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Childcare : A Vital Clog For Anyone Juggling Work With Caring : Trouble Is , Where Is It And How Much ? Sector News - Carers UK Forum

Childcare : A Vital Clog For Anyone Juggling Work With Caring : Trouble Is , Where Is It And How Much ? Sector News

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
Existing thread ... SMOKE AND MIRRORS ... has a few articles on the problems with the Government's scheme ...
worth surfing over there for more background :

https://www.carersuk.org/forum/news-and ... %20mirrors

Also , CUK's own initiated thread is relevant here ... childcare being citied as an important factor :

https://www.carersuk.org/forum/news-and ... h%20caring


Childcare is also running into problems ... several locals are finding the costs too high in relation to their wages.

In addition , the smaller nurseries are shutting up shop in the poorer areas ... case of being squeezed both ends
... in costs , and the income coming in.

( Same problem in reverse ... adult daycare centres ... find one open and affordable ! ... elderly caree with a son /
daughter as the carer ... as I was in my time ! )



Childcare problems cost families millions new research claims.

Problems finding childcare is costing families £1.2 billion each year in lost earnings, according to new analysis from Save the Children.

The charity estimates that 89,000 mothers of children under five are unable to work because of childcare issues. It says that this represents a total of £3.4 million each day in lost earnings, or between £3,400 and £11,400 per family.



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Good, affordable nursery care benefits us all – but it’s nowhere to be found.

Private nurseries are a boon for entrepreneurs, but – for all the sanctification of motherhood – women who are exhausting themselves to work are the people we actually care about least


My daughter has been looking at nurseries. I must admit it is a long time since I had to think about that kind of thing. What I have learned is that babies are more expensive than ever. Turns out you can no longer just put them in a drawer, and they have to be wheeled around in contraptions that cost more than an old banger. But childcare – well, childcare is impossible. The old feminist demand for free creches went the way of the habit some women used to have of demanding men pee sitting down.

Private nurseries have sprung up everywhere. The babies will be fed gourmet mush and entertained non-stop while their parents work every hour they can to pay for this.

Coram Family and Childcare’s latest survey estimates that the average price for full-time nursery care for a child under two in inner London – 50 hours a week – is £330. But fewer than two thirds of councils report having anything approaching this provision. The government is meant to provide some free childcare for certain families when kids turn three, for 38 weeks of the year – you know, to help those people who only work 38 weeks a year!

All of this is a boon for private entrepreneurs who are setting up childcare businesses and paying nursery nurses a minimum wage. Many women are exhausting themselves to work, with very little of their salary left over. I relied on childminders, friends, grants and a free nursery place. I now know that was another era altogether.

Good nursery care is good for mothers and good for small children. Therefore, it is good for all of us. Sometimes its seems that, despite all the sanctification of motherhood that goes on, they are the people we care least about. Oh, and I haven’t mentioned fathers. Because, as we know, there are absolutely no issues to be solved there …

• Suzanne Moore is a Guardian columnist.



INTERLOCKING ... that dreaded word again ... zero hour contracts ?

https://www.carersuk.org/forum/support- ... 0contracts

Friends of one of my immediate neighbours ... husband / wife / son , aged 5.

Both want to work ... only option is zero hour contracts ... both were recently called in at 4 hours notice ... night shift
... six nights a week ... 8 hours shifts ... 8 weeks worth ... and , for once , the money was reasonable ... £ 9.25 per hour.

Only one problem ?

No one ... at such short notice ... to care for their son.

Dare they mention that on their UC journal ????

( One took the offer on ... the other had to refuse it. )

Childcare might become " Available only in rich areas. "

Childcare in England risks becoming the preserve of the wealthy, unless a £660m funding gap in a free childcare scheme is plugged, MPs are warning.


Severe financial strain has been placed on private and independent nurseries offering the government's flagship free 30-hours scheme, they report.

And those operating in poor areas are more likely to be threatened with closure, they say.

The government said low income families received help with childcare costs.
The national scheme offers parents of all three and four-year-olds 30 hours of free childcare a week - up from 15 hours in 2017.

But early years providers have long said the level at which these hours are funded by a government grant has meant operators have had to find other ways of making up the difference.

The All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Childcare and Early Education heard evidence of a potential reduction in nursery places in deprived areas, while in affluent areas an increase in places looks likely.

This was highlighted by Nicole Politis, director of the Portico Nursery Group, who told the parliamentary inquiry that she had a number of nurseries in different socio-economic areas.

'Closures'

She said: "Three years ago, nurseries in these deprived areas were completely full.

"Now, those in affluent areas are full, and in deprived areas the numbers of children attending are so low that I'm having to close them.

"Sadly, some parents cannot afford the additional fees, and this is being exacerbated by the roll-out of Universal Credit.

"In the end, this means that the [30-hours] scheme is not always reaching the most vulnerable families."

The APPG report said: "Should this trend continue, we risk facing a situation where only wealthy families are able to access childcare services, leading to significant reductions in educational opportunities for children, as well as more challenges to parents looking to go back into work."


'Battling'

According to the National Day Nurseries Association, the rate at which early years providers are closing has increased by 66% since the introduction of the scheme, and they are closing fastest in more deprived areas.

Tulip Siddiq MP, chairwoman of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Childcare and Early Education, said: "We know that the early years are hugely important to a child's physical and mental development and future life chances.

"However, there is a significant body of evidence to demonstrate that childcare providers are battling to achieve and maintain financial sustainability, and that government policies are a major cause of this challenge."

Children and Families Minister Nadham Zahawi said there had been a huge increase in the number of children benefitting from 30 hours free childcare.

He added that this meant parents were spending less on childcare and could work more flexibly.



Working and caring ... claiming Carers Allowance ... and with young children ?

Even when you manage to juggle all the balls , you will still be working for " Poverty pay. "

Rough guide ... £ 15k per annum per person ... at best £ 9.5k per annum ... NOT EVEN two thirds of the way there !

" Working is the way out of poverty. "

NOT FOR CARERS IT AIN'T !!!
Over 500 nurseries and childminders are closing every month, figures show.



In the past year, a total of 6,843 providers left Ofsted’s early years register, with nursery bosses warning of a looming “childcare crisis”.

Neil Leitch, chief executive of the Early Years Alliance, said that the “nail in the coffin” for nurseries has been the Government’s flagship childcare policy. Under the policy, working parents who earn up to £100,000 each are entitled to 30 hours of free childcare for three to four-year-olds, which is double the 15 hours they were previously entitled to.

The multi-billion pound taxpayer funded scheme, which came into force in September 2017, was aimed at encouraging parents to get back into work rather than getting put off by prohibitive childcare costs.

But Mr Leitch said that the policy is bankrupting nurseries because the hourly rate they are paid by the Government is far below their true cost, while other costs have increased.

“Business rates and the national minimum wage have increased,” he said. “If you have a hike in the minimum wage, it does impact us because a huge amount of our workforce is on minimum wage, it has a disproportionate effect on a sector that is really low paid. If the Government doesn’t change what it pays you someone has to pick up the tab.”

The Early Years Alliance said unless steps are taken to ensure the sector is adequately funded, there will be a “genuine childcare crisis on our hands”.

Ofsted said that providers have their registration automatically cancelled if they have not paid their fees, so some will be reinstated to the register once they have paid.

They added that the data does not take into account childminders who come off the register and then come back on again at a later date.

A report published last year suggested that free childcare has helped push up nursery costs for families to more than £6,300 a year.

The study by the Family and Childcare Trust found that sending a child in Britain aged under two to nursery part-time, for 25 hours a week, now costs £122 - up 7 per cent on last year.

Special needs child? Need childcare? Forget it!
Chris From The Gulag wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 12:16 pm
Over 500 nurseries and childminders are closing every month, figures show.



In the past year, a total of 6,843 providers left Ofsted’s early years register, with nursery bosses warning of a looming “childcare crisis”.

Neil Leitch, chief executive of the Early Years Alliance, said that the “nail in the coffin” for nurseries has been the Government’s flagship childcare policy. Under the policy, working parents who earn up to £100,000 each are entitled to 30 hours of free childcare for three to four-year-olds, which is double the 15 hours they were previously entitled to.

The multi-billion pound taxpayer funded scheme, which came into force in September 2017, was aimed at encouraging parents to get back into work rather than getting put off by prohibitive childcare costs.

But Mr Leitch said that the policy is bankrupting nurseries because the hourly rate they are paid by the Government is far below their true cost, while other costs have increased.

“Business rates and the national minimum wage have increased,” he said. “If you have a hike in the minimum wage, it does impact us because a huge amount of our workforce is on minimum wage, it has a disproportionate effect on a sector that is really low paid. If the Government doesn’t change what it pays you someone has to pick up the tab.”

The Early Years Alliance said unless steps are taken to ensure the sector is adequately funded, there will be a “genuine childcare crisis on our hands”.

Ofsted said that providers have their registration automatically cancelled if they have not paid their fees, so some will be reinstated to the register once they have paid.

They added that the data does not take into account childminders who come off the register and then come back on again at a later date.

A report published last year suggested that free childcare has helped push up nursery costs for families to more than £6,300 a year.

The study by the Family and Childcare Trust found that sending a child in Britain aged under two to nursery part-time, for 25 hours a week, now costs £122 - up 7 per cent on last year.

Wow!
This explains why I had so many issues finding a suitable childcare provider. I spent a lot of time when I was not doing anything else, just looking online on childcare websites. It took months. After a year of searching, I successfully hired a decent childcare provider who did not freak out when I asked if she was comfortable with catheters and bowel and bladder issues. It is definitely hard, isn't it? But it can be done is what I'm saying. All you need is persistence or a willingness to adapt and pool resources when you hit a wall whilst searching.
First really noticeable in poorer areas ... now spreading up the food chain.

Major problem here in Worksop ... zero hours contracts ... phone call comes in ... no one to look after the kids / caree.

Even then , the costs involved ... 2 hours work to pay for 1 hour child minding / nursery placement ... the latter even more difficult as half have closed their doors over the past year.

If on night work , forget it !
Chris From The Gulag wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 8:10 pm
First really noticeable in poorer areas ... now spreading up the food chain.

Major problem here in Worksop ... zero hours contracts ... phone call comes in ... no one to look after the kids / caree.

Even then , the costs involved ... 2 hours work to pay for 1 hour child minding / nursery placement ... the latter even more difficult as half have closed their doors over the past year.

If on night work , forget it !
Good point. For many special needs families getting childcare is a issue. It was actually much easier for me. I could have chosen a nursery for him but what I really wanted was a private childcare provider instead.
I made formal complaints to Social Services about the lack of any respite, and was then punished when some became available, M's name was taken off the list!!!
It was only available because I formed and ran a charity for all children with special needs in my area!
bowlingbun wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 9:58 pm
I made formal complaints to Social Services about the lack of any respite, and was then punished when some became available, M's name was taken off the list!!!
It was only available because I formed and ran a charity for all children with special needs in my area!
Wow that is unfair!
One in four childcare providers could close as 30 hours free funding falls short.

" The high cost of childcare pushes women out of work as in many cases it is equal to or more than their income. Women out of work means they are not represented," says campaigner.




One in four childcare providers expect to close next year due to insufficient funding to subsidise the government’s flagship 30 hours’ free childcare offer, new research has found.

The study, conducted by campaign group Pregnant Then Screwed, found 92 per cent of childcare providers are undergoing financial difficulties due to the scheme.

Some 96 per cent of the 266 childcare providers polled for the research say the government subsidy to run the 30 hours’ “free” childcare programme does not cover costs.

The study comes after the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) found the UK has one of the most expensive childcare systems in the world.

The latest research into childcare providers also found that 71 per cent say they have struggled to recruit new staff, while 90 per cent think childcare workers are poorly paid.

Joeli Brearley, founder of Pregnant Then Screwed, said: “Our research demonstrates that the government’s approach to childcare just is not working. The offer of 30 free hours sounds good on paper but, in reality, it is manifestly inadequate for the scope required.

“As it stands mothers get a year of maternity leave, with only nine months paid. So, there are two years when they either have to stay at home or bear the brunt of the high cost of childcare. With the government imposing 30 “free” hours on childcare providers from three years onwards – for just 38 weeks of the year – these providers are recouping costs from younger years.

“This necessary action to stay in business is the key reason behind mothers being unable to return to work because of the high costs, further adding to the motherhood penalty and gender pay gap.”

Ms Brearley argued the government needs to create childcare infrastructure that “works for everyone” – ensuring that nurseries do not shut their doors but maintain a high standard of care so parents can simply set off for work without suffering the “burden of high-cost childcare”.

The research found 63 per cent of childcare providers think childcare workers are overworked – with 69 per cent arguing the dearth of skilled workers has had a detrimental effect on them.

Aceil Haddad, head of press at the campaign group, said: “The deficit in funding for the government’s 30-hours scheme means that earlier care is more expensive, or there are add-on costs for parents, eg, paying for lunchtime care, paying for every minute they are late after pick-up.

“The high cost of childcare pushes women out of work as, in many cases, it is equal to or more than their income. Women out of work means they are not represented and assumptions are made about the role of women in work – ‘don’t hire her, she will leave when she has kids’ attitude.”

Last month, research by the organisation found almost a fifth of parents have been forced into quitting their jobs due to the extortionate cost of childcare in the UK.


The study found the high price of childcare causes financial anxiety in 84 per cent of households. Some 62 per cent said they have been pushed into working fewer hours due to the cost of childcare.