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Amelda Redmonds CBE - Page 4 - Carers UK Forum

Amelda Redmonds CBE

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
68 posts
Many carers are in poverty many are not but what annoys me is this so called claim that carers will be out of poverty by 2018 it`s just a load of bull we know at the moment to be free from poverty financially you must have about £150 per week to "live" on.
In 2018 cares will be free from poverty but carers work for £100 per week carers have private pensions all of this will be taken into account and very few will actualy be in so called poverty all we need is for carers to be recognised as valuble "workers" within the social care system and reward us with a decent allowance ....
I must admit i don't see the predicament of us full time carers given much priority let alone "key priority". As far as I can tell all the emphasis is on working carers -as if we full time carers don't work.

To me the charities should be concentrating on those of us who care full time. If you are able to go out to work then you are not a full time carer - end of story.

Eun
Excalibur,I agree we have what we have in terms of award.I never met my Great Grandfather.He died in the great war.But his medals are valued by me.For the freedom he,and others gave us all.But,I dont find CEOs of charities are ever worthy of a gong.Only my view.The one time I felt ever moved to nominate a soul for an award,it was not a CEO. Image
I must admit i don't see the predicament of us full time carers given much priority let alone "key priority". As far as I can tell all the emphasis is on working carers -as if we full time carers don't work.

To me the charities should be concentrating on those of us who care full time. If you are able to go out to work then you are not a full time carer - end of story.

Eun
Every carer of working age who wishes to work, should be supported, enabled and encouraged to do so, because there are very significant benefits, socially and in terms of their mental health, not just income. I have no idea where you get the idea that working carers get priority, can you back this up with some evidence please, because most working carers regard the £95 earnings threshold as an abomination, a double whammy, an insult, but very people are aware of it.
We've had this discussion about what is or isn't a 24/7 carer here:

http://www.carersuk.org/Forums/viewtopi ... &start=120

As for who CUK works for, surely it should work for all carers? In the CUK Annual Report, published in November, it was stated:

[quote]“The Strategy was very disappointing on carers benefits. It promised to review carers benefits as part of wider welfare reform. There was no immediate relief for carers in poverty. As no timetable has been given, we shall step up our campaign on this issue.â€
And the elected Trustees in turn, are guided by the members and branches views, and to some extent by the wider views coming from our partners and allies across the whole sector. There are lots of "sub-categories" - child carers, black and ethnic minority carers, gay carers, disabled carers, male carers, working carers, pensioner carers, Welsh, Scottish and Irish carers, single parent carers, etc: - and we have members from all these "minority" groups who all, quite rightly all feel that their own situation requires urgent attention and redress. Thats the nature of democracy ... and shows the sense in campaigning for all carers and recognising our diversity but also our shared interests.
One universal fact of life when it comes to carers is that no one size ever could fit all diversity being a bi-word for carers,who,by their very nature are so individual.each has an axe to grind all of its own.just causes the lot of em too.I suppose it shows as no one body could ever embrace the full diversity,carers must be,forever,fragmented.at best a loose collective,which,perhaps,further shows that no one person getting any sort of gong for being a spokesperson for carers can credibly be rated as the voice of this vast diversity.folly of the tarnished awards system ofcource. Image
Up to a point I have to agree, Maxi.

The one thing that unites carers is the fact that they are carers. But every carer's individual experience (and therefore their need for support) is different. No one organisation or individual can hope to meet those needs, or the wide range of aspirations. But taking the profile of carers in the media, and in politics, there has been a shift.

Take the Mirror campaign last year, for example: a national daily picking up the message that the government doesn't do enough for carers and actually running with it for more than one small feature. Then there was the protest this week: MPs actually talking to carers. The majority of social care policy work at local levels now requires carer involvement. And not before time.

No one person is or can be responsible, but it has been recognised that Imelda Redmond has been a key player in these, and other, achievements. For such a small national charity (and approximately £4m a year turnover is very small), Carers UK is recognised as punching well above its weight. For some idea of what has happened at CUK since Imelda became CEO, it's probably worth looking here - the article's a few years old but the main points are there:
http://www.communitycare.co.uk/Articles ... -learn.htm
I still claim the six million is a big problem, we have 750-000 claiming the carers allowance some of them may also be working for the £100 per week, we have carers looking after more then 1 caree , pensioner carers , students, and carers who are able to work full time , children who care for parents or siblings.
i have said before you dont have to wipe bums all day long to be a carer, but i believe the day will come when all elderly/young disabled will have to be assesed as to the level of care they need, only then will they agree for family members to be paid for looking after them.
carers uk say a carer is someone who looks after a family member , friend or neighbour in this day and age it`s good that someone will look after a friend or neighbour, but the tax payer will never be happy to pay you for doing so.
if in the future it is agreed that someone needs care 24/7 we should have a system that will decide the best form that the social care will take, care / rest home or if available family member to care if we go down the route of family member they have got to be paid the rate regardles of their own financial status , rich and poor alike if you work as a carer you deserve to be paid .
but back to the six million it is such a large number and once we talk of paying all carers the cost will be far to high for the tax payer, look at the 150 million for respite care, it was worth what just a few quid per week and how many carers have used the respite care all six million i doubt it , yet the government made the claim we have helped some six million working carers with respite breaks .....

we must not start talking about levels of care provided, a carer is a carer simple as that, we will end up with some carers on low allowance and yet they may be on hand 24/7 others may do heavy work now and again but may well be on a higher allowance the carers allowance should be set at one rate i would rather we all received the same allowance at a slightly lower level then some get more then others .....
(I've given up trying to keep to topic - it's obvious this is where everyone wants to take it Image )

George, if the government or politicians are likely to even consider paying carers, it's most likely the non-relatives they'd support first. No family "duty" to consider.

People talk about the 6 million as though it's a problem number. It isn't. Not every carer needs high levels of support any more than we all need the same amount of cash to live on. But it's true that those at the heaviest end of caring need more support and it's still too hard for them to get it. The government relies on carers and pays peanuts in support of carers. And that has to stop.

According to the census, over a million carers provide more than 50 hours a week of support. It would be interesting to know how many carers are receiving support from the authorities through carers assessments. I'd bet it's a much smaller number.
68 posts