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Carers I interview - Page 8 - Carers UK Forum

Carers I interview

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
112 posts
The point for me is that most of us don't have a choice about combining working and caring. For those who have a choice, they're the luckier ones and there's really no more to be said about it.

Signed,

Grumpy in Surrey
I think that it is probably true of the members of this board that majority are not working and caring, but the 2001 Census paints a different picture]2.5 million people in England and Wales combine unpaid
caring for a partner, relative or friend who is ill, frail or has a disability
with paid work. 1.5 million carers work full-time, and of those,
140,000 care for 50+ hours per week.[/quote]


This figure represented over 50% of the 3.9 million working-age carers in England and Wales, whether the 2011 Census will show a very different picture remains to be seen.

None of this alters the fact that neither working nor non-working carers are superior, all are carers and all order their lives in ways which are feasible and best meet the needs of the people who they care for, but it does correct the myth that carers who combine work and care are in the minority.

http://www.carersuk.org/professionals/r ... wnload/154
Its about making informed choices, isnt it, but also about values.
As an example of an informed choice: somebody may choose to quit their work to be a carer, despite knowing there are a range of other options available.
As an example of a value: somebody might choose to care because they genuinely believe that they are the only person who can do the job for someone they love.
Now, I dont, and have never had, any issues with that.
I do believe, with Charles, that many carers are woefully ill-informed at the start of their journey, and they need to have early access to a wide range of different examples of the kind of ways that carers adapt to circumstances (which was the point of the thread).
I also support peoples right to have values and principles.
But what does worry me is any assumption going unchallenged that one caring solution is "better" than another, especially when it is backed up by scare stories about appalling high costs of buying in care (mostly false) or of the terrible quality of paid care (again, in my experience, mostly false). I guess we parent carers have to come to terms very early with the idea of sharing care, as we use nursery places and trust our precious child to the care of their school from age 5. It certainly is a wrench, but the great thing we learn is that usually, nothing bad happens. And if that is the case for young kids, then it is also the case for adults and older people.
Excalibur said]I don't hold up this lady as a model because I want to belittle carers who lack her resourcefullness and skills, I hold her up because I think some of us can learn a little from her.
There you go Vicky and Grumpy in Surrey ( Image ) Excalibur is just pointing out that some of us 24/7 carers lack resourcefullness and skills. He wants us to learn from this lady (and from him of course). Then we too could live in lovely tastefully furnished period homes. He's trying to help us ..he's all heart lol.

And not in the least bit patronising! Image[/quote]

Thanks for picking that bit out Belle, knew I wasn't being paranoid but I would suggest we don't belittle this lady for lacking the resourcefullness and skills of the full time home carer.
Vicky Image
I give up, I really do.
the resourcefullness and skills of the full time home carer.
That's it, I think I'll just head off ski-ing in the Dollies with my caree .... and anyone left standing can spend your time discussing 101 ways of cooking cabbage stalks... Image Image My goal isnt to accept poverty, it is to challenge it at every opportunity!
Perhaps some of us have enough challenges in our life to walk over and thru and get on with. I make no judgements on those that can and are able to work I just wish I could, and before anyone says I can, no I cannot. The cost of someone looking after my husband is enormous and I would have to work full time to cover it. Yes, its not cheap. As for letting our children go to nursery school and nothing bad happens, I regret to say, sometimes it DOES!!! My husband almost died. Thats the care they gave him and the respite they game me. A one off? nope, I have a further case, which you can see on the board now going to PAL.

None of us signed up for being a carer, we have to walk our own path and find our own way, sometimes this takes many years and remember, not all of us are good at speaking out, some people can be overwhelmed with things and the so called higher pledged people who 'know best' Not everyone has experience on how to handle things, and that is where some of you/me come in, we can share our experiences and knowledge [in a humble helpful way] without putting anyone down, sometimes that is hard to read on the boards in written word, but this is a discussion right? but I too found statements and comments in the original post alarming and put downs to those that are staying at home [for whatever reason]

Its simular to.......should mothers work and leave their children in the care of a Nursery nurse? now thats a question and half that would have insight to several fors and againsts. Same to with this thread
I give up, I really do.
the resourcefullness and skills of the full time home carer.
That's it, I think I'll just head off ski-ing in the Dollies with my caree .... and anyone left standing can spend your time discussing 101 ways of cooking cabbage stalks... Image Image My goal isnt to accept poverty, it is to challenge it at every opportunity!
Why? Don't you think being a full time carer requires resourcefullness and skills?
Enjoy the ski-ing, more beach and a good book girl myself especially 101 ways of cooking cabbage stalks, just couldn't put that one down, do you know if there is another one in the pipe line?
Vicky
Enjoy the ski-ing, more beach and a good book girl myself especially 101 ways of cooking cabbage stalks, just couldn't put that one down, do you know if there is another one in the pipe line?
Vicky
Yeah, it's a classic, but somebody already wrote it]http://www.carersuk.org/images/icon_cry.gif[/img]

Image
Right to reply:
Sorry Parsifal,
I have to dispute your claim with regard to the cost of care:
...You say that care is rubbish, this is not the case, there is poor care and there is good care; you say that respite care costs around £1,000 upwards pw, this too is not the case. You can find perfectly good or even excellent care, including respite care for around half the cost which you quote, in the area where you live
From what authority do you draw your findings?

It is common knowledge that older people are subjected to mean-testing and if they have over £23,000 ( own a property) then they are charged the going rate for care which is anything from £12.50 to £18.00 an hour dependant on level of care . I can only quote figures based on 2008 findings, (at this moment in time) but I can reassure you that from my own personal experience a figure of £1,000 is fact for those who have to engage a private care company under the continuing care assessment, if their local authority cannot provide the service needed.
My mother in law is in a care home, costing around £500 a week. It's not the cheapest in the area - nor is it the most expensive. Respite beds in the same place are charged at the same rate.
Right to reply] ...You say that care is rubbish, this is not the case, there is poor care and there is good care; you say that respite care costs around £1,000 upwards pw, this too is not the case. You can find perfectly good or even excellent care, including respite care for around half the cost which you quote, in the area where you live
From what authority do you draw your findings?

It is common knowledge that older people are subjected to mean-testing and if they have over £23,000 ( own a property) then they are charged the going rate for care which is anything from £12.50 to £18.00 an hour dependant on level of care . I can only quote figures based on 2008 findings, (at this moment in time) but I can reassure you that from my own personal experience a figure of £1,000 is fact for those who have to engage a private care company under the continuing care assessment, if their local authority cannot provide the service needed.[/quote]

From personal experience also, entity. We have very recently paid £456 pw for extremely good respite care in a small, slightly shabby but incredibly good care home where the food is plentiful and good and the care is exemplary, my husband loves it and returns for short respite breaks which are now subsidised. We also have, over the years, paid for care ourselves, the costs have ranged from £13 per hour to £16 per hour increasing at weekends and doubling for Bank Holidays, we have used more than one agency during this time and the care has also been excellent, where I have not been happy with an individual carer they have not been sent again.
112 posts