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Dental treatment for dementia patients - Page 3 - Carers UK Forum

Dental treatment for dementia patients

For issues specific to caring for someone with dementia.
So far mum has not had another stroke. But mum demanded more of them; I couldn't give them to her.
I lied (Triesta, you will hate me for this.) I gave her an iron pill instead. it was white coated like the Voltarol, but a different shape. But mum took it thinking it was a painkiller.
I was stuck between a rock and a hard place. I Couldn't give her more painkillers, but I had to give her SOMETHING!
It worked.
Just the action of taking a pill, any pill, helped.
I hate the deception, but if it helps, and it does, I have to do it. I don't want her in pain.
Am I right to do what I'm doing? I don't know, but I'm doing it anyway.
That sounded like a really good wheeze sajehar Image I am greatly impressed.
You are right - you can only have a certain number of painkillers, but you had to give her something - that satisfied her without overdosing her (its called a placebo Image )
Brilliant
But mum demanded more of them; I couldn't give them to her.
I lied (Triesta, you will hate me for this.) I gave her an iron pill instead. it was white coated like the Voltarol, but a different shape. But mum took it thinking it was a painkiller.
I was stuck between a rock and a hard place. I Couldn't give her more painkillers, but I had to give her SOMETHING!
It worked.
Impressive Sajehar! Image Pity my Dad wouldn't fall for that one, with regard to whisky. (SheWolf daydreams about filling empty whisky bottle with ginger ale, and Dad being totally fooled, even when drinking it.) Placebo effect is pretty useful at times.
No, I think you did the right thing, Sajehar. I think that the deception was justified, and I admire your creativity and imagination! Your parents are very lucky to have you.

Tristesa
Thanks Tristesa
Your thumbs up means a lot to me.

SheWolf, how about this

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... eason.html

If you buy some, you could put it in an old bottle of whiskey. When it doesn't make him drunk he might think that his body has stopped reacting to alcohol and he might decide to not bother wanting whiskey anymore.
Or maybe he will drunk via the placebo effect, simply because he's expecting to. In which case you could give him a bottle every week and it wouldn't matter. Nice thought, if nothing else.
Definitely worth a try on SheWolf''s dad, I should say, Sajehar! What a sneaky thought! -- you are full of ideas!

Our bodies do change their response to alcohol over time anyway. I used to be able to enjoy port after a meal when I was young, but now I have to avoid it because it gives me the most horrendous hangovers. As a student, I could mix spirits and wine without any bad after-effects, but I wouldn't think of risking that now! I must confess that I have never actually been deceived by an alcohol-free table 'wine', but I think I might drink it voluntarily as a pale imitation if (perish the thought!) I had to give up alcohol completely.

Tristesa
Sajehar,

I might try it on him, but I doubt he'd be fooled, as it's the taste of the actual alcohol he seems to like, as much as anything. I tried low alcohol beer on him but he grumbled about it, saying it wasn't 'proper' beer.

I've informed my sisters about his dental situation, so will wait for their comments. I expect they'll agree he needs to have the treatment, but I don't want to make this decision alone. In any case, I think they should both visit him beforehand, just in case things go wrong, you never know at his age.
SheWolf
I think that's wise.
I don't think your dad would be fooled either, but give it a go anyway... you never know? I am an eternal optimist.
My mum does not agree with this; she's an eternal pessimist. Her reasoning is that if you're an eternal pessimist, you can never be disappointed???
She has a point, but I refuse to accept it. We've agreed to disagree....

I do believe mum and me are hitting middle ground. She won't accept my refusal to accept things as they are, and I won't accept her, "If you're a socialist at 20, you have a heart. If your still still one at 40 you don't have a head."
I do not have a head, apparently.
Hi Shewolf
I thought I would give you my experience of my husband with dementia at the dentist. He had seen the same dentist for years and the dentist was on first name terms with my husband. They had sent him letters about checkups but before dementia set in he put off going. Eventually our daughter & I got him there and at that stage he sat in the chair opened his mouth so the dentist could look. The dentist was only going to do something if it was absolutely necessary which he decided it wasn't and we went away happily. The dentist suggested an electric toothbrush which the carers use now. A few months later my husband was showing signs of pain when food got into one. This time at the dentist there was no way my husband was going to open his mouth so the dentist referred us to the hospital. They took 5 out under anasetic and he was kept in for a few days. As my husband doesn't communicate in anyway, it is difficult to know if he is hungry, thirsty or in pain. Occasionally now he still shows that food gets into one and causes him discomfort so we presume that they considered one to be OK. Because we were not in the operating room with him, it is difficult to know. The dentist did send a letter telling them what he thought was wrong. Now there is no way we are going to put him thru that again so hope things don't get any worse.