Officially diagnosed

For issues specific to autism / Asperger Syndrome.
Hi all, I have posted in another forum but was referred here, my son was formally diagnosed with ASD yesterday, he is 21 yrs old, I have the report and I have rang to arrange a social care assessment for him and a carers assessment for me, as recommended in the report. But I cant get my head around or understand what the report says, if anyone can help/explain what it all means it would be a great help

My son in the words of the report, sorry I don't understand some of them but they are:
Qualitative Abnormalities in Reciprocal Social interaction, Qualitative Abnormalities in Communication and Restrictive, Repetitive Stereotype Patterns in Behaviour.
Difficulties in social-emotional reciprocity
Difficulties in nonverbal communicative behaviours used for social interaction
Difficulties in developing and maintaining relationships and friendships
Excessive adherence to routines, ritualised patterns of verbal or nonverbal behaviour, or excessive resistances to change.
Highly restricted, fixated interest that are atypical in intensity or focus.
Hyper or hyper reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment.
Hope someone can make sense of all this, it's so confusing, I have no idea what I can do to help him, it's taken 21 years to get to this point and even though I knew there was something its was still really emotional hearing someone confirm it.
Hi Theresa,

I answered your post here:
https://www.carersuk.org/forum/support- ... osed-25164

All that jargon describes the way autism affects your son e.g. He has difficulty with social communication because he has difficulty interpreting non verbal cues such as facial expression, body language etc He has narrow interests and so probably tends to talk only about them, he has different sensory experiences to others.

You could always ask the person who wrote the report to explain it to you or the GP. However, researching autism will also help.

This link might be good as a starting point:
http://www.autism.org.uk/about/what-is/asd.aspx

Ask your son's consultant or GP to refer him to a speech therapist and an OT who he is trained in sensory perception. They will be able to assess your son's communication difficulties and his sensory differences and make recommendations on how these can best be addressed/ supported.


Melly1


Sent from my iPad
Teresa_16011 wrote: My son in the words of the report, sorry I don't understand some of them but they are:
Qualitative Abnormalities in Reciprocal Social interaction, Qualitative Abnormalities in Communication and Restrictive, Repetitive Stereotype Patterns in Behaviour.
Difficulties in social-emotional reciprocity
Difficulties in nonverbal communicative behaviours used for social interaction
Difficulties in developing and maintaining relationships and friendships
Excessive adherence to routines, ritualised patterns of verbal or nonverbal behaviour, or excessive resistances to change.
Highly restricted, fixated interest that are atypical in intensity or focus.
Hyper or hyper reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment.
Hope someone can make sense of all this, it's so confusing, I have no idea what I can do to help him, it's taken 21 years to get to this point and even though I knew there was something its was still really emotional hearing someone confirm it.
Welcome to the forum, Theresa! You will find a lot of support here. I am in Northern Ireland and have three adult children on the autistic spectrum.

I hope by now that you have been able to come to terms with your son's diagnosis and that you are receiving support in helping him. The person who completes the carer's assessment with you should be able to give you some guidance as to how to proceed from here. He/she might also be able to suggest local support groups where you can meet other people who are caring for someone on the autistic spectrum.

The most important piece of advice on this forum is, LOOK AFTER YOU!

Gilli
Hello Teresa and welcome.

My daughter was only diagnosed a couple of months ago and she's 32!! We spent all those years telling the experts that something was wrong but nobody took any notice. I've always known deep down though.

She also has dyslexia and moderate learning difficulties.

I think it's very wrong that they professionals hand out reports like this without explaining what they mean. To put your mind at rest I would contact the person who wrote it and ask for a meeting to go over it so you really understand it.

I have just been reading a new book called Iris Grace. I don't know if you've seen this little girl but she's autistic and has a real talent for painting beautiful pictures and has a Maine Coone cat which goes everywhere with her. I think she's about 6 now but just reading it highlighted, for me, how alike she and my daughter at that age was. No speech, little eye contact, real problems socialising, obsessions and repetitive behaviour. Yet back then not one professional thought there was anything to worry about. :evil: I remember being told by a speech therapist "I bet you a bottle of best wine that she will be talking before she starts school."

I think kids are getting diagnosed much earlier now thank goodness and receiving a lot of help. My friends grandson was diagnosed about 3 and given extensive help prior to starting school and he's now settled in really well and is tested and monitored all the time.