BBC1 Care

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Also, not sure where the drama was supposed to be set ('Up North'???), but £700 a week for a lovely upper crush residential care home for someone who was going to have high nursing needs (wheelchair, aphasic, behavioural aggression etc etc!) was DIRT CHEAP.


Again, total cop out.
Oh, AND let's hope the poshie private care home has a Secure Unit as well - since Alison Steadman seems to have wandered off from the cheapo council funded one!!!!!
Crosses over into yet another thread ... GREEN PAPER one ... and the patient with both cancer and dementia conundrum ?

NHS and / or social care ... different systems with different ways of funding.

Threads ... all just part of the bigger picture ... no wonder they interlock so much ?
Hi,
Bear in mind that most carers with carees suffering from stroke and/ or dementia probably won't want to watch this, therefore the main audience will be the general public; I think it was hard hitting.

The reality of juggling working, caring and childcare was portrayed, helicopter relative included, financial difficulties affecting the whole family ( children couldn't go on trip/holiday,) hospital very ready to discharge the mum ASAP, the often hidden taboo of dementia causing aggression....
It will have opened the eyes of many.

I didn't think the CHC part was glossed over, the hospital did try to discharge without a CHC being done properly and accurately. The family had gathered crucial evidence, that couldn't be disputed and although the panel agreed CHC in the first instance, it did deem the assessment needed to be done again ...

I do agree the fees for such a nursing home were unrealistically low and of course there wasn't enough time to show the ongoing battle families have over attention to detail in the care of their carees.

Melly1
Yes, that's a fair point, that most of the public haven't a clue when it comes to the cost of care, etc etc. And probably quite a few people would think 'ah, stroke, that's obviously a medical problem, so it comes under the NHS, why shouldn't it?.....not realising that if the stroke causes dementia (or behaviour perhaps indistinguishable from dementia???) then dementia falls under means tested SS/Local Authority Council funding.

I don't know (not having watched anything but the ending yet!) whether that tricky issue was raised by the programme? If not, it certainly should have been!

I'm not saying a second assessment wasn't necessary, more that I think the attitude of the Appeal Panel was FAR too sympathetic and 'lenient'.

We really need to see some stats - ie, how many stroke patients presenting-with-dementia-like-symptoms DO get CHC funding (if the symptoms are as severe as that of Alison Steadman's character). (And if that varies noticeably on a geographical/post code basis).

The whole ending just left me with a sour taste though - how nice, how easy, how lovely-jubbly, etc etc etc! We just get the poor old NHS to fork out a fortune (how many nurses could they hire for £700 a week, the cost of the poshie care home??) and phew, that's OK for us then, isn't it? Job done! Evil NHS defeated! Boot-faced Discharge Nurse left with egg on her miserable lying face (etc etc etc)
One comment made on the Daily Mail's review was that one of the sisters blissfully announces that she's going to give up work and look after mum, and live off Carer's Allowance......

Don't know whether that happy idea got shot down in flames for the character!!!!!
For that old circular argument , said Daily Chuckle believer could also add :

" She chose to care ... what's her problem ... why pay her for it ? "

... and so the general public's conception of us will continue ...

Even poor old CUK ... and their releases :

" They would say that , wouldn't they ... ther'e merely protecting their members/ interest. "

( Thanks to Mandy Rice Davies's infamous comment on Lord Astor for the first bit ... now 55 years ago ! )

... and so on ... round and round in ever decreasing and frustrating circles ... eventually disappearing over the event horizon.
I've been wondering since I saw the end of this yesterday whether any TV drama could have the effect of Cathy Come Home in these days when we are overwhelmed with information and documentaries. I don't think this was very effective, but I don't see how it could have been. It did not come over as though the author was really familiar with the care situation - for example, the CHC appeal was like an old-fashioned drama round the table, and I suppose that is the way it is done in a play, and there wouldn't be time to show the form with all the categories. The whole thing was designed as a conflict between individual characters, as these things usually are. You couldn't really show ten social workers or nurses consecutively being incompetent - it would take too long. I didn't think it was dreadfully well done - the acting was OK.

The test to see if the mother could look after herself in her own home seemed a bit unconvincing to me, but again, it was the style of the drama.

CHC came over as easy to get - and let's face it, you don't usually get it for dementia. This dementia was the direct result of a stroke, presumably to make the story fit in 90 minutes. Financial problems were touched on, but seemed to have more to do with the main character losing her job and her feckless ex-husband than with carers' allowance.

I did see Melly's message and I can see that some of it is right - have not read all this thread though.
I found myself wondering why they opted for stroke as the cause of the mum's need for care. There were several reasons perhaps, including the dramatic (and very scary) car crash at the beginning. I guess that also showed the HUGE contrast between 'old Mum' (perfectly 'normal') and 'new mum' (vacant and aggressive and frustrated etc etc etc).

I do also wonder whether the author chose stroke precisely BECAUSE it (could have!) highlighted the 'artificiality' of the divide between 'medical illness is covered by the NHS/CHS' whereas 'dementia is means-tested by the SS'. But since they really didn't dwell on this at all there wasn't really any point in having her need 'dementia care' because of 'medical stroke'.

The whole thing seemed to be a polemic about the 'bad and mean old NHS not forking out for the luxury care home, whinge, whinge!'......as if the entire problem of the UK's dementia care cost could just be 'sorted' if the mean old bad old NHS forked out the extra £300 a week (that's what the private care home manager reckoned was the difference between what the SS would contribute, ie, £400, and what family - or NHS! - would have to pay as top up to meet the £700 a week private cost).

Like I say, the 'core issue' - whether stroke-induced dementia is 'medical' or 'social' - was just never addressed.
I also thought having 'subtitles' for Alison Steadman trying to talk was a bit disengenous or whatever the right word would be.

Does anyone have ANY idea whether, when a stroke patient tries to speak, they are actually mentally capable of expressing ANY rational thoughts? (Or, indeed, whether someone with severe dementia is?)

There can only, sadly, ever be 'supposition' that it can. Perhaps 'hope' that it can??

I do think Alison Steadman really portrayed the poor woman very well.

I, too, thought the kitchen competence scene a bit daft, simply because the first minute of the test clearly showed that the mum hadn't a clue, so why keep going on at her until she ate the teabag......?

(I'd never heard of such a test, by the way - not in four years of being on this forum! Totally new to me! Has anyone here ever had it applied to their caree??)

(Mind you, it's a lot more useful than the 'count backwrards from ten and who is the prime minister' test for capacity!)