Power of attorney, is it too late?

For issues specific to caring for someone with dementia.
Hi Henrietta,

Dad did sign it ok in the hospital when my cousin was there, she acted as the witness. I am still not really sure though if she is eligible to be a witness. She is my Mum's 'Sister's' daughter..... I am still trying to work it all out if she is allowed to be a witness, so have not sent it off yet.

We wont be selling the house as my Mum really does want to live there, just not on her own.

I don't have any close relatives that disagree with it etc, my two brothers are in agreement to apply for it for them both and happy for me to take it all on.
SEND it off!
Look at it this way.
If it's signed and witnessed, it is then up to the Public Guardian's Office to decide, not you.
If they have any doubts, they will get back to you.
So you have nothing to gain by not sending it. Generally it takes about 3 months to process, so stop procrastinating and chewing it over. Just send it!
Thank you! BowlingBun

It's no good in the boot of my car being driven backwards and forwards, so I will post all of the forms off on Monday.
Good. The sooner you know whether it is valid, or not valid, the better. Then you can start to make plans accordingly. Remember, that you can still apply for Appointeeship without having a POA, so you can handle benefits for your parents (I imagine mum lacks "capacity"?
If they have under £46,000 in savings, then Social Services should pay for some, or all, of any care costs. Presumably they have been claiming Attendance Allowance?
Did you know that someone with dementia is exempt from Council Tax? (Apologies if I've already asked, so many people are unaware of this exemption, I keep asking whenever dementia is mentioned).
I missed your earlier post with some financial details in it. Selling the home so mum can move nearer you might NOT be a good idea, as the LA might say that half the money from the sale could be used to fund dad's care. Whilst it is still mum's home (even if she is staying somewhere else temporarily due to her health) they cannot consider the value of the house when working out dad's financial contribution, if mum is over 60. Be sure to email our CUK advice line for more details, treat this message just as a "signpost".
If dad qualifies for CHC, the NHS will pay the full cost of his care.
DO NOT SIGN TO SAY THAT YOU WILL PAY ANY TOP UP.
Top ups from the client are unlawful, unless it's for a bigger bedroom or other extras, and anyone else is not required to pay anything.
Do NOT believe the LA if they tell you otherwise.
(I reclaimed £8,000 from Hampshire County Council when they didn't apply the rules properly).
Realistically, how long is mum going to be able to stay at the friend's house? Would she be able to stay at her own home with more help? Or is residential care fast becoming the only option for her too?
My witness was a niece (same last name) so you should be fine.
I agree with the previous replies. Great thoughts bowlingbun!