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Care home fall concerns -Carers UK Forum

Care home fall concerns

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Hello, my mother has Parkinsons and Parkinson's dementia and we recently tried live-in care, but after trying two separate carers it didn't work out. Mainly because they found it hard to deal with my mother's balance problems, needing to shadow her all the time.

I have thought about maybe now is the time for a care home, however, after thinking about it a lot, I now don't know how this is going to solve anything. When my mother doesnt have Parkinsons symptoms, she is full of energy at times, and very fit. But is always in danger of falling, lunging backwards etc, which happens almost every day.

I've read that falls are more likely in a care home than at home, and more serious, and having viewed lots online, the amount of objects, table edges, etc etc that my mother could go flying into with high energy, alarms me. And what about when she is in her bedroom? Someone may take her to bed for a lie down and she's immobile, but 15 mins later symptoms have left, and she could jump out of bed unsupervised and end up having a nasty accident. I was for the idea originally, but due to her exceptionally fluctuating mobility problems I don't think she would last long before having a worse injury than at home. And she's too mobile to be in a hospital permanently.

Maybe it wouldn't be so bad as I'm now thinking, but I don't know what the answer is anymore, any advice would be much appreciated.
You have explored every other option, including live in carers, so I'm afraid residential care is the only remaining option.
Will she be self funding, or funded by Social Services?
bowlingbun wrote:
Tue Aug 17, 2021 7:38 pm
You have explored every other option, including live in carers, so I'm afraid residential care is the only remaining option.
Will she be self funding, or funded by Social Services?
She will be self funding with the sale of the house. The safest option would be two live-in carers but obviously too costly.

I was really getting used to the idea of a care home but can't believe it now means I will be putting her somewhere more dangerous. I don't have any other concerns about care homes other than this. She would be fortunate enough to afford a good one, but I can't see how this severe balance problem will mean she's safer.
Hello
My late husband was in a nursing home sadly. His consultant said it was unsafe for him to be allowed home. It was to be honest. A care or nursing home have staff 24/7. A couple of the residents were prone to falls so had what they call one to one. The residents were never on their own. Would that be a possibility?
Pet66 wrote:
Tue Aug 17, 2021 8:01 pm
Hello
My late husband was in a nursing home sadly. His consultant said it was unsafe for him to be allowed home. It was to be honest. A care or nursing home have staff 24/7. A couple of the residents were prone to falls so had what they call one to one. The residents were never on their own. Would that be a possibility?
Yes definitely, if I knew she was never left alone much (or at all, to be honest) I'd feel much more at ease. I guess I'll need to enquire more about it all with the homes, but thanks you've reassured me somewhat.
Sorry for your loss.
George,

just a suggestion - would she be better with 24/7 care at home, but instead of one person living in, people caring for her in shifts of a fixed time. This way they wouldn't be shadowing her all day every day - just while on shift until the next carer arrived and they would go home. Just a thought, until she is less mobile and a care home therefore less of a risk.

Melly1
Melly1 wrote:
Tue Aug 17, 2021 9:48 pm
George,

just a suggestion - would she be better with 24/7 care at home, but instead of one person living in, people caring for her in shifts of a fixed time. This way they wouldn't be shadowing her all day every day - just while on shift until the next carer arrived and they would go home. Just a thought, until she is less mobile and a care home therefore less of a risk.

Melly1
Hi Melly,

Yeah that would be ideal but it's the cost that would be the problem. Social services already raised her direct payment amount by a lot recently, but is only enough to pay for one full time live-in carer. If money wasn't a problem then 2 live in carers taking turns would work well and there's plenty of space but I don't think she will get anymore funding for that. Others coming in taking shifts would be quite costly too I'd imagine.
Hi George,
I can’t see social care paying for two live in carers, either.

Is the live in carer paid by the hour?

Melly1
In your situation, if mum has over £23,000 in savings, then use that up on home carers first, and then remortgage the house, if she wants to stay there.
However, if the danger of falls is great, do investigate NHS Continuing Healthcare, which would give FREE care. It's very much a postcode lottery, but if she doesn't get it the first time, then that first assessment would be useful later when there is a second or third one, to show how much deterioration there has been.
Melly1 wrote:
Wed Aug 18, 2021 10:39 am
Hi George,
I can’t see social care paying for two live in carers, either.

Is the live in carer paid by the hour?

Melly1
Hi Melly, a live in carer through an agency was costing £895 per week so it was based on weekly rates not hourly.