Mental health meltdown

For issues specific to caring for someone with mental ill health.
108 posts
I agree, there needs to be more understanding of people's feelings, and how to deal with them, in school, especially when there are so many different types of family, one parent, etc. etc. My grandson's infant school is very supportive, very caring, a real nurturing place, but not all schools are like that. The local secondary has over 2,000 pupils! Is that too many to be caring, too easy to have a problem that no one picks up on? Too much emphasis on academic qualifications? Not enough on learning about life? I did law as part of a degree in Business Studies, and feel that towards the end of school days there should be lessons on things like contract law, which I was totally ignorant about. Also, basic stuff about money, and what interest means, especially APR's.
That's great Christine! I definitely agree with you. Keeping our mental state healthy is necessary.
It is.....a healthy mental wellbeing is extremely important.
bowlingbun wrote:
Sun Jul 08, 2018 9:07 pm
I agree, there needs to be more understanding of people's feelings, and how to deal with them, in school, especially when there are so many different types of family, one parent, etc. etc. My grandson's infant school is very supportive, very caring, a real nurturing place, but not all schools are like that. The local secondary has over 2,000 pupils! Is that too many to be caring, too easy to have a problem that no one picks up on? Too much emphasis on academic qualifications? Not enough on learning about life? I did law as part of a degree in Business Studies, and feel that towards the end of school days there should be lessons on things like contract law, which I was totally ignorant about. Also, basic stuff about money, and what interest means, especially APR's.
Great thoughts bowlingbun. Thank you for sharing that. Yes, schools should not solely focus on academic, instead they should teach students life long lessons that would be very helpful for them in the future.
Hi Christine.
I know everything that you have gone through cos my husband has been through the same things. I have had the suicidal thoughts and the voice is telling him to get away from me. He has finally got a co-coordinater and a support worker but that has taken months and months and months just to get this far. He too is waiting on this ctd thingy or whatever it is called. This healthcare say that they are always hear to help but actually they are just full of CRAP !!!. For someone who is having suicidal thoughts , I would love to know where the professionals are. They don't really do shit only when the poor person is so far gone , then it is hard to get the help. I mean , healthcare ,your having a laugh :angry:

Liz
It's so sad knowing about that Elizabeth. Yes,some healthcare do such awful things to us who are in need of their help. It's so frustrating I know.
Hi Elizabeth
It can more often than not take a very long time to access mental health services. I believe early intervention vital when it comes to mental health conditions. The earlier support and treatment is given the better for the person experiencing mental health difficulties. I have experienced just how difficult and frustrating it can be trying to access mental health services. Waiting lists and waiting times to see specialist services can be extremely long and it is horrible to see people that you love or care for going through such difficulties and you are powerless at times as to know what to do to help. Mental health services are at a crisis point with less resources and more and more people now being diagnosed with a mental health condition. I have not personally suffered with a mental health condition but I have had and still do have people that are close to me experiencing mental health difficulties..
Christine
Mental health you wait a long to get any help and when you do they only give the person medicine and leave them to it and chat abt they holidays or what nail they going to have done next. They seem to not care even if the person say he going to kill themselves just drug them up and leave them to it
Grimly, that is because drugs are cheap, and psychiatrists' time is very expensive.....and there are woefully insufficient number of the latter, and counsellors, therapists etc.

I hope I'm not being TOO cynical, but there is a ghastly argument that says a mental patient who has committed suicide is cheaper to treat than one who is still alive and 'needy'.....

(I think the same of anyone with cancer, actually - as my husband had - that it was far cheaper for the NHS that he died, than that he went on living and needed treatment)(and for cancer, the drugs are EXTREMELY expensive - tens and tens of thousands of pounds a year for the latest drugs! MUCH cheaper to let the patients die....)(as my husband did.)

All that said, I guess ALL we can do as the 'patients and carers' is fight and fight to get 'our share' of the meagre resources set aside for us by the NHS.

I wish you all the best possible - however limited that 'possible' is. (shamefully)
jenny lucas wrote: Grimly, that is because drugs are cheap, and psychiatrists' time is very expensive.....and there are woefully insufficient number of the latter, and counsellors, therapists etc.

(I think the same of anyone with cancer, actually - as my husband had - that it was far cheaper for the NHS that he died, than that he went on living and needed treatment)(and for cancer, the drugs are EXTREMELY expensive - tens and tens of thousands of pounds a year for the latest drugs! MUCH cheaper to let the patients die....)(as my husband did.)

All that said, I guess ALL we can do as the 'patients and carers' is fight and fight to get 'our share' of the meagre resources set aside for us by the NHS.
I'm so sorry for your loss Jenny. Yes indeed, we have to fight for our rights as patients and carers. They can't just simply give us some medicines and leave us out there to die.
108 posts