[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/phpbb/session.php on line 585: sizeof(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/phpbb/session.php on line 641: sizeof(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable
NPH. Normal pressure hydrocephalus -Carers UK Forum

NPH. Normal pressure hydrocephalus

For issues related to specific conditions and disabilities.
As I recently posted about NPH I bought I would bring it to the attention of those who hadn't heard of it before.
NPH can cause short-term memory loss and[/u] balance problems (often resulting in falls). People with NPH may develop a distinctive way of walking 'as though the feet are stuck to the floor'. NPH mainly effects people over 60 years old. The cause is often unknown but, with early diagnosis, people will often benefit from treatment. In medical terms, NPH (Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus) is an abnormal accumulation of CSF in the ventricles of the brain with little or no increase in pressure.

If you have noticed a shuffling walk look up NPH walks on Utube


At first, the symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus are usually very subtle. They worsen very gradually.

Symptoms include:

Memory loss
Speech problems
Apathy (indifference) and withdrawal
Changes in behavior or mood
Difficulties with reasoning, paying attention, or judgment
Walking problems
Unsteadiness
Leg weakness
Sudden falls
Shuffling steps
Difficulty taking the first step, as if feet were stuck to the floor
"Getting stuck" or "freezing" while walking
Urinary symptoms

Inability to hold urine
Inability to hold stool, or feces (less common)
Frequent urination
Urgency to urinate

Kay
Thanks Kay, I'd never heart of NPH. Lots of difficult symptoms to deal with.
Yes it is, however for some there is a Treatment which works for some people.

Having a shunt fitted can drain the fluid and can remove some of the symptoms, its brain surgery and significant surgery but can have fantastic results.
Dad is having one fitted tomorrow!

Kay
Hope it all goes well for him.
Gosh Tim what a time of it you've had! There seem to be very few people that know anything about NPH, yet our surgeon said it's quite a common proceadure. I think he may be the main man for this in the south east where we are from though.

Dad is 79 and has had some small strokes earlier in the year so 2 and a half hour surgery was quiet a risk, however he came out unharmed.

NPH interrupts the signals from the brain, so prior to the op Dad would often struggle to get his legs/feet to move, it was like they were stuck to the floor, he would talk to them and sometimes they would move.

12 hours after the op Dad stood up and took a few steps, he said "I didn't have to to talk to them that time" :ohmy: Itis very early days and he is quiet unsteady and confused but I have a strong hope that he may have got the connection between his brain and legs back. :)
The other area we are hoping for some positivity around is the incontinece, there is a chance that his brain may connect with his bladder control, no signs as yet but hoping.

I hope to be able to bring good news in the coming weeks.
Hi Tim, I'm so pleased you had a productive and informative meeting, hopfuly you will be able to make a plan to perhaps move forward.

I take on board what you say about there not being a cure but a treatment ans for some the treatment may not work ill also look at the link.

Good news.
Dad has been walking up and down the corridor with out getting stuck or falling over, so just over 48 hours after surgery he is being discharged! We still have a very long way to go but the indicators are that he is getting some mobility back.
We were aware via the MRI scans that Dad has significant cognitive decline so we are are not expectîng any improvents there, but who knows.

I'll let you know any improvements when he get settled back at home.
Hi,
Just a quick update and some good news (I know there isn't much of that around)!

Dad continues to do well, he is walking around at home comfortably now, slowly but under his own speed. We take the wheelchair when we are out and about but Dad can walk around 50 meters with the aid of a stick. The incontinence has not come back.

The surgeon is happy and doesn't want to change the flow of the shunt and has basically signed him off!

There is a specialist neuro physiotherapist who knows all about NPH has been to the house twice to advise and is also happy with progress, a local gym has a programme that we may be able to join in with in a month or so to aid recovery.
Happy days 😊

Please please any one who has a loved one who tries to walk but their feet seem to stick to the floor and they have dementia type symptoms please look up NPH. There may be a treatment for them?
Hi,
Have you seen my post yesterday asking if there was anyone else caring for someone with NPH? My husband's experience seems similar to that of your Dad. He had a shunt fitted 2 years ago. How is your Dad now?
Elaine
Good morning,
I am a carer for my husband who has Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus. This was diagnosed almost a year ago but he has had problems long before this. He is waiting for a VP shunt. His operation has been delayed due to Covid but he's now had his pre-op. He is very disabled as he can't stand unaided and he can only walk very slowly with a frame if I walk behind him as he tends to lose his balance. I don't know anyone else with this condition and would like to be able to chat with another sufferer or their carer. Thank you
Jane
Elaine_1707 wrote: Hi,
My husband had his VP shunt fitted on 28 June and was sent home the following day. There was an immediate improvement but now he has Covid, has lost his appetite and just wants to sleep. I hope he will eventually continue to improve.
Jane


Hi,
Have you seen my post yesterday asking if there was anyone else caring for someone with NPH? My husband's experience seems similar to that of your Dad. He had a shunt fitted 2 years ago. How is your Dad now?
Elaine
Hugs wrote:
Sun Aug 19, 2018 7:31 pm
As I recently posted about NPH I bought I would bring it to the attention of those who hadn't heard of it before.
NPH can cause short-term memory loss and[/u] balance problems (often resulting in falls). People with NPH may develop a distinctive way of walking 'as though the feet are stuck to the floor'. NPH mainly effects people over 60 years old. The cause is often unknown but, with early diagnosis, people will often benefit from treatment. In medical terms, NPH (Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus) is an abnormal accumulation of CSF in the ventricles of the brain with little or no increase in pressure.

If you have noticed a shuffling walk look up NPH walks on Utube


At first, the symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus are usually very subtle. They worsen very gradually.

Symptoms include:

Memory loss
Speech problems
Apathy (indifference) and withdrawal
Changes in behavior or mood
Difficulties with reasoning, paying attention, or judgment
Walking problems
Unsteadiness
Leg weakness
Sudden falls
Shuffling steps
Difficulty taking the first step, as if feet were stuck to the floor
"Getting stuck" or "freezing" while walking
Urinary symptoms

Inability to hold urine
Inability to hold stool, or feces (less common)
Frequent urination
Urgency to urinate

Kay