Dementia research - (my mum - by Jessie)

For issues specific to caring for someone with dementia.
Throughout our turmoil I knew Mum had donated her brain for dementia research - this based on her interest in research through her laboratory work & herbalism over many many years - and this has now been accomplished; we'll get reports within next 12 months.

However, I said to the Research Doctors that I considered my mother would NOT have developed "dementia" if she hadn't taken the medications (statins, aspirin etc.) in attempts to prevent strokes....she would have died many years earlier but without the horrors she later succumbed to.

Thus, I argued, that it was the medications that "caused" her dementia.

To my amazement, they agreed. Said they were well aware that without sophisticated medications most people wouldn't develop dementia (yet would die earlier.)

My father died aged 75 from a massive brain haemorrage but retained his persona, his dignity, he was as handsome & articulate on his deathbed as he'd always been - my mother lived 10 years longer than him until she was 86 - but her last 10 years were spent with "dementia", with increasing fraility and pain and utter loss of dignity & respect. Was her extended time really worth her losing her self, her dignity?
I have just read your post Jessie and it relates so much to my Husband. He had a stroke at 62 and was put on the medications you have mentioned. He has had dementia now for nearly 3 years. he also has vascular disease. I also think it is the statins and other medications that have taken away the use of his legs. He is only 67 now, but seems so much older. I have never seen any of the research outcomes published, maybe it's time we were made aware .
Thus, I argued, that it was the medications that "caused" her dementia.

To my amazement, they agreed. Said they were well aware that without sophisticated medications most people wouldn't develop dementia (yet would die earlier.)
My own view is that the reason we are seeing an increase in the number of people developing various forms of dementia is that we are simply living longer. Go back 30/40 years and the average lifespan was 75-80; 40 years before that the average lifespan was 65-70. Today it's common for people to live well into their 90's.

My Mother (88) has Alzheimer's but is in denial as "none of my family had it". Her Father died aged 62; her Mother was 72 and her 3 sisters were 75, 78 and 81 respectively at the time of their deaths. So we shall never know if they might have developed it had they lived longer.

We have the science to keep people alive much longer than before but not the science to ensure that they have a good quality of life. Nature is not being allowed to have her way.
This is very true, Susie. I recently read a journal article about this ... wracking my brains can't remember where at the mo ....

Melly1
this is an interesting and perplexing topic. Clearly the Government are worried at the trend.
Whilst I agree that longer lives are undoubtably resulting in a much higher incidence of Dementia that doesn't account for the significant increase of cases diagnosed in the past 2 decades in people younger than 50 .

I do wonder at times whether there are environmental factors contributing as well as genetic traits. If you do a little research into the all the chemicals and additives there have been in our food for the past 20+ years it wouldn't surprise me one bit if they wern't a contributory factor.