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Carers rights in employment. - Page 2 - Carers UK Forum

Carers rights in employment.

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
My husband is having problems at work. Our son was having a huge meltdown at home and I rang him in a panic while he was at work, worried about both mine and my sons safety. He works for a large private school in the maintenance department. He left immediately and drove home to help. He has now had a written warning and during a meeting was told 'we all have problems a home but we shouldnt bring them to work with us'
I am furious but my husband just wants to leave it. Is there a leaflet or something we can send to the personnel department just to remind them he has rights?
daisy,why is it always people that you think would understand that you have problems with your case a place that deals with children,i had a similiar problem when the girls were at college doing health and social care and found out mum had got alzheimers,they couldn't understand why they needed time off to get there heads round it all and complained about attitude and focus towards the course,i sorted the teachers out and explained that i'd of expected more from people with a nursing background.i would print a copy of the carers rights at work act out and give to the idiot who sent the warning to you
In bigger businesses,where there up to speed want to be seen having a good image etc,yes,maybe,carers get a good deal from employers.But small to medium businesses and that instinct you get,that sense of how approachable the boss is,which,at the end of the day,IS the real issue,in my view,for ME,as a carer,if I wanted to discuss how the firm might help my needs,Legislation is fine,just dandy,but if you get that gut feeling your making waves at work,raising carer issues,well,maybe you keep shtum.
My husband is having problems at work. Our son was having a huge meltdown at home and I rang him in a panic while he was at work, worried about both mine and my sons safety. He works for a large private school in the maintenance department. He left immediately and drove home to help. He has now had a written warning and during a meeting was told 'we all have problems a home but we shouldnt bring them to work with us'
I am furious but my husband just wants to leave it. Is there a leaflet or something we can send to the personnel department just to remind them he has rights?
Don't know if there's a leaflet,Daisy, but here is a CUK link on the subject]http://www.carersuk.org/help-and-advice ... ts-at-work[/url]

I'm pretty certain that the written warning could be seen as a step towards unfair dismissal.

ACAS have this page]http://www.acas.org.uk/index.aspx?articleid=3235[/url]

A call to their helpline - 08454 474747 - will make sure that if there is any literature on the subject you can get a copy. Mind you, I'd suggest taking a printout of these links to work along with the ACAS phone number and suggesting that the company takes legal advice on whether the warning should be revoked.
Thank you for the information, its just what we need!
You're welcome Image
A written warning will expire after a year or so: he received it presumably because he left his post without formally notifying his employer or requesting permission: its hard to see what else an employer could do in that situation. So no, its not unfair, nor is it a step towards anything as long as he doesnt repeat the mistake.

I changed my career to find part time employment that suited my caring responsibilities four years ago: I'm an employee but I work from home carrying out household interviews and research exactly when I want to on a fee and expenses contract with no job security at all. Its an "assignment " type contract - I get paid by results, similar to an actor, salesman or model. Not self-employed (I pay PAYE and NI) but as near as dammit. We have been working on a cohort study recently following the progress of children as they develop - its fascinating stuff, and I can be interviewing refugees in Glasgow tower blocks one day and businessman in a fancy £1M mansion the next. One recent interview I conducted with a guy who had just been released from prison, he was destitute and near-suicidal. There are some mean streets to tread, but the money can be very good: on a really good day I can earn as much as a shop assistant earns in a week. Mainly I work weekends and evenings: when my wife can provide me with back up (she works full time 9-5)
I did 5,000 miles on business last year: that pays for my car loan and running costs as well as mileage. So there may be no job security, but there are huge advantages in living by your wits if you can cope without a steady income and are a self-starter.
A few years ago when I was doing some research, I contacted ACAS for some information and advice. They were absolutely brilliant. Also, have a look at the house contents insurance, yes, I know this sounds nuts, but if you have "Legal Expenses Insurance" then ring up the company and explain what has happened, there's a good chance they might be able to help. My husband died 6 weeks after he started seeing a doctor for problems, they never realised he'd had one heart attack and was about to have a fatal one - they diagnosed arthritis. The Prudential paid all the legal costs investigating the circumstances of his death, about £10,000 in total.
Scally, I disagree: if the employer is already aware of the situation they should understand that an emergency is an emergency and has to be dealt with first. Anything else is unreasonable.

You don't ask for permission to stop and give someone CPR, do you?
In 1993 I injured myself at work, a colleague phoned my Husband at work and he came home right away.
My Husband then had our Son to care for and myself. He took a couple of odd days off work whilst trying to arrange help, explaining our circumstances to his boss . The next time he arrived at work his boss made a cocky remark to my Husband, " is the illness at home catching." His employers were ignorant of Carers and their needs.
My Husband turned up for work at the end of the week and he was given his cards and a train ticket home, with an explanation that he was the last in first out and they no longer had enough work for him!
I can only tell you that this made our lives extremely difficult.
I only hope that people who treat others with indifference under the circumstances are never in the position we found ourselves in.
If Carers rights at work were explained brief and to the point for employees and Carers, maybe these problems would not present themselves and Carers would be treated with far more respect.
Regards