Leg Ulcer getting worse

For issues related to specific conditions and disabilities.
Taken from NICE web site (UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.)

Bleeding associated with aspirin and other NSAIDs is more common in the elderly who are more likely to have a fatal or serious outcome. NSAIDs are also a special hazard in patients with cardiac disease or renal impairment which may again place older patients at particular risk.

Owing to the increased susceptibility of the elderly to the side-effects of NSAIDs the following recommendations are made:

for osteoarthritis, soft-tissue lesions, and back pain, first try measures such as weight reduction (if obese), warmth, exercise, and use of a walking stick;
for osteoarthritis, soft-tissue lesions, back pain, and pain in rheumatoid arthritis, paracetamol should be used first and can often provide adequate pain relief;
alternatively, a low-dose NSAID (e.g. ibuprofen up to 1.2 g daily) may be given;
for pain relief when either drug is inadequate, paracetamol in a full dose plus a low-dose NSAID may be given;
if necessary, the NSAID dose can be increased or an opioid analgesic given with paracetamol;
do not give two NSAIDs at the same time.
Thank you Albert.
I never take 2 at a time, not even paracetamol. So at the most it's 4 in 24hours, but that's rare.
Interesting to read.My lovely hubby is on lots of medications, but obviously monitored by the nursing staff at the home. I know when he was home with me, medication was needed to counteract side effects of others.