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Excalibur - Carers UK Forum

Excalibur

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Dont know if this is the correct place to post but as you mention your sons independence skills a lot I was wondering if you could tell us a bit about his school.
In the middle of a fierce battle with my sons school and would appreciate you or anyone else's experience.
TIA
Vicky
My son goes to the same school as his older sister did; the local (and rather highly regarded) state run (comprehensive) academy, in this former coal mining town in Scotland.
He has been mainstream all the way; from nursery school, primary school right through to secondary school. Every time there was a transition, we just had to ask the professionals to chill out and give the guy a chance, and every time they ended up advocating for him. It has been fun and games, all the way. Sure, I have had to fight a bit, but usually I picked small things which I could win. If you win the small stuff, the big stuff usually just falls in the bag.
Hi Vicky. My son went to mainstream school from the age of 3. It was a fight in 1988, and the Education Authority did not want him to go there, but the headmistress told me to bring him along, and she would sort the authority out, which she promptly did. No more fuss until he was 12. At the comp, he only lasted six weeks, and they felt he would be best in the special needs school. My husband and I broke our hearts, but our son was not happy at the comp, that was obvious. It seemed to be like a zoo. they were keeping the children with special needs in one classroom,and only lettting them out for dinner break, when they had to stay in one area of the playground. My son went stir crazy, and kept running off(understandably). The Education Authroity supported us at that time to find other schooling, and we eventually sent him to the special needs school, with the option of home schooling with support from our neighbour and her cousin(retired schoolteachers). He went to cubs and canoeing, so was mixing outside school. the special needs school turned out to be the best option all round. He achieved far more than he would have in the comprehensive school.I have also talked to two other local parents whose children did this the other way round, they were just as happy with mainstream secondary education.
Good luck Vicky.
My son started off in Mainstream - his disability is purely physical but he got his head kicked in and tipped out of his wheelchair - he went through hell in mainstream because of the evil little able bodied kids and he went to Ashcraig Secondary in Glasgow which at that time was a school for kids with physical disabilities.

The majority of his classmates who had tried mainstream and then went to Ashcraig went because of the severe bullying in mainstream by able bodied little darlings.

The school was good until they started putting kids with learning difficulties there and this drove the educational standards right down because the teachers were having to spend so musch time with those kids that they didn't have time to spend on the bright kids. This was happening just as my son was of an age to leave school.

My son is now going back to University to study for his Masters degree so special schooling didn't harm him.

Eun
Thanks everyone, interesting to know how other people find the system.
Eun I can empathise even though both my children have learning difficulties because my oldest was bullied unmercifully in mainstream for being "thick" little horrors would come up to him in the playground and ask him what 2+2 = it was so hearbreaking and ofcourse he had no friends and the teachers usually just left him get on with it supported by somebody's mum as a TA.
He eventually after a huge fight by me got into what used to be called MLD, he is happy there and doing well, the only downside is this school is now filling up with what is called EBD children who have been excluded from mainstream school because of extreme behaviours, so we now have the foxes in with the chicken, but I am so on top of the situation and have already let them know what action I will take if there are any more problems.
My youngest is in an SLD school in a unit, no education at all, just faffing around filling up his day, no communication, no behaviour strategies, consigned to the dustbin of life as far as I can see, the secondary dept which he is due to start Sept reminded me of a rest home for the elderly.
Vicky
The main problem with being in mainstream is that my son is surrounded by wanna-be mothers.
They all wanna mother him.
Yes, he gives very good cuddles.
But he needs to be selective. he already has a mother, and the position isn't vacant.
But I have trained him to be mean and nasty in the face of cuddly wimmin.
There is nothing quite so undermining to the male psyche as a well-meaning smotherer.
He's a bloke, for chrissake - .
The main problem with being in mainstream is that my son is surrounded by wanna-be mothers.
They all wanna mother him.
Yes, he gives very good cuddles.
But he needs to be selective. he already has a mother, and the position isn't vacant.
But I have trained him to be mean and nasty in the face of cuddly wimmin.
There is nothing quite so undermining to the male psyche as a well-meaning smotherer.
He's a bloke, for chrissake - .
Image Image Image That post just cracked me up Rob. So very true mate!
I would like to see some wannabe teachers around my son, already know he is drop dead cute in the looks department.
Vicky