buy to let.
Vicky
This is not about rises in rent but reductions in the LHA which pays the rent for those who do not have sufficient income to pay it themselves, both those in low-paid occupations and those out of work, some of whom are the most vulnerable in society. Perhaps society needs to consider whether having a roof over one's head is more important, a basic human right, than using property for profit, much of the rise in the cost of housing which has denied many a foothold on the property ownership ladder thus allowing landlords to charge inflated rents due to the high demand for privately rented property has been due to buy-to-let landlords leaving many more than would otherwise be the case vulnerable to changes in LHA.
Maybe it would be possible for very basic accomodation to be provided for the homeless, like mobile homes, for which a fixed amount of rent would be paid countrywide.
How about giving the homeless some cardboard and sheets of corrugated iron and they can build favelas outside every town and city? Oh no, that would not do, they might ruin it for the local home-owners. I really do not want to live in a society where in order to maintain the wealth of the better off and the class status quo so that the better off can feel superior to the poor it is acceptable to firstly remove the financial aid which ensured that the poorest had decent accommodation and security of tenure and then house them in mobile home ghettos with only the most basic accommodation and amenities, the more divided a society becomes the more dysfunctional it becomes.
When I was first married in 1969, we just about managed to buy our own home. I had £4 a week housekeeping on which I had to manage and did, even though it wasn't easy even in those days. My husband worked his socks off for his family until he retired in 2003. Sadly he only had three years in which to enjoy it before becoming disabled. Apart from child benefit (and not for the first child in my day) we didn't expect handouts as many do today! I can't say my heart bleeds for the shiftless as many are these days!
When I was first married in 1969, we just about managed to buy our own home. I had £4 a week housekeeping on which I had to manage and did, even though it wasn't easy even in those days. My husband worked his socks off for his family until he retired in 2003. Sadly he only had three years in which to enjoy it before becoming disabled. Apart from child benefit (and not for the first child in my day) we didn't expect handouts as many do today! I can't say my heart bleeds for the shiftless as many are these days!
So who decides who is deserving and who is not, who is "shiftless" and who is not? We can all read the tabloids with a sense of our own superiority and buy their line that the majority of claimants are lazy scroungers who choose to claim benefits rather than work based on the worst-case scenario families they portray, the truth is rather more complex and few actually choose to live on the meagre benefits available rather than enjoy a decent standard of living earned through their own labour.

The majority of people who live on benefits do so through necessity not choice, they may have lost their jobs or been unable to get jobs when they left education, this applies to graduates as well as those less well educated, even before the recession industries were closing or moved abroad where labour is cheaper, the majority of single parents are not single women who, as some describe it, breed in order to claim social housing and benefits but the result of relationship breakdown, others may have become sick or disabled or they may have had to give up work in order to care.

As for "handouts", including assistance with housing costs, anyone who has paid into a national insurance scheme has every right to claim via that scheme when the need arises, I do not call benefits "handouts", for the majority of claimants they are their entitlement.
My sister became a single parent, when she left her violent husband.She was unable to work for several years,but when her son started school, was able to do some voluntary work in a charity shop, and progressed to part time work as a dinner lady at her son's school. When he went to secondary school,my sister did a back to work course, and got a fulltime job almost immediately.
She is still there eight years later.
I am proud of my sister. She struggled for a long time in a very tough situation.She was fortunate to get good support from the jobcentre, when she needed it, and that is important, that support is there for people, and that it is good.
I think we do have a very perverse tendency to build very expensive social housing for larger family units and totally ignore the housing needs of single homeless people and childless couples on low incomes. It must surely be possible to build a secure, basic but warm home of say 250 sq ft for less than £20,000 with a bit of imagination and the use of mass production methods. Not a mobile home (though caravan dwelling suits some folk) more of a portacabin component that can be assembled like lego bricks.
Either in a block of self-contained studio flats, with a simple bed-sitting room, a kitchenette, and a shower - that would provide the basics needs for accommodation and security - and actually this type of flatlet suits most students and holiday-makers very well, albeit it would get a bit claustrophobic after a year or two. But needs must, and it is surely preferable to sleeping rough - and in any case providing a step-up to better accommodation. We have a road of very attractive post-war "pre-fabs" in my town that are still very desirable, fifty years on. You cant get a mortgage on them, but the owners love them and they sell like hot cakes to people downsizing because they are so affordable. http://www.kvps.co.uk/cke/propertylisti ... pOfListing
A two-bedroom bungalow for £72k in a pleasant established area - you cant beat that!
128 posts