Getting pneumonia.....

For issues related to specific conditions and disabilities.
I can think of lots of good reasons to keep medical notes private. For example, let's say a woman spends all night in hospital yelling in a delirious state: "I want to kill my cheating, lousy, no-good husband", it might not be too clever to let said hubby pick up the notes on his next visit.
Can i butt in and ask a question please. Do you need a POA if you are next of kin? And whar exactly is a POA? Sorry to hijack your thread
Can i butt in and ask a question please. Do you need a POA if you are next of kin? And whar exactly is a POA? Sorry to hijack your thread
It's power of attorney and gives you control/rights should the person you care for take a nosedive and be no longer capable of deciding their future healthcare. As far as I know, it is for the immediate family...not sure.
[quote]I can think of lots of good reasons to keep medical notes private. For example, let's say a woman spends all night in hospital yelling in a delirious state]
Well that's just one (extreme/unlikely) reason...any others, e.g. more normal scenarios?
Hi Amy, there may be things written in there that the medical staff dont want the patient/relatives to see eg if they are thinking that it might be something that is quite sensitive. Usually though its to stop misunderstanding especially where it comes to medical short-hand. I have met someone who was very upset because he said that the doctor called him mad. It turned out that hed looked at his notes and under one test the doctor had written NAD, which stands for "no abnormality detected". I kid you not.
Yes, what you say makes sense. I guess I am more cynical and feel it is more an opportunity for them to be more honest about the condition than they may be prepared to disclose. This is all well and good if patient/relatives seek protection but is not welcome for those who favour knowing the truth. Also do you know what DNR means? Do not resuscitate..............
Amy, they should not have written DNR on mum's notes without discussing with you first. My mum has agreed with the specialists that if she has a very serious problem then she should not be resuscitated (?spelling) because her back was so riddled with osteoporosis that they would probably break her back if they tried. Sadly, when I mentioned this in front of mum the other day (two years later) she said she didn't know, until I reminded her of the conversation, then she remembered and agreed.
Amy, have you asked the doctors if they have decided that resuscitating is not indicated?
With medical shorthand it isnt just the abbreviations, but the context that gives the meaning. eg ?DNR means that they are considering whether resuscitation is appropriate and will want to talk to you; a little circle in front (like a degree sign) means its something that you havnt got, or they arnt going to do. Even if they have just written DNR, you need to talk to the doctors.
If any doctor dared to put DNR on my son's notes they will be the ones requiring resuscitation!! Some doctors do tend to place their own value judgements on the worth of a disabled persons life. This is another reason why our son is not left alone with these people for an instant and the reason why his dad and I have to stay in hospital with him as I would hate to see what state he would be in if left to their 'tender' mercies. Particularly after our experiences in hospital with him last year when a respiratory ward claimed not to know how to operate his ventilator, cough assist and nebuliser!!!

Eun
Amy, have you asked the doctors if they have decided that resuscitating is not indicated?
With medical shorthand it isnt just the abbreviations, but the context that gives the meaning. eg ?DNR means that they are considering whether resuscitation is appropriate and will want to talk to you; a little circle in front (like a degree sign) means its something that you havnt got, or they arnt going to do. Even if they have just written DNR, you need to talk to the doctors.
I mentioned DNR because I was astonished to read that this is what it means. The problem is that, in her new ward, the medical file is no longer at the foot of the bed, so I can't even grab a sneaky read. Have they been alerted to me trying to read the notes or is this standard procedure I wonder? ....I don't like it. (There isn't a facility for keeping the file at the foot of the bed though). Not sure whether or not to ask about it, i.e. if I've got it wrong, or if I'm right will I be fobbed off?