PERSONAL CARE IN CARE HOME

For issues specific to caring for someone with dementia.
Hi this is my first post. My Mum has Alzheimer's and is in residential care. After a fall in the home 2 years ago Mum had to have a hip replacement and has not walked since. There have been a lot of ongoing issues around personal care where my Mum has been toileted on her bed although we have been asking for this not to happen. To cut a long story short Mum was rushed in on a 999 call last week, unconscious and vomitting. Turned out that she was dehyrated and constipated. Her stomach was full of toxins ue to the constipation and this was causing the vomitting. Still waiting for answers to why she was unconscious.
We have again instructed them to hoist Mum onto the special tilt shower/commode chair that was bought but a care staff member has advised that they do not have the appropriate slings to do this as they have been advised that it is illegal to hoist a person with Dementia onto a toilet/commode?

Is anyone aware of this legilsation? We are at our wits end and do not want Mum to go through more than she is going through at the moment. This is not the first time that she has been hosptialised for deydration/constipation athough this was the worst as we thought that we were losing her.
HELP!
Hi Gina - Firstly welcome to the forum.

I can't answer your question as i just don't know the answer, but would have thought it very unlikely that there was 'legislation' in place for this eventuality. Perhaps your local Primary Care Trust can answer it. Otherwise I think I'd be asking the care home to show me the relevant legislation - if they are quoting it they must have a copy of it ? To be honest, in my opinion, it sounds more like an excuse than a reason.

Have you been in touch with the CQC about the problems you have been having with your Mother's care ? Have a look here http://www.cqc.org.uk/

Hope your Mum is recovering now and getting better care.
surely the use of a hoist is the same as in a home care situation ,risk assessment,2 people and adequate training for the people using it,i'd find a better care home
Hi Gina,

I agree with previous posts, I cannot imagine there is such legislation.

To empty the bladder properly and also to be able to open the bowels with ease, a good position is required. If your Mum is not moving at all, this will not help her constipation at all.

Did she not have post-op physio? The whole point of a hip replacement is to improve mobility and reduce hip pain. Even if she is only moving about using a zimmer this would greatly improve her quality of life.

Start asking questions.

Melly1
The only reason not to hoist someone with dementia is in case they become agitated and there is a danger of injury. A risk assessment would have to be taken and there isn't, as far as I know, any blanket legislation covering all people with dementia and hoisting.
if your Mum is bed ridden or getting very little exercise then she is likely to have a very poor transition rate in her intestinal tract. I would say it would be crucial for your mum to have a regulated diet possibly with some special additives or natural roughage/ laxitives etc.

I would contact her Doctor and ask for help with her diet, perhaps a referral to a nutritionist. You may have to pay extra for any dietary special needs at the care home but possibly just a little more care with what she is given to eat and drink. Is it possible to visit regularly to ensure she is being given fluids ? or leave bottled water or fruit drinks with her?

Why arn't all care homes required to have a proper established program to deal with residents that suffer with mental health issues.? its crazy(scuse pun). Most Dementia sufferers are unable to manage anything without prompting or help., My Father has twice stayed at a local home where he wore the same underwear continuously for 8 days and nights ! They don't seem to grasp the fact that you have to take the soiled cloathes away and issue clean ? Image