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Jimmy Hill’s family in turmoil over his battle with Alzheime - Carers UK Forum

Jimmy Hill’s family in turmoil over his battle with Alzheime

For issues specific to caring for someone with dementia.
Hill was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2008, but it is only now being highlighted by his youngest son Jamie, 46, and his sister Joanna, 50. The pair have decided to raise awareness of their father’s illness to highlight concerns over the difficulties that arise when a parent – with a large extended family – becomes too poorly to make decisions for themselves.

Hill, who appeared on Match of the Day from 1973 to 1998, gave joint powers of attorney to his current wife and a solicitor in 2005, when he was still in good health. As a result, none of his children has any say in his future affairs or his treatment.


read in full here
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/ ... imers.html
People have to assign future Power of Attorney when they are still mentally capable, so it is their choice, and theirs alone, who to name. Several people can be listed, and if this man had wished to include one or more of his children by sundry marriages, he would have done so. The complaint is parallel to the family disputes that often arise over bequests (or lack thereof) in wills. We simply have to accept these decisions with a good grace, and whinging about them reflects ill on the family.

Tristesa
Of course the danger is that you leave it too late, and then you have the more expensive option of applying for Deputyship from the Court of Protection: but that requires consultation with everyone who has an interest, and when families are involved, that can be a major headache.
Tristesa, it could just be a case of a solicitor not thinking far enough ahead, or making decisions without discussing things properly.
Tristesa, it could just be a case of a solicitor not thinking far enough ahead, or making decisions without discussing things properly.
Yes, that is possible. But it is equally possible that the arrangement was made in precisely the way Mr.Hill wanted when he was able to consider the matter, and that his children who are now complaining about it simply feel aggrieved. It could well be that they were aware of and content with the arrangement in 2005, but that the inevitable changes in family dynamics that tend to follow a dementia diagnosis have taken their toll, and that the atmosphere within the family has changed, not for the better.

One can list any number of people to hold Power of Attorney (so all children could have been included, and if they were not, that was a deliberate decision), and the forms (at least since 2011) come with quite clear and informative documents explaining the whole subject. My point is that I don't believe there is a general issue here. I think it is simply a family falling-out.

Tristesa
Question Image Image

What about if someone is aware, is still able to participate in discussions, albeit at a much slower pace to take it all in. However, with cognitive skills being affected, signature varies from day to day.

Any advice please?

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The key factors seem to be that the person for whom Power of Attorney is being planned must fully understand the process, and must not be under any duress. One can arrange to have the forms completed and registered while still in perfect health (I am currently arranging mine); the POA will only be activated when or if it proves necessary. It may never be necessary. It can be activated temporarily, too, for instance if a person were in a coma for a while.

I don't think that variations in the signature are that much of a problem. Many people's signatures change or vary when then get older (my mother's was terrible towards the end of her life, but not because of cognitive decline; she was totally compos mentis, but almost blind). The signature is witnessed, as on a will, so as long as the person signing is the right person, and is signing of his own free will, the fact that the signature is a bit wonky is not going to invalidate anything.

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer!! Image

Tristesa
Ha ha. What a lovely way to start my Monday, with a smile.. Image

We have a lawyer Image , and will raise this next time we see him. I was more after experiences rather than legal advice itself. Everything still a learning process with this damn illness.

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Rosemary,

I was lucky. Mum understood (I think) the general principle but did not read or understand any paperwork. The solicitor was well-versed in dealing with confused elderly people and as long as she replied yes to his questions and could sign her name when prompted, he had no problem thankfully dealing with the paperwork. I think I may have been lucky that he applied common sense.

Good luck, Anne x
Thanks Tristesa and Anne

x x