Power of Attorney........interesting points

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Henrietta wrote:
Wed Oct 17, 2018 7:05 pm
I may be out of date but looking back to my office days , when I received copies of POAs , people only ever sent in the page with the relevant bits, and signatures on it not the whole bundle. Maybe times have changed?
Thanks Henrietta....see my reply at bottom.
somethingshort wrote:
Thu Oct 18, 2018 2:18 am
Gorden_1609 wrote:
Wed Oct 17, 2018 8:22 pm
I was granted POA and it took two years to get it.

I got a total of three pages and one had the official stamp and that is all I have to show to prove I have POA as that states in which areas I have POA in

I guess it depends were in the UK live in as to how much paper work or how much they have to cover and how long it takes. I am amazed you got it that quickly.

I think as long as you have the stamped seal which has the details of area of cover you only have to show this not every part of the paper work although I could be wrong as that could be different in other areas of the UK as I am in Greenock in Scotland

I've read all of this with interest. Particularly the one where it took two years.....two years! Sorry to hear that Gorden.This was done through a Solicitor, although I think eight weeks is about the norm (that is the from the time it was submitted to the Office of the Public Guardian . I'm intrigued now and think I will go back to the Solicitor and ask if it is really necessary to send the whole bundle of paperwork to all and sundry. I definitely haven't got a certificate as such? The whole bundle is perforated with holes at the bottom of each page, by the Guardianship Office, which I think is the only proof of having it - no official stamp as such. Hmmm. I will look into this.
Chris From The Gulag wrote:
Wed Oct 17, 2018 5:34 pm
Can be daunting ... and expensive ... at times.

Government's own guidance on Certified P.O.As. :

https://www.gov.uk/power-of-attorney/certify
Thanks Chris.
Your welcome.

Be thankful that the photocopier is part of modern life.

The days beforehand ... many of us can remember those.
Image

This is the certificate I received There is another page to this but this is the seal certificate and all I do is show that when need be,
Hope it help you further.

I have take the person I care for details out not because I don't trust you guys but you don't know who else may read this

Gorden

Attachments

If there is anyone out there who is still thinking about Power of Attorney in advance of need, please do it now! You can then register it with the Office of the Public Guardian as soon as it is made. Then you don't have that awful wait when life is in crisis: you just keep it safely or ask the solicitor to keep it until you actually need to take it to the bank or wherever.
I speak with feeling. Our solicitor suggested we draw them up and register them, when she was doing the paperwork when we moved house. We had never thought about it before, but agreed. Then when years later OH lost much of his ability to speak overnight all I had to do was make one trip to the bank to get everything set up. (Yes, I know, it assumes mutual trust and willingness to think ahead, but I am so grateful to that solicitor.)
In terms of what to show, I had to hand over the certified copy of the whole document which had the stamp of the Public Guardian and the perforation saying 'Validated' on every page. I am in England.
Yes I do recommend POA .......... don't leave the decisions to someone who does not know you. It not just for the person you care for ...... but what about yourself and your partner taken POA and given it to each other or a child over the age of 18 who can deal with it as you never know when it might be needed.

POA is important and I would 100% recommend to everyone and do remember it is not just for the person you care for but could protect your right too in the event that you become very ill.

I highly recommend it.
I have completed our POA application on GOV.uk. It’s really easy to do and costs £82 for each one i.e financial and health and welfare. So we will be paying £320 instead of the £750 quoted by the solicitor. Hardly any printing involved and still official and registered.
Hello,

If you feel either power of attorney/lasting power of attorney is suitable to your caree's situation I implore you to go right ahead and do it.

The alternative of deputyship is potentially both expensive, and lengthy, to where I mean if you have a complicated case there is a very real chance your loved one could actually pass away before the court of protection makes a decision - bearing in mind when I say decision it may not actually be in agreement with your request, because they will often go on the merits of the paperwork only with no physical contact with the person it concerns.

The PoA/LPoA is just a printed sheet because they are fairly commonplace and done with involvement of the caree.
The deputyship tends to be an official court document, and they include an information pack on covering your auditing/review costs (how long between them varies)

I have gone through the POA/LPA route multiple times for different caree's and one down the deputy path, I would always encourage POA where you can obtain one.
I too go on about COP v POA. Started a thread with that title when I had to go down the court of Protection route. I'm sort of used to it now, case of having to be! My husband would be mortified.