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Carers UK Forum • Call yourself a carer? - Page 9
Page 9 of 15

Whichever way you look at

Posted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 4:01 pm
by Scally
Whichever way you look at it, child carers will always be an emotive and heated topic. As it stands they get almost no help at all, it really is a disgrace. I'm sure we we are all agreed on that. But as 10% of the population has a disability, and 90% of adults have children, then "abolishing child carers" would present a massive, insuperable, problem.

Funnily enough, the subject of her own needs and wishes did come up as part of the interview script, and she rather shyly explained that she didnt mind helping her mum at all, but she would love the chance to go horse riding sometimes like her friends from school.
A very small ask, really.

Surely that cant be beyond the ability of social services/ childrens carers projects to organise a direct payment so she could do that? It would be a tiny amount of money compared with the help she is providing.

With young carers, the main

Posted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 6:08 am
by charles47
With young carers, the main problem is that they are even more invisible than adult carers - partly because they often don't want to be seen and partly because people don't really want to see them. Can't comprehend that sort of life, perhaps? And yes, as with adult carers, often all these kids want is just a little time of their own to do as they want.

I was talking to a carer yesterday at the office (we're open some Saturdays to be available to carers who can't make weekday contact). She was very distressed because of the way her caring situation had developed. Turned out that everyone had told her what was wrong with her caree but no one told her what it meant or how it might affect her caree. And for all the hype about talking therapies, no one had offered her that either. Money wasn't the problem here - she needed information (duly provided), a friendly listening ear that was able to show a little empathy, and counselling (referral made).

Sometimes what people need is very low cost and can still make all the difference.

Here in Australia, you're considered

Posted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 12:29 pm
by SandySea
Here in Australia, you're considered a carer if you receive a total or partial carer's pension.

If a person cares for someone disabled, but also works full time and thereby doesn't qualify for a carer's pension, then they are - as was said earlier in this post - a secretary or plumber or shop assistant or whatever they are, and they care for someone in their own time.

In the same way, if a mother (or father, let's not get sexist here, lol) chooses to go out to work and care for her (his? this will get tedious so let's drop it) healthy children before and after work, she doesn't call herself a carer. If she chooses instead to stay home and care for her children full time then she doesn't qualify for a carer's pension, and nor would she expect to. And if one of the children gets sick and she cares for that child, she still doesn't call herself a carer - she calls herself a mother!

I find it interesting that the word "caring" seems to have taken on competitive overtones. Caring is actually an emotive word, not a badge of honour or a victim's burden - aren't we supposed to care for each other? Indigenous people usually care for their elderly and disabled family members, but I doubt any of them would consider calling themselves carers - they're simply caring family members!

By the way, earlier in this post someone mentioned that being a full time carer means you don't get the opportunity to earn extra money because you can't go "out" to work. If you're posting on this forum then you're at least basically computer literate. And if you're computer literate, there are 100's of ways to earn extra money at home! Image

By the way, earlier in

Posted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 1:19 pm
by Guest
By the way, earlier in this post someone mentioned that being a full time carer means you don't get the opportunity to earn extra money because you can't go "out" to work. If you're posting on this forum then you're at least basically computer literate. And if you're computer literate, there are 100's of ways to earn extra money at home! Image
I doubt that being in a position to post a few sentences or paragraphs on a good day would bring in much money Image Image .

By the way, earlier in

Posted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 2:01 pm
by Alexr115
By the way, earlier in this post someone mentioned that being a full time carer means you don't get the opportunity to earn extra money because you can't go "out" to work. If you're posting on this forum then you're at least basically computer literate. And if you're computer literate, there are 100's of ways to earn extra money at home! Image
Especially if you have a webcam and a filthy imagination Image Image Image

Posted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 2:06 pm
by Guest
Image Image Image Image

Funnily enough I met a

Posted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 2:39 pm
by Scally
Funnily enough I met a chap last month who hangs around his house all day in his pyjamas and plays computer games. A slob? Maybe... but here's the catch...
He also puts in an hour every day playing the stock market online, and because he is rather good at picking stocks, makes at least £16,000 a year profit from small trades.

I used to work from home designing websites for people, andf I still make some cash from search engine optimisation for clients - pocket money maybe, but it all helps.

Most authors work from home; I used to write a regular review column in a specialist healthcare magazine that netted me another monthly cheque.

There ya go Excalibur I

Posted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 11:54 pm
by SandySea
There ya go Excalibur Image

I design websites for people too - as long as they know up front that they're not going to get it yesterday, I'm able to do a bit at a time.

I also have an on-line second-hand bookshop, and buy the books at charity shops when I get my half a day off per week.

I also write articles for magazines - forget the Great Novel, at my rate of time-to-myself it would take until NEXT century to complete it, but a short article can be achieved in a week or less.

I also sell items on ebay - unwanted items, or things purchased at charity shops that I know will sell quickly.

I also collect rare videos at charity shops and transfer them to dvd (only if they've never been made available on dvd) and sell them to people around the world who have been searching for that particular movie.

Nothing makes me a fortune simply because I don't have the time to devote my all to it, but every little bit helps and gives me a feeling of having some control over my life.

There's no limit to ways to make money on the internet - but as long as we think it terms of "going out" to work, or "being employed", we'll continue to feel like victims who are being denied opportunities.

Opportunities aren't merely presented to us on a gold plate - WE have to create them. Image

Carers have lots of negotiable

Posted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 12:00 am
by Scally
Carers have lots of negotiable skills, but if people have been in salaried employment all their lives, they tend to underestimate how valuable and negotiable these skills really are.
Once you have the flexibility of not caring about a regular paycheck and regular hours, you have an immediate advantage in the economy, because lots of wealth-creation opportunities simply arent 9-5, Monday to Friday.
Carers need to think out of the box. I did that a few years ago, and I have never looked back. There is no way I would want to go back to the 9-5 slog now: I work when I want to, I slack off when I choose. And if I feel like a swim and sauna or a long country walk; well, that's what I do.

You are both fortunate in

Posted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 12:03 am
by Guest
You are both fortunate in being in a position to earn as well as care if that is what you choose to do, not everyone is in that position, this does not make them victims, they are simply living their lives in a way which fits in with their circumstances, the ability to earn is not everyone's priority, neither is it a feasible option for some.