Getting pneumonia.....

For issues related to specific conditions and disabilities.
Amy, couple of answers for you.

Pneumonia is an infection which can have MANY possible causes. WHen we are fit and healthy the body protects us from infections from all sorts of agents, including viruses, fungi etc. And mechanical causes also play their part.
As for symptoms, geriatric presentation of symptoms can be very different from a younger persons symptoms. Think about it. Physiology is different as is reaction to medications.
Check it out in detail from any reputable website.

DNR. Assuming your mother has given permission for her medical condition to be discussed with you(as you told us she had granted you the responsibility of attorneyship) then any concerns you have regarding DNR *orders can be discussed with her doctor.

SO..........Just ask at the hospital. Just ask to speak with her doctor or the ward doctor.

Doctors are dealing with this every single day and are used to explaining the implications to relatives.

Do bear in mind that resuscitation is seldom effective for the very elderly and can in fact cause a lingering painful deterioration in overall condition, including painful broken ribs and brain damage. Whatever your wishes I believe the Doctors have a responsibility to act in the patients best interest.

Meanwhile, let's hope there is no need for such decisions and that she makes a full recovery and ... Soon. Image

*Edited to change an A to an R
Thanks Dancedintherain....(did you get your user name from the quote "it's not about waiting for the storm to pass but about learning to dance in the rain"?) Image

Yes I realise getting pneumonia is very diverse/complex and am wondering if she had it before her fall (when the pain from the bruise didn't seem to fit when it was prolonged), since she had been walking more slowly. It didn't fit the classic symptoms, i.e. no fever or shortness of breath...weird. However, the x ray showed that most of one lung was affected so that suggests it was welling up for some time.

The DNR thing cropped up (if you scroll up) in replying re. my indignation about not being able to freely look at her medical notes. I gave it as an example of what could be written, i.e. not that she has this written down (from what I can see - her notes are kept outside the room now - I had thought it to be at the foot of her bed).

DNR seems to imply being unconscious/in a coma? Unlikely with pneumonia? Anyway, tomorrow I give the matron (the ward manager is away on leave) a copy of the POA where I am given rights concerning her health and welfare.

Today she was wheezing a lot (with no productive outcome) - not seen that before. Been almost a week now with the IV antibiotic; they've stepped up the dosage which suggests she is not responding to it. Poor woman is in a lot of pain and this after a week of excrutiating painful gout. I feel for her and feel so helpless. Unfortunately, my tendency to want to do lots to help her is just seen my her as me making too many movements around her bed. Of course the pain makes her irritable too. Very difficult...
I'm worried about my mum's chest infection not responding to IV antibiotics as well. She doesn't seem to be in any pain but is clearly short of breath. However, she is wearing a morphine patch due to a painful shoulder (which should have been replaced 10 years ago). Now, whilst writing this, I wonder if it is masking any pain in her chest? I'll ask the doctor tomorrow. Mum is so bent with the osteoporosis that it's now extremely difficult to x ray her chest, because she is bent right over and can't straighten up at all. I too feel helpless, usually we can have a really good natter about something unrelated to the hospital, but I didn't stay as long as usual so she didn't get over tired. I can't go in every day as M., my son with SLD, is still home for Christmas. If only there was something we could do to help.
DNR. Assuming your mother has given permission for her medical condition to be discussed with you(as you told us she had granted you the responsibility of attorneyship) then any concerns you have regarding DNA orders can be discussed with her doctor.
I am assuming that this is a typo, but DNR means "do not resuscitate" and DNA means "did not attend". It just goes to show how easy it is to confuse things.
Hospital records are always kept in the office. There may be a couple of charts at the foot of the bed, but the actual records are all kept together so that all the medical staff can lay their hands on them immediately and they dont go walkabout. It really isnt to try and pull the wool over anyones eyes.

Sorry to hear about your mum bowling and Amy, if she is not responding to the antibiotic they will probably try a different one.
bowlingbun - so sorry to hear about your mother. How awful not to even be able to sit up straight. At least you have a lead in asking about the morphine patch. As I understand it, the IV antibiotics are supposedly to treat the infection - is this the same thing as acting as a painkiller? My mum is getting a painkiller but I need also to check to see if this is the antibiotic or something else.
Amy, I will answer your questions but first I must reply to crocus ...yes Crocus is correct in that the second time I mentioned DNR I inadvertently typed DNA.... I will edit it in a minute.(thank you Crocus).

1. Yes that IS the quotation I adjusted for my user name. it also applies to me for a personal connection to the world of dance Image I believe in the inspiring philosophy of the quotation too, but no need - or time - to digress!

2. Do not resuscitate refers to not using cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the event of heart failure, or to be precise the stopping of the heart. DNR can involve breaking ribs as referred to previously, when I mentioned some of the risks involved.

2B. Thank you for explaining that DNR is not actually a current issue here and that you were only using it as an example of what one might read in medical notes. Which of course is why direct conversation is so essential as you well know.


3. Did she have pneumonia prior to her fall? Dunno. It is unlikely that the doctors will know for certain either. SO please DONT go blaming yourself in any way, you couldn't possibly have known. (this is one of the reasons why I tried to explain that symptoms vary in geriatrics).


Lastly, I so understand how helpless you might feel. Please try to remember that just being beside her is probably all she needs, knowing that you care.
yes, easy for me to say but not so easy for you, I am sorry I cannot be more helpful, platitudes are what we have to fall back on sometimes. Image


And of course, I hope the communication between you and the medics improves now.

I think I have answered everything. I will make that amendment now and then I have to go out again. back sometime tomorrow i expect, if you need me to clarify anything.
Hi Amy,
Mum had antibiotics in tablet form which didn't seem to be working very well. Then she had a thing put in a vein in the back of her hand (?cannula) so they could give her the antibiotics straight into a vein. Popped in to see mum again today, they've now taken the cannula out, which is a good sign, but in my opinion she still isn't very well. She can't chat to me as well as she could a couple of weeks ago. She has a patch (like a plaster I believe) which is somehow impregnated with morphine and slowly seeps through the skin and acts as a pain killer, especially for her shoulder, which should have been replaced ten years ago and has largely crumbled away. After your post, I asked mum if she had an x ray, apparently they managed to do one with her lying down, as she can't stand, propped up with foam wedges. She said that they were very gentle, it didn't hurt at all. When she was in hospital in August, they were rough when they used the transfer board. As a result they tore the skin over one of her verterbrae, and it still hasn't healed properly. So for the moment, I would describe her condition as stable, but not brilliant.