24 hour Live in carers - need some recommendations please

For issues specific to caring for someone with dementia.
My mother has dementia and now needs a 24 hour live in carer, no doubt for the rest of her life.

Which companies are particularly great at providing excellent live in carers?

I've already had Bluebird Care and Homeinstead suggested to me, are they any good or are there any others?

My mother lives in North Somerset.

Thank you
Hiya
Have you discounted the possibility of a Care Home if 24 hour Care is needed? I think whatever company you choose it comes down to luck to a certain extent. Mum has to get on with the carer or actually carers because they will rotate, need days off, time off, holidays, breaks and so on. You have to have absolute trust in the person(s) provided as Mum will be in their sole care for days at a time. There is always the possibility that the carer will leave her employment and Mum will have to start all over again with someone new.
Having said all that I know there are people on this forum who have found a live in carer to be the best choice and a workable solution and I hope they will be along soon to share their experience.
KR
Elaine
My brother and I are thinking that mum would be better off in her own home. Moving her to a care home would mean once again putting her into unfamiliar surroundings which, as proved by her being in hospital, has noticeably exacerbated her Dementia symptoms.

We are also being guided by mum's hospital doctor, various medical staff, the Alzheimer's Society, etc - all say that mum being in her own home would be best for her.

I realise that the carers need holidays, that there will be temporary replacements, etc - this of course creates its own problems.

As for the carer being permanently replaced, that could also happen to any carer in a care home (but at least there will be a few there).

As for trusting the carer(s) that would of course also apply to her being in a care home. My brother and I are extremely fussy and will do our utmost to ensure that mum has excellent care (which is one reason that I posted this message to ask for agency recommendations). :)
You need to make an informed decision. Look at the local residential homes and talk to the Matron/Manager to start with. Finance is another consideration. Has Continuing Healthcare been agreed? If so, then there may be an approved list of agencies. Don't sleepwalk into a nightmare like others have done. It might be better for mum to make one last move to a good nursing home. Think carefully. Are you available to step in at a moment's notice, for example?
Hi, it seems there are not many here who have appropriate experience of live in carersto answer your question directly, shame for you. Suspect it is unlikely you will get a company recommendation, sorry.
They must of course all be registered with the CQC in order to trade.....but I am sure you know that already.

in all honesty, I am not sure a company recommendation would be of great value to you. All I can suggest is to ask any local agencies working in your area if they can supply you with references or contact details from their own clients? Just a thought.
Good luck.
I have many years experience of domiciliary care for my son, who has learning difficulties, lives alone with carer support. My mum also had dom care from a company which also used live in staff. Mum had them a couple of times overnight. Mum in law had dementia and ended up in residential care, FIL just couldn't cope although desperately wanted to.Since my son moved out of residential ito supported living 10 years ago, there have been endless problems, especially relating to poor diet and money management.

Caring overwhelmed my life. Don't let this happen to you. Be really clear that you understand everything that will be involved, then, and only then, decide whether live in or residential is best.
Start by drawing up a shortlist of what you expect the live in to do.
Nursing care qualified or unqualified?
Who will be responsible for arranging medical appointments?
How will the transport be arraned for these? Whose car? How paid for?
Shopping? How will the money for this be managed?
Cooking?
Odd jobs like electtical, plumbing, DIY?
Gardening?

These are just a few ideas for starters, every situation is different, but you need to look at EVERYTHING mum will need to live at home. It's much more than someone just being with mum.
A friend of mine has her dad with dementia living with her, and hires a live in carer for when she has breaks away, or actual holidays. It seems to work well in that the dad doesn't really notice it isn't his daughter and 'accepts' the situation. Though she reports that he is often a bit more 'difficult' when she does return to take over again, and his dementia can seem a bit worse, so presumably even though he is accepting of the stranger looking after him, it does 'register' somewhere inside. (He's still very mobile and 'superficially OK', likes to try and get out of the house, that sort of thing.)

My friend gets her live incarers from a local agency. She lives in an affluent part of the home counties, and the local agency therefore has some 'demanding' customers, who are used to 'high standards' etc etc, so I think she gets a pretty good calibre of care-worker coming in. That said, they are, I should warn you, mostly non-UK nationals, and with some the pronunciation of English has been a bit tricky - so you have to take that into account for your mum, if she isn't 'used' to multi-cultural environments, or English not being necessarily a first language. Even if the carer is trained, or inured, to the 'odd ways' of their elderly carees, it would be horrible if an elderly client with dementia, grown up in a different Britain from now, was insulting in any way.... (obviously, very much hope this isn't an issue, but bear it in mind as a possibility, given the generation gap)

Another factor to take into account is that the live in care-worker is just that - they are they to care....not to do housework! So you may find it necessary to hire a cleaner (if you don't do it yourself of course!) as well.

I do wish you all the best - it is SO difficult, I know from my own experience, when one of the parents becomes too 'acopic' to keep going on their own. They need 'someone else' with them all the time.

One limitation of a live-in careworker, however, may also be that although they are there to provide the physical care, from toileting to laundry to cooking to taking out and about (my friend's father's care workers will go off for walks with him, down to our local café), they may not provide what could be called 'company'.....you may well already have experienced this with your mum, that I did with my MIL, that for example, they can't actually watch TV 'by themselves' any more, in that it doesn't make sense to them, so you need to sit with them and chat them through the programme, and interact with them, telling them what is going on and so forth. Would a live-in carer do that? (Not sure how deep your poor mum's dementia is?)

The whole situation is, though, desperately sad. I would also suggest that it's a sensible idea to have a 'forward plan' for if your mother's condition deteriorates to the point where she does need a nursing home (my MIL needs this now), and whether nursing care could be 'live in' or require residence elsewhere.

Wishing you all the best in finding what you are looking for - it's all so sad, isn't it?
We currently have a live in carer for my parents. They stay 5 days a week, I stay 2 days. So far it's working quite well, we are a month in. Pillar Care is the name of the organisation we use, they are based in London but cover other parts of England I think.