[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/phpbb/session.php on line 585: sizeof(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/phpbb/session.php on line 641: sizeof(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable
Carers I interview - Page 2 - Carers UK Forum

Carers I interview

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
112 posts
how can some rather "rich " people get financial help....when her husband enters social care will she sell her rather nice home for his care ... or will she have the cash to hand ...
You have to remember that Excalibur lives and works in Scotland - the rules are different up there.
Hi Charles

There are different rules in Scotland. I have been caring in Scotland for the last 17 years. I am definitely not over burdened with money. Nor was any help foisted upon me or my caree until we both became ill and I made it crystal clear that I could not go on like that. It is not a great deal better even though I have paid carers coming in at certain times. I have not had a day off since August 2006. I am struggling to get 4 days away this year. I have funding to help with the cost.

Carers in Scotland are not dripping diamonds wherever we go. It may look good but we still get the same £53 as all the rest of you.

I think perhaps the daughter in Excalibur's story is doing an awful lot or perhaps it was just a story.

Little Lamb
Although the rules are different in Scotland there is also the point that different councils interpret the different rules differently... Image ...I think.

There are still going to be funding issues for some people, and carers are fairly low down the priority listing...
It really boils down to where you live and what your personal circumstances are. I know a lady who carried on teaching at the local school when her husband became frail and bedridden. She had LA care workers in to tend to him and neighbours to pop in if necessary. They weren't millionaires by any means- she had always been the main breadwinner. Local Authorities should support working carers- in the long term it is good for the economy. People earning are people spending. If working keeps some carers happy and healthy then it will mean saving for the NHS. I don't think Scally's lady is a Supercarer at all. She has got the resources to manage her caring situation herself. Super carers are people who juggle work, kids and more than one caree and who don't have a big fat salary.
I agree dragonlady.
I remember a teacher when I was in secondary school,her husband had MS.He could be left alone, but could do no personal care for himself. She only lived 5 minutes drive from school. She would go home at breaktime,(11am)to make him a cuppa,and was then back by 11.20 to start the next class. She went home at lunchtime to make and give him dinner,and presumably have something herself, and then came back for afternoon school.She did this every school day. They had no children.She was an excellent teacher,but always looked exhausted. It is only with hindsight that I appreciate just how hard she worked, although my mother used to comment that she would not like the teacher's life.(my mother was a Carer for my Nan, but that was alongside her two sisters and three willing teenage grand-daughters,and my parents had no financial worries).
Although the rules are different in Scotland there is also the point that different councils interpret the different rules differently... Image ...I think.

There are still going to be funding issues for some people, and carers are fairly low down the priority listing...
I honestly do not think that carers are on any list, let alone a priority list!!!!
I have asked many times re direct payments / individual budgets and have gone through the MEANS TESTED financal assessment, and have been informed time after time my / our earnings are to high for extra financial support ,,,my income at the time was just over £9-000 per year incl the carers allowance ... it has since doubled thanks to another private pension ... how can some rather "rich " people get financial help....when her husband enters social care will she sell her rather nice home for his care ... or will she have the cash to hand ...
Thats her second home actually, George! Some people do seem to land with the butter side up, dont they? But then, some people also make their own luck happen ... it's just a knack, like growing big leeks or playing the clarinet. To be fair, she is paying a lot of tax too, and we need people to pay tax to support those who can't, or won't, go out to work.
[ To be fair, she is paying a lot of tax too, and we need people to pay tax to support those who can't, or won't, go out to work].quote, Excalibur.
That is only income tax. We all pay taxes.
if i was in her situation i would have sold the second home and cared full time for the person i love ......i also pay tax a wee bit more now,, also i would not call this woman a carer at all , she has social service support, and also pays for private care , and the help of a relative ,, how much care does she actually provide ???? i wonder if she will retire aged 65 .. or will she take advantage of Camerons big society and continue to work till she drops , god knows how she will manage with her husband if she did retire look at the extra work she will have to undertake...
if i was in her situation i would have sold the second home and cared full time for the person i love ......i also pay tax a wee bit more now,, also i would not call this woman a carer at all , she has social service support, and also pays for private care , and the help of a relative ,, how much care does she actually provide ????..
Well according to George's reckoning then I can't be a carer either as I have social services support and can afford to pay a private carer. Pardon me for wanting a life and pardon me for ensuring that my caree gets one. I didn't realise to be a carer meant we all had to beat ourselves with sticks! The lady is entitled to direct payments as personal care is FREE in Scotland so if her hubby is assessed as needing 15 hours personal care then payments will be made for her to purchase it if she doesn't want social services to provide it directly. Being a carer doesn't mean slavish devotion to a loved one- it means accepting responibility to ensure that person gets the most out of life and is supported and protected. My caree gets 8 weeks short breaks a year and I go off to our second home where I can be a mum and gran and wife and just me. Landing "butter side up" isn't luck- it's down to hard work and commitment and making the most of the opportunities we have.
112 posts