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A weariness is about - Carers UK Forum

A weariness is about

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
As a volunteer, I talk to groups, individuals and organisations about all matters regardng the challenges of being a carer. What I am finding is that there is a growing despondency and weariness amongst people who are unpaid Carers. The growing demands on Carers as social care services are reduced or denied, the lack of Community health care services to sustain the cared for at home. It is difficult to counter this malaise, so many broken promises. In 2008 it felt we were on the cusp of a new dawn in terms of care provision, but now I fear we have regressed so far, people have lost heart. I have also noticed an apathy when it comes to getting support for Carers Week this year. Something needs to change to give people hope.
Mmmm ... a trend that first started in 2004 with the first wave of LA cutbacks.

Best thread that provides a blow by blow account , starting in 2007 ?

https://www.carersuk.org/forum/news-and ... hilit=2009


Suffice to add , the chasm between family / kinship carers and the two major supporting organisations has never been greater.

One only has to look at the state of the nation ... 1 in 4 below the official poverty line ... including HALF the carer army ,
some 3.8 MILLION ... and the policies being persued by both organisations.

Support ?

What's left hardly worth mentioning ... and , for far too many , priced out of reach !

Nowadays ... EAT / HEAT / ROOF ... if one can mainaged all three , they'll be doing well !

A stcking plaster over a gaping wound ?

( Carers week ? Little short of a publicity exercise for ... our supporting organisations ... little ever filters down to CarerLand
... not one mention of the 100,000+ needing a food bank in order to survive ? )
I totally agree.
I know the vast majority of parents of an adult with learning difficulties in my area. Long ago I formed a charity for ANY parent who thought their child had a special need, even if it wasn't yet diagnosed. A proper diagnosis could take years, but the need for support was immediate.
Through summer playschemes, trips out, etc. we all got to know each other well. The children are now all around 40 years old, and the parents are now around pension age.
My health problems meant my son had to go into boarding school at 16, and he never moved back home fully afterwards. He now lives in a flat, with carer support.
My friends were horrified when he went into residential care "How could you put M in a home?" was something I was often asked. It was a beautiful place, with lots of friends, lots of activities, and lovely grounds, M loved it, until it changed hands and all went pear shaped very quickly!
Those same friends are now telling me that they wish they had done the same as me.
Their son or daughter still living at home, they are exhausted and ill themselves. Every cut the government makes means that carers have to do more. The award winning day centre has closed down. "Support in the community" means a carer taking three service users to a coffee shop!

I have had years of battling with Social Services, my friends say "If YOU can't get things right for M, what chance have we got?"
We are all worried about who will arrange proper services for our children when we die.
When the county council ran services there was some continuity, but now private companies are contracted, there is no continuity whatsoever.
As younger parents we had energy to spare, now we are just "firefighting" or in "survival mode". Carer support? Forget it!
There is no spare energy left for anything now.
A worthwhile post but is it really surprising? Carers are already stretched to limit, mentally, physically and all too often financially, with no hope in sight. The social care paper is still awaited, Brexit, elections and climate change taking up much of our political energies. Whereas there is hope in the requests for monthly contributions to find a cure for XXX disease with research promising breakthrough treatments, carers support and finance seems to be a drain on precious resources with little apparent direct benefit to those outside of carerworld.

This will be my third year of being aware of Carers Week and my 15 month stint at caring for mum is now over. The news that Carers Week is coming up led to me sighing and wondering "ho, humm, who cares?!" .

Twice I have offered to distribute Carers UK carer guides to local GP offices, and twice I have been told I'd receive some in the mail, and have been waiting for months on end to receive any. Unfortunately, it's easy to think that our carer organizations are just going through the motions without a lot of follow through or measurable beneficial results FOR THE CARERS THEMSELVES.

I'd love to be proved wrong this year.,.......
Rosemary, that sums it up really well.

It's left me wondering what the total income of Carers UK was last year?
What benefits have carers, individually, had as a result?!
From elsewhere on this site ... 5 years worth available in .pdf format :

https://www.carersuk.org/about-us/what- ... ual-report

Not wearing me deerstalker today ... time for others to cast their magnifying glasses over these.

Good start will be the " Notes " to the accounts ... should provide the breakdown ?
What benefits have carers, individually, had as a result ?!


I'll leave that juicy half volley to others ... crosses over to many threads.

Part of a much larger question that keeps repeating itself for the past 15 years or so ?

A question had could have been asked on the now defunct CARERS UK : YOUR ORGANISATION section.

A misnomer if every there was one ?
Thanks, BB. Perhaps Michael would care to comment? Maybe even send a box of the latest guides he's promised twice before? My offer to distribute is till open, btw.
I can agree with this,

I feel like generally while we all have our own difficulties in all shapes and sizes, we (including non-carers) seem to be simply struggling so much at present, that where as you should be praised for being brave enough to actually ask for help, you are instead greeted by a response of silent sigh's and rolling eyes as if to imply "oh another" as if we were worthless and just another burden to be shouldered, it is wrong.

Society goes into survival mode and any pre-established sense of morale code goes out of the window as it seeks to preserve itself.

In place of any meaningful, life changing support you instead might be lectured or deflected by talk of how bad it could be, how bad others have it, how it once was (the "good old days"), you are lucky to have what you have, how well your coping, etc.

Trouble is managing well in the face of adversity is little comfort as to demonstrating your declining physical health as your practically killing yourself doing a job others can't/will not, or your worsening mental health, sleep deprivation affecting you to the point you barely do any more (if you seldom get the chance) because the PTSD you warned MH services was beginning to bother you and coping strategies weren't working, has advanced to frequent night terrors/flashbacks.
(ironic given mental health week approaching the UK)

Caring has always been a tough thing and a touch of apathy at times comes hand in hand with that, but you begin to really sense it outside of that environment as well, particularly the last 10-15 years, like an increasing/general sense of people having been fed up.

I don't have any answers, as I touched upon in another posters thread discussing UC, I am personally disgusted and ashamed of what society has become.
Rosemary, I'm really sorry you still haven't received the guides you asked for. I'm sure we sent around 20 on the day you last asked for them so will email you separately to check that we have your correct address.

Michael
I so agree with you, Honey Badger.