Caring for someone with an eating disorder?

For issues related to specific conditions and disabilities.
Beat, the largest campaigning eating disorders charity in the UK, is delighted to announce the launch of its much anticipated Carers’ Forum – a completely new website, providing a dedicated space for anyone providing help and support to someone with an eating disorder.

The illnesses – serious psychiatric conditions, currently estimated to affect 1.6million people across the UK – have a significant and often severe impact on not only the sufferer, but those close to them. Parents, siblings, extended family and even friends are often left feeling isolated, bewildered and helpless.

The Carers’ Forum offers a wealth of information for carers: tips on how to talk to someone suffering, issues around mealtimes, and dealing with professionals. Message Boards, an online ‘chat’ facility and a Carers’ Blog are amongst the exciting range of interactive facilities on offer, enabling carers to connect with and support each other.

www.b-eat-carers.co.uk
it is good to see this one. I don't believe Carers are taken very seriously at all,when it comes to eating disorders.
I still believe that my son had an eating disorder, which combined with the Type 1 Diabetes needed to be acknowledged, and treatment given,along with support for the family.
my daughter who is 20 suffers from anorexia. just been given some information by her eating disorder councillor its based on animal analogies. certain animals have different reactions ,responses and ways of dealing with the disorder and depending which animal you may be helps you to change your behaviour and responses to aid the sufferer better. councillor thinks hearing how i am with my daughter i am a dolphin, just enough caring and control. dolphins nudge to safety,sometimes leading the way other times alongside with encouragement or sometimes behind.i totally agree that is me . this comes from The New Maudsley Method
My daughter is 22 and has suffered from anorexia for over 5 years. I too try to be a dolphin but it is not always easy. I have to stop myself being a kangaroo and I'm frequently a jelly fish. I wish there was an easy solution to this horrible illness but sadly I think it is a matter of trying to keep a safety net in place until the sufferer is ready to change.