Bone shakers !

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Last week my wife went to hospital by NHS ambulance,
s distance of some 15 miles and I travelled with her.
When I have been there before by car the roads seemed reasonable and not too uneven.

It was not an emergency so the ambulance only drove within permitted speed limits.

But the ambulance's suspension was terrible, shaking us about on those same roads.
I shudder to think what it would have been like with blue lights on!

This was in the Midlands. Are all NHS ambulances like this?
I went with mum in an NHS Ambulance, was horrified at the ride. If lorries can have air suspension these days, why can't ambulances?
bowlingbun wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 3:30 pm
I went with mum in an NHS Ambulance, was horrified at the ride. If lorries can have air suspension these days, why can't ambulances?
Yes, of all the types of people travelling by road one would think that a smooth journey
be a top priority for the sick, injured and even those dying.

But I supposre it's money yet again.....
Better ambulances = less nurses.
We had to stop using the park and ride into Oxford when I was an outpatient at the John Radcliff and NHS Nuffield hospitals.
The way the buses slammed us hard on every pothole and sunken gully was too much. We were in no fit state for the clinics when I arrived. Using normal buses in this town isnt an option either for the same reasons. After so many times of being slammed down into the seat I am not able to hold a reasonable conversation with anyone. This is to do with my spinal and pelvic ill health. Public transport is not an option for me.

The only way to travel smoothly to hospital is in the air ambulance and I've done that but I wouldn't want to make a habit of it thank you. :D
I had the misfortune to have use hospital transport last summer, there was no discernible suspension to the vehicle, my seat was just a hard uncushioned seat in the back and my wife was in her wheelchair. It was the same model of vehicle there and back but two different vehicles and the ride was equally bad both ways. Coupled with the four and a half hour wait for the ride home I'd say it's right up there as one of the worst days of my life.
Ayjay wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 4:30 pm
I had the misfortune to have use hospital transport last summer, there was no discernible suspension to the vehicle, my seat was just a hard uncushioned seat in the back and my wife was in her wheelchair. It was the same model of vehicle there and back but two different vehicles and the ride was equally bad both ways. Coupled with the four and a half hour wait for the ride home I'd say it's right up there as one of the worst days of my life.
I can totally relate to that feeling Ajay.
The journey I used to do was perjury and I just kept my eyes closed the whole time waiting for the next crunch. Without the use of our own car we would become housebound.
'round 'ere ... pacer trains and buses that ride worse than pacer trains.

As more in percentage terms use them ( Poorer area ) , Hobson's Choice ?

And , as the evenings become brighter ... lighter shades of grey ... the Twirly Season for me beckons ... and the delights
of West / South / East Yorkshire / North Derbyshire ... the scenic route ... villages and hamlets that still appear on maps
... known locally as " The Wastelands Tour. "

Any further , and I'll need to a pack a tent for the night.

Six / seven hours ... in three / four buses ... only to spend an hour , if lucky , at the chosen destination ?

Welcome to the wonderful world of twirling ... the only thing going for it ? ... it's free when that State pension kicks in !

Time to reinforce that posterior and lower back of mine , me thinks ?
I have written to my MP about these NHS ambulances, asking him to raise this
with the health minister.

I will let you know what he says in reply.
I daresay that I will be given another, 'rough ride.' ha ha ha
According to my mechanic son, they are built on a van chassis, so they have fairly heavy duty springs.
bowlingbun wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 9:33 am
According to my mechanic son, they are built on a van chassis, so they have fairly heavy duty springs.
Whoever placed the contracts for the ambulance fleets should be fired.